Rodeo’s future competes at the Greeley Independence Stampede | TheFencePost.com

Rodeo’s future competes at the Greeley Independence Stampede

Tony BruguiereColten Ryan started on his quest to be a PBR bull rider when he was just 4-years-old. He is now ready to move from steers to Young Guns and bigger and more difficult bulls.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

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Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.

If the quantity and quality of the contestants at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo are any indication, the future of rodeo in Colorado is in good hands.

There has been a Kids Rodeo at the Stampede for over 10 years. Many rodeos have some sort of sheep riding during an intermission, but, while prizes are given, it is primarily put on for the entertainment of the rodeo patrons. The Greeley Stampede has a different approach. Northern Colorado and the surrounding area has long been a hot bed for rodeo and there are many junior rodeo groups in the area.

The Greeley Stampede decided from the beginning to give something back to the community by holding a Kids Rodeo with different events for all ages and abilities. The kids are not off in some obscure arena, they compete in the fully set up main arena of the Greeley Independence Stampede, and this year it was a night event with lights.

“It’s a neat event to see all those kids out there.” said Justin Watada, the Director of Publicity for the Stampede, “It’s a once a year time that they get to go into the Stampede arena. It’s all set up for the regular PRCA rodeo. I think that it’s great for them to be able to compete in that venue.”

The arena floor is broken into three areas of competition. The largest area is used for key hole, 13 and under barrel racing, 13 and over barrel racing, and goat tying. A long section in front of the north grandstand is set aside for Stick Horse Racing, Goat Ribbon Race, and two age groups of Pole Bending. The chute area is used by the Mountain States Young Guns (MSYG), a junior bull riding association. There is action in all of these areas simultaneously.

To further enhance the feeling for these kids of competing in the big arena, there are entry fees, and money and buckles for the winners. It was not necessary to be a member of the MSYG to compete in the bull riding, but all competitors had to comply with the association rules. The MSYG has six age groups that allow boys and girls from four to 19 to compete for year-end prizes including buckles and saddles. Over all winners in each age group qualify for the National Finals in Oklahoma.

Bull Riding is serious business to these kids. It is hard to visualize an 11-year-old as a veteran, but Colten Ryan started riding sheep when he was barely 4-years-old. He is now a veteran in his last year of riding Steers and ready to make the move up to Young Guns. Colten says, “So far this year I’ve won a couple. I do it for fun and I would like to ride in the PBR. I’ve been working a lot with practice bulls and I think that my chances of riding in the PBR are pretty good as long as I stick with it.”

That is pretty much the same general answer that you get from most of these young bull riders. The end goal is the PBR, although some of them plan a college rodeo scholarship on the way to the PBR.

Behind every kid, there is a dedicated parent. Jeff Firchau of Loveland, Colo., has been ‘going down the road’ with his son, Blake, for nine years. “It still makes me nervous, but I know it’s something he likes to do, so we support and encourage him.” Jeff said, “Sometimes it gets tough financially, but I’m definitely one that believes a guy has to follow his dreams, and, if it’s my boy, he is going to have a chance to do that.”

When it comes to dreams, you do not have to look much further than the bull fighting brothers of Tyler and Garrett Britt from Oklahoma City, who were guest bull fighters at the Greeley Stampede Kids Rodeo. Tyler Wayne, who likes to be called T-Dub, is nine and his brother Garrett is six. They and their father Corey were invited up by Dick Davis, a member of the Stampede Committee.

The Britt brothers are no strangers to rodeo. “They have wanted to bull fight since they were little bitty.” said their father, Corey, “Last fall they got to fight the mutton busting at the PBR Finals. This will be their third year at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie, Okla., so they have done some big ones, but this is the largest outdoor rodeo they have ever been a part of.”

These little guys really look professional in their matching uniforms. They are sponsored by Twisted-X boots and Diabetes Solutions of Oklahoma. There is a reason for the Diabetes Solutions sponsorship as the youngest boy, Garrett, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 15-months-old.

Diabetes Solutions is an organization that sends kids who have Type 1 diabetes to camp. Cory Britt and his boys have a benefit rodeo and silent auction back in Oklahoma and the goal is to completely fund the kid’s camp through the rodeo. A lot of big time rodeo cowboys like Mike Moore, Cory Kuntz, Luke Branquinho, Will Lowe, Kody Lostroh, and others have donated time and prizes to the auction.

“The boys have made some life long friends and I really want to thank the rodeo community. They have been really generous to us. Hopefully a cure can be found soon.” said Cory Britt, “We just feel honored that the Greeley Stampede has allowed us to come up here.”

You can not help but to be impressed by Tyler and Barrett Britt, and all of the young competitors at the Greeley Stampede. The future of rodeo is very bright, indeed.