Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race featured good terrain and weather for riders and horses | TheFencePost.com

Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race featured good terrain and weather for riders and horses

Jo Chytka
Hemingford, Neb.

Lyle Sherfey chalking on numbers for a race.

On a crisp September morning with the temperature at 56 degrees and the skies totally overcast 18 endurance racers were preparing to compete on the first day of the Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race. Both days presented ideal racing conditions for both horse and rider with cool temperatures and a light wind until after 1:00 p.m. when it warmed a little and skies became partly cloudy through the finish of race time.

The location was a beautiful meadow alongside Rush Creek, surrounded by huge cottonwood trees creating a horseshoe shaped area for campers along with ride headquarters, staging areas for vetting the race, P & R (pulse and respiration) stations and a large area for cooling, resting and feeding horses during their mandatory downtime between each leg of their race.

The Rush Creek Land and Livestock’s Arabian Horse Ranch, located one mile east of Lisco, Neb., hosted the AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) sanctioned race the weekend of Sept. 5 & 6. Horse Ranch Manager and Ride Manager Lyle Sherfey, along with his wife Teresa and 15 volunteers worked long hours on both days to provide a 25- and 50-mile race on both Saturday and Sunday along with a barbecue followed by an awards banquet each evening after completion of the races.

The races were run on a portion of Rush Creek’s land, half-way between Lisco and Oshkosh, Neb., on the south side of the highway. An entirely new course from previous years was laid out. This year’s terrain was meadows with sandy soil, high ridges, deep draws and creek crossings. Comments from racers who had attended the races in years past said it was better ground to run on this year with a wonderful campsite.

The races were vetted by Dr. Otis Schmitt from Ten Mile, Tenn., and Dr. Rich Paumer from Ogallala, Neb., along with Dr. Brandi Chytka from Oshkosh, Neb., who was there learning the ropes of endurance race vetting.

Head veterinarian Dr. Schmitt, a semi-retired, 25-year veteran of endurance race vetting has been all over the U.S. in every state but five providing his services. Dr. Paumer vetted the Big Horn 100 in Wyoming for three years and is in his third year of acting as treatment vet for the Rush Creek Reunion.

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Dr. Schmitt said, “We work together and do all the checks for lameness and metabolics and if treatment is required Dr. Paumer provides that since he is licensed in the state of Nebraska.”

He continued, “I like to do this because it is a family event and the cream of the crop in racers. They listen and do what you tell them and don’t fuss about it. They don’t win any money, just bragging rights. It is a good horseman sport and they always exercise good sportsmanship by helping one another. I’m lucky I get to do these.”

Schmitt concluded by saying, “This is a unique race here at Rush Creek, it is near the small town of Lisco and it is a big ride and all of the town gets involved and helps.”

Each day the first race began at 6:30 a.m. for those who chose to compete in the 50-mile race with the 25-mile race following with a start 30 minutes later. The course was comprised of two loops. The first loop was 11.5 miles and the second 13.5. The 50-mile racers covered each loop twice while the 25-milers only ran each loop once.

Comprising the field of competitors on Saturday were three male and 15 female riders. On Sunday the gender of riders stayed roughly the same, but the total number of competitors dropped by one. Riders could compete on both days and some chose to do that. They came from the states of NE, ND, SD, WY, FL, CA and CO and represented a wide variety of occupations such as registered nurse, plastic surgeon, photographer, accountant, high school student, grade school student and vet assistant.

Riding experience ranged from this being their first endurance race to one woman who has competed since 1985. How riders got their start in endurance racing was as varied as the riders themselves. Cindy Dulaney from Castle Rock, Colo., received her Morgan horse, Xena from her husband as a wedding gift. She said, “A crazy neighbor saw us out riding and said looks like you and your horse like to go, maybe you should take up endurance racing, so we did and I fell in love with it. Xena has a huge heart and loves it too.”

Carla Hays from Greeley, Colo., rides her grulla quarter horse, Indigo and has competed for two years; she also is trying her hand at mounted shooting on him. Unfortunately Indigo had to be pulled from the 25-mile race due to a lameness issue. One horse was also pulled from the 50-mile race for lameness.

Joe Haeberle, a 14-year-old junior competitor from Laramie, Wyo., has competed for four years in the NATRC and AERC for two years. He saw the movie Hildago and was fascinated with the idea. He competes on 10-year-old Scooter. He said, “I’ve been on a horse since I was two. I really love the sport and so does my horse. It is very laid back so I just go with it and if you like to talk, that’s good because we do a lot of it on the trail. I’ve met a lot of really nice people; and the food is good! I hope to do this for a long time. I also hope to raise and train a BLM horse next.”

Every junior rider has to be accompanied by a sponsor. Haeberle’s sponsor was Kristin Lineen from Cheyenne, Wyo. She competed on a 9-year-old 1/2 Arab gelding named Snippet. She said, “I asked someone: What do you do with an Arabian horse? They told me endurance racing. So I went to the library and ordered the book, The Complete Book of Endurance Racing. I love it and my goal is to compete in six races a year.”

Ronda Eden, originally from Australia, currently from Laramie, Wyo., rode 10-year-old, Anglo/Arab, Kipling and has competed for six years. Ronda competed both days and said, “I got my start in Australia by my barefoot trimmer, and raced there for two years. It is very similar with a few differences in rules and the races are measured in kilometers. I rode standard bred horses there, but ride Arabs here, and prefer them. My wish list is to go to 10 events a year, or 20 races.”

Carla Stroh from Lusk, Wyo., rides an 11-year-old gelding named Spirit but they call him ‘Spook.’ Her husband bought the horse for her and she has run in one race a year for three years, and three races this year. “Spook is very competitive and I’ve had offers at every race to sell him. He’s not for sale. My goal is to ride in the 100-mile race – Big Horn 100 and finish. “

Sami Browneller from Palmer Lake, Colo., won the 50-mile race as well as Best Condition on Saturday riding Royal Damsal. She has competed for 10 years and said, “I started because I like to ride all day and I needed an excuse. I will ride anything I can get my hands on. I also do 3-day events.”

Rush Creek Arabians have been a presence in the Arabian world for quite a long time. Sherfey said, “The ranch has raised endurance horses for over 50 years and have between 100 and 110 horses in their band, including brood mares and stallions.

They not only raise the Arabians to race; they also contest on them. Lyn Jones, president of Rush Creek Land and Livestock also competes and rode the second day of the Rush Creek Reunion on one of the ranch’s Arabians. Sherfey has 265 endurance miles to his credit, and 160 limited distance miles riding Rush Creek horses including Rush Creek Parker, RC Quartz, RC Capper, RC Pinon and most recently RC Nerf.

RC Nerf competed in the 2009 Tevis Cup in California and placed 25th in a field of 172 horses, with only 51 percent completing the 100-mile race. Lyle was unable to race RC Nerf at the reunion because he has been sold.

Rush Creek Arabians also has the honor of having raised and owned the horse Rushcreek Hans. Sherfey said, “Rushcreek Hans still holds the all-time fastest time for the Tevis Cup race.”

The horse that won the 25-mile race on Saturday was Rushcreek Jerdee, owned and ridden by Debbie Kolegraf, from Bismark, N.D. She has ridden him for three years and also owns Rushcreek Newt.

A Best Condition award was given for each race in memory of the notable Rush Creek Arabian endurance horses, Rushcreek Mark and Rushcreek Lad. RC Lad was inducted in the AERC Hall of Fame and had over 21,000 endurance race miles to his credit. The winner’s name will be inscribed on a plate at the base of the trophy. Various other prizes were awarded at the banquet held both nights for place finishes and a turtle was awarded for those finishing last in each race.

Lyle said, “The number of riders was down this year because in past years we had trouble with the ground having a lot of gopher mounds. This year we laid out the course on higher ground and were able to get above those and didn’t have the problems on the higher, rocky ground.

“The reason we named the event the Rush Creek Reunion was to get everyone who had purchased a Rush Creek horse to come back for a reunion and ride,” Sherfey said. “I think it was very successful. We had great volunteers and a good vet crew. The banquet had wonderful pork provided by Bob Hattendorf (Garco Grillers) from Oshkosh. We didn’t have any problems and the weather cooperated by being cool for the horses to run in. Everyone really like the campsite and were happy with the ride; they said it was a good trail and well-marked. I was very happy with the turn out.”

The Rush Creek Reunion is held every year over the Labor Day weekend, so it is easy to plan for and mark on the calendar.

Results For The Rush Creek Reunion: Sept. 5, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best condition- Sami Browneller, 4h. 54m. 00s riding Royal Damsal; #2 Ronda Eden, 5h. 14m. 15s riding Kipling; #3 Lisa Baker, 5h. 28m. 32s riding SP Sarcast; #4 Carla Stroh, 5h. 28m. 35s riding Spirit; #5 Linda Browneller, 5h. 46 m. 36s riding Flash d’or; #6 Kristin Lineen, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Snippet; #7 Joe Haeberle, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Scooter.

Sept. 5, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Kolegraf, 2h. 36m. 47s riding Rushcreek Jerdee; #2 & Best Condition, Tim French, 3 h. 00m. 56s riding Senator Resolved; #3, John Haeberle, 3h. 21m. 37s riding Royal Pazazz; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3 h. 27m 14s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Patti Rooney, 3h. 28m. 27s riding Rushcreek Merle; #6 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 31m. 53s riding Kenlyn Escapade; #7 Nancy Ross, 3h. 57m. 26s riding Sarg; #8 Jeanne Beck, 4h. 25m. 19s riding Dewey; #9 Mary Snyder, 4h. 25m. 43s riding Star.

Sept. 6, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best Condition Kelsey Kimbler, 5h. 40m. 56s riding HY Cimmarons Goliathe; #2 Kirsten Kimbler 5h. 40m. 57s riding Cody Canuk; #3 Hanna Pruss, 6h. 36m. 30s riding Krusader; #4 Deb Kolegraf, 6h. 36m. 32s riding Rushcreek Newt; #5 McCamey Kimbler, 6h. 36m. 34s riding Fringant.

Sept. 6, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Karl, 2h. 45m. 37s riding Drown Majus Dee; #2 & Best condition Paschal Karl, 2h. 45m. 54s riding Dustee Seeker; #3 Patti Rooney, 3h. 38m. 08s riding Rushcreek Merle; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3h. 38m. 45s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 48m. 36s riding Kenlyn Navigator; #6 Linda Fisher, 3h. 55m. 38s riding Kenlyn Muscatella; #7 Lyn Jones, 3h. 56m. 03s riding Rushcreek Guess; #8 Robert Bischoff, 3h. 57m. 47s riding Kenlyn Finesse; #9 Chris Compton, 4h. 16m. 34s riding Kipling; #10 Ronda Eden, 4h. 16m. 58s riding Flambeau; #11 Tessa Kimbler, 4h. 37m. 14s riding Kodee StarLite; #12 Kelly Kiimbler, 4h. 37m. 28s riding Whin Dance.

On a crisp September morning with the temperature at 56 degrees and the skies totally overcast 18 endurance racers were preparing to compete on the first day of the Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race. Both days presented ideal racing conditions for both horse and rider with cool temperatures and a light wind until after 1:00 p.m. when it warmed a little and skies became partly cloudy through the finish of race time.

The location was a beautiful meadow alongside Rush Creek, surrounded by huge cottonwood trees creating a horseshoe shaped area for campers along with ride headquarters, staging areas for vetting the race, P & R (pulse and respiration) stations and a large area for cooling, resting and feeding horses during their mandatory downtime between each leg of their race.

The Rush Creek Land and Livestock’s Arabian Horse Ranch, located one mile east of Lisco, Neb., hosted the AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) sanctioned race the weekend of Sept. 5 & 6. Horse Ranch Manager and Ride Manager Lyle Sherfey, along with his wife Teresa and 15 volunteers worked long hours on both days to provide a 25- and 50-mile race on both Saturday and Sunday along with a barbecue followed by an awards banquet each evening after completion of the races.

The races were run on a portion of Rush Creek’s land, half-way between Lisco and Oshkosh, Neb., on the south side of the highway. An entirely new course from previous years was laid out. This year’s terrain was meadows with sandy soil, high ridges, deep draws and creek crossings. Comments from racers who had attended the races in years past said it was better ground to run on this year with a wonderful campsite.

The races were vetted by Dr. Otis Schmitt from Ten Mile, Tenn., and Dr. Rich Paumer from Ogallala, Neb., along with Dr. Brandi Chytka from Oshkosh, Neb., who was there learning the ropes of endurance race vetting.

Head veterinarian Dr. Schmitt, a semi-retired, 25-year veteran of endurance race vetting has been all over the U.S. in every state but five providing his services. Dr. Paumer vetted the Big Horn 100 in Wyoming for three years and is in his third year of acting as treatment vet for the Rush Creek Reunion.

Dr. Schmitt said, “We work together and do all the checks for lameness and metabolics and if treatment is required Dr. Paumer provides that since he is licensed in the state of Nebraska.”

He continued, “I like to do this because it is a family event and the cream of the crop in racers. They listen and do what you tell them and don’t fuss about it. They don’t win any money, just bragging rights. It is a good horseman sport and they always exercise good sportsmanship by helping one another. I’m lucky I get to do these.”

Schmitt concluded by saying, “This is a unique race here at Rush Creek, it is near the small town of Lisco and it is a big ride and all of the town gets involved and helps.”

Each day the first race began at 6:30 a.m. for those who chose to compete in the 50-mile race with the 25-mile race following with a start 30 minutes later. The course was comprised of two loops. The first loop was 11.5 miles and the second 13.5. The 50-mile racers covered each loop twice while the 25-milers only ran each loop once.

Comprising the field of competitors on Saturday were three male and 15 female riders. On Sunday the gender of riders stayed roughly the same, but the total number of competitors dropped by one. Riders could compete on both days and some chose to do that. They came from the states of NE, ND, SD, WY, FL, CA and CO and represented a wide variety of occupations such as registered nurse, plastic surgeon, photographer, accountant, high school student, grade school student and vet assistant.

Riding experience ranged from this being their first endurance race to one woman who has competed since 1985. How riders got their start in endurance racing was as varied as the riders themselves. Cindy Dulaney from Castle Rock, Colo., received her Morgan horse, Xena from her husband as a wedding gift. She said, “A crazy neighbor saw us out riding and said looks like you and your horse like to go, maybe you should take up endurance racing, so we did and I fell in love with it. Xena has a huge heart and loves it too.”

Carla Hays from Greeley, Colo., rides her grulla quarter horse, Indigo and has competed for two years; she also is trying her hand at mounted shooting on him. Unfortunately Indigo had to be pulled from the 25-mile race due to a lameness issue. One horse was also pulled from the 50-mile race for lameness.

Joe Haeberle, a 14-year-old junior competitor from Laramie, Wyo., has competed for four years in the NATRC and AERC for two years. He saw the movie Hildago and was fascinated with the idea. He competes on 10-year-old Scooter. He said, “I’ve been on a horse since I was two. I really love the sport and so does my horse. It is very laid back so I just go with it and if you like to talk, that’s good because we do a lot of it on the trail. I’ve met a lot of really nice people; and the food is good! I hope to do this for a long time. I also hope to raise and train a BLM horse next.”

Every junior rider has to be accompanied by a sponsor. Haeberle’s sponsor was Kristin Lineen from Cheyenne, Wyo. She competed on a 9-year-old 1/2 Arab gelding named Snippet. She said, “I asked someone: What do you do with an Arabian horse? They told me endurance racing. So I went to the library and ordered the book, The Complete Book of Endurance Racing. I love it and my goal is to compete in six races a year.”

Ronda Eden, originally from Australia, currently from Laramie, Wyo., rode 10-year-old, Anglo/Arab, Kipling and has competed for six years. Ronda competed both days and said, “I got my start in Australia by my barefoot trimmer, and raced there for two years. It is very similar with a few differences in rules and the races are measured in kilometers. I rode standard bred horses there, but ride Arabs here, and prefer them. My wish list is to go to 10 events a year, or 20 races.”

Carla Stroh from Lusk, Wyo., rides an 11-year-old gelding named Spirit but they call him ‘Spook.’ Her husband bought the horse for her and she has run in one race a year for three years, and three races this year. “Spook is very competitive and I’ve had offers at every race to sell him. He’s not for sale. My goal is to ride in the 100-mile race – Big Horn 100 and finish. “

Sami Browneller from Palmer Lake, Colo., won the 50-mile race as well as Best Condition on Saturday riding Royal Damsal. She has competed for 10 years and said, “I started because I like to ride all day and I needed an excuse. I will ride anything I can get my hands on. I also do 3-day events.”

Rush Creek Arabians have been a presence in the Arabian world for quite a long time. Sherfey said, “The ranch has raised endurance horses for over 50 years and have between 100 and 110 horses in their band, including brood mares and stallions.

They not only raise the Arabians to race; they also contest on them. Lyn Jones, president of Rush Creek Land and Livestock also competes and rode the second day of the Rush Creek Reunion on one of the ranch’s Arabians. Sherfey has 265 endurance miles to his credit, and 160 limited distance miles riding Rush Creek horses including Rush Creek Parker, RC Quartz, RC Capper, RC Pinon and most recently RC Nerf.

RC Nerf competed in the 2009 Tevis Cup in California and placed 25th in a field of 172 horses, with only 51 percent completing the 100-mile race. Lyle was unable to race RC Nerf at the reunion because he has been sold.

Rush Creek Arabians also has the honor of having raised and owned the horse Rushcreek Hans. Sherfey said, “Rushcreek Hans still holds the all-time fastest time for the Tevis Cup race.”

The horse that won the 25-mile race on Saturday was Rushcreek Jerdee, owned and ridden by Debbie Kolegraf, from Bismark, N.D. She has ridden him for three years and also owns Rushcreek Newt.

A Best Condition award was given for each race in memory of the notable Rush Creek Arabian endurance horses, Rushcreek Mark and Rushcreek Lad. RC Lad was inducted in the AERC Hall of Fame and had over 21,000 endurance race miles to his credit. The winner’s name will be inscribed on a plate at the base of the trophy. Various other prizes were awarded at the banquet held both nights for place finishes and a turtle was awarded for those finishing last in each race.

Lyle said, “The number of riders was down this year because in past years we had trouble with the ground having a lot of gopher mounds. This year we laid out the course on higher ground and were able to get above those and didn’t have the problems on the higher, rocky ground.

“The reason we named the event the Rush Creek Reunion was to get everyone who had purchased a Rush Creek horse to come back for a reunion and ride,” Sherfey said. “I think it was very successful. We had great volunteers and a good vet crew. The banquet had wonderful pork provided by Bob Hattendorf (Garco Grillers) from Oshkosh. We didn’t have any problems and the weather cooperated by being cool for the horses to run in. Everyone really like the campsite and were happy with the ride; they said it was a good trail and well-marked. I was very happy with the turn out.”

The Rush Creek Reunion is held every year over the Labor Day weekend, so it is easy to plan for and mark on the calendar.

Results For The Rush Creek Reunion: Sept. 5, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best condition- Sami Browneller, 4h. 54m. 00s riding Royal Damsal; #2 Ronda Eden, 5h. 14m. 15s riding Kipling; #3 Lisa Baker, 5h. 28m. 32s riding SP Sarcast; #4 Carla Stroh, 5h. 28m. 35s riding Spirit; #5 Linda Browneller, 5h. 46 m. 36s riding Flash d’or; #6 Kristin Lineen, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Snippet; #7 Joe Haeberle, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Scooter.

Sept. 5, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Kolegraf, 2h. 36m. 47s riding Rushcreek Jerdee; #2 & Best Condition, Tim French, 3 h. 00m. 56s riding Senator Resolved; #3, John Haeberle, 3h. 21m. 37s riding Royal Pazazz; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3 h. 27m 14s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Patti Rooney, 3h. 28m. 27s riding Rushcreek Merle; #6 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 31m. 53s riding Kenlyn Escapade; #7 Nancy Ross, 3h. 57m. 26s riding Sarg; #8 Jeanne Beck, 4h. 25m. 19s riding Dewey; #9 Mary Snyder, 4h. 25m. 43s riding Star.

Sept. 6, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best Condition Kelsey Kimbler, 5h. 40m. 56s riding HY Cimmarons Goliathe; #2 Kirsten Kimbler 5h. 40m. 57s riding Cody Canuk; #3 Hanna Pruss, 6h. 36m. 30s riding Krusader; #4 Deb Kolegraf, 6h. 36m. 32s riding Rushcreek Newt; #5 McCamey Kimbler, 6h. 36m. 34s riding Fringant.

Sept. 6, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Karl, 2h. 45m. 37s riding Drown Majus Dee; #2 & Best condition Paschal Karl, 2h. 45m. 54s riding Dustee Seeker; #3 Patti Rooney, 3h. 38m. 08s riding Rushcreek Merle; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3h. 38m. 45s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 48m. 36s riding Kenlyn Navigator; #6 Linda Fisher, 3h. 55m. 38s riding Kenlyn Muscatella; #7 Lyn Jones, 3h. 56m. 03s riding Rushcreek Guess; #8 Robert Bischoff, 3h. 57m. 47s riding Kenlyn Finesse; #9 Chris Compton, 4h. 16m. 34s riding Kipling; #10 Ronda Eden, 4h. 16m. 58s riding Flambeau; #11 Tessa Kimbler, 4h. 37m. 14s riding Kodee StarLite; #12 Kelly Kiimbler, 4h. 37m. 28s riding Whin Dance.

On a crisp September morning with the temperature at 56 degrees and the skies totally overcast 18 endurance racers were preparing to compete on the first day of the Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race. Both days presented ideal racing conditions for both horse and rider with cool temperatures and a light wind until after 1:00 p.m. when it warmed a little and skies became partly cloudy through the finish of race time.

The location was a beautiful meadow alongside Rush Creek, surrounded by huge cottonwood trees creating a horseshoe shaped area for campers along with ride headquarters, staging areas for vetting the race, P & R (pulse and respiration) stations and a large area for cooling, resting and feeding horses during their mandatory downtime between each leg of their race.

The Rush Creek Land and Livestock’s Arabian Horse Ranch, located one mile east of Lisco, Neb., hosted the AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) sanctioned race the weekend of Sept. 5 & 6. Horse Ranch Manager and Ride Manager Lyle Sherfey, along with his wife Teresa and 15 volunteers worked long hours on both days to provide a 25- and 50-mile race on both Saturday and Sunday along with a barbecue followed by an awards banquet each evening after completion of the races.

The races were run on a portion of Rush Creek’s land, half-way between Lisco and Oshkosh, Neb., on the south side of the highway. An entirely new course from previous years was laid out. This year’s terrain was meadows with sandy soil, high ridges, deep draws and creek crossings. Comments from racers who had attended the races in years past said it was better ground to run on this year with a wonderful campsite.

The races were vetted by Dr. Otis Schmitt from Ten Mile, Tenn., and Dr. Rich Paumer from Ogallala, Neb., along with Dr. Brandi Chytka from Oshkosh, Neb., who was there learning the ropes of endurance race vetting.

Head veterinarian Dr. Schmitt, a semi-retired, 25-year veteran of endurance race vetting has been all over the U.S. in every state but five providing his services. Dr. Paumer vetted the Big Horn 100 in Wyoming for three years and is in his third year of acting as treatment vet for the Rush Creek Reunion.

Dr. Schmitt said, “We work together and do all the checks for lameness and metabolics and if treatment is required Dr. Paumer provides that since he is licensed in the state of Nebraska.”

He continued, “I like to do this because it is a family event and the cream of the crop in racers. They listen and do what you tell them and don’t fuss about it. They don’t win any money, just bragging rights. It is a good horseman sport and they always exercise good sportsmanship by helping one another. I’m lucky I get to do these.”

Schmitt concluded by saying, “This is a unique race here at Rush Creek, it is near the small town of Lisco and it is a big ride and all of the town gets involved and helps.”

Each day the first race began at 6:30 a.m. for those who chose to compete in the 50-mile race with the 25-mile race following with a start 30 minutes later. The course was comprised of two loops. The first loop was 11.5 miles and the second 13.5. The 50-mile racers covered each loop twice while the 25-milers only ran each loop once.

Comprising the field of competitors on Saturday were three male and 15 female riders. On Sunday the gender of riders stayed roughly the same, but the total number of competitors dropped by one. Riders could compete on both days and some chose to do that. They came from the states of NE, ND, SD, WY, FL, CA and CO and represented a wide variety of occupations such as registered nurse, plastic surgeon, photographer, accountant, high school student, grade school student and vet assistant.

Riding experience ranged from this being their first endurance race to one woman who has competed since 1985. How riders got their start in endurance racing was as varied as the riders themselves. Cindy Dulaney from Castle Rock, Colo., received her Morgan horse, Xena from her husband as a wedding gift. She said, “A crazy neighbor saw us out riding and said looks like you and your horse like to go, maybe you should take up endurance racing, so we did and I fell in love with it. Xena has a huge heart and loves it too.”

Carla Hays from Greeley, Colo., rides her grulla quarter horse, Indigo and has competed for two years; she also is trying her hand at mounted shooting on him. Unfortunately Indigo had to be pulled from the 25-mile race due to a lameness issue. One horse was also pulled from the 50-mile race for lameness.

Joe Haeberle, a 14-year-old junior competitor from Laramie, Wyo., has competed for four years in the NATRC and AERC for two years. He saw the movie Hildago and was fascinated with the idea. He competes on 10-year-old Scooter. He said, “I’ve been on a horse since I was two. I really love the sport and so does my horse. It is very laid back so I just go with it and if you like to talk, that’s good because we do a lot of it on the trail. I’ve met a lot of really nice people; and the food is good! I hope to do this for a long time. I also hope to raise and train a BLM horse next.”

Every junior rider has to be accompanied by a sponsor. Haeberle’s sponsor was Kristin Lineen from Cheyenne, Wyo. She competed on a 9-year-old 1/2 Arab gelding named Snippet. She said, “I asked someone: What do you do with an Arabian horse? They told me endurance racing. So I went to the library and ordered the book, The Complete Book of Endurance Racing. I love it and my goal is to compete in six races a year.”

Ronda Eden, originally from Australia, currently from Laramie, Wyo., rode 10-year-old, Anglo/Arab, Kipling and has competed for six years. Ronda competed both days and said, “I got my start in Australia by my barefoot trimmer, and raced there for two years. It is very similar with a few differences in rules and the races are measured in kilometers. I rode standard bred horses there, but ride Arabs here, and prefer them. My wish list is to go to 10 events a year, or 20 races.”

Carla Stroh from Lusk, Wyo., rides an 11-year-old gelding named Spirit but they call him ‘Spook.’ Her husband bought the horse for her and she has run in one race a year for three years, and three races this year. “Spook is very competitive and I’ve had offers at every race to sell him. He’s not for sale. My goal is to ride in the 100-mile race – Big Horn 100 and finish. “

Sami Browneller from Palmer Lake, Colo., won the 50-mile race as well as Best Condition on Saturday riding Royal Damsal. She has competed for 10 years and said, “I started because I like to ride all day and I needed an excuse. I will ride anything I can get my hands on. I also do 3-day events.”

Rush Creek Arabians have been a presence in the Arabian world for quite a long time. Sherfey said, “The ranch has raised endurance horses for over 50 years and have between 100 and 110 horses in their band, including brood mares and stallions.

They not only raise the Arabians to race; they also contest on them. Lyn Jones, president of Rush Creek Land and Livestock also competes and rode the second day of the Rush Creek Reunion on one of the ranch’s Arabians. Sherfey has 265 endurance miles to his credit, and 160 limited distance miles riding Rush Creek horses including Rush Creek Parker, RC Quartz, RC Capper, RC Pinon and most recently RC Nerf.

RC Nerf competed in the 2009 Tevis Cup in California and placed 25th in a field of 172 horses, with only 51 percent completing the 100-mile race. Lyle was unable to race RC Nerf at the reunion because he has been sold.

Rush Creek Arabians also has the honor of having raised and owned the horse Rushcreek Hans. Sherfey said, “Rushcreek Hans still holds the all-time fastest time for the Tevis Cup race.”

The horse that won the 25-mile race on Saturday was Rushcreek Jerdee, owned and ridden by Debbie Kolegraf, from Bismark, N.D. She has ridden him for three years and also owns Rushcreek Newt.

A Best Condition award was given for each race in memory of the notable Rush Creek Arabian endurance horses, Rushcreek Mark and Rushcreek Lad. RC Lad was inducted in the AERC Hall of Fame and had over 21,000 endurance race miles to his credit. The winner’s name will be inscribed on a plate at the base of the trophy. Various other prizes were awarded at the banquet held both nights for place finishes and a turtle was awarded for those finishing last in each race.

Lyle said, “The number of riders was down this year because in past years we had trouble with the ground having a lot of gopher mounds. This year we laid out the course on higher ground and were able to get above those and didn’t have the problems on the higher, rocky ground.

“The reason we named the event the Rush Creek Reunion was to get everyone who had purchased a Rush Creek horse to come back for a reunion and ride,” Sherfey said. “I think it was very successful. We had great volunteers and a good vet crew. The banquet had wonderful pork provided by Bob Hattendorf (Garco Grillers) from Oshkosh. We didn’t have any problems and the weather cooperated by being cool for the horses to run in. Everyone really like the campsite and were happy with the ride; they said it was a good trail and well-marked. I was very happy with the turn out.”

The Rush Creek Reunion is held every year over the Labor Day weekend, so it is easy to plan for and mark on the calendar.

Results For The Rush Creek Reunion: Sept. 5, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best condition- Sami Browneller, 4h. 54m. 00s riding Royal Damsal; #2 Ronda Eden, 5h. 14m. 15s riding Kipling; #3 Lisa Baker, 5h. 28m. 32s riding SP Sarcast; #4 Carla Stroh, 5h. 28m. 35s riding Spirit; #5 Linda Browneller, 5h. 46 m. 36s riding Flash d’or; #6 Kristin Lineen, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Snippet; #7 Joe Haeberle, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Scooter.

Sept. 5, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Kolegraf, 2h. 36m. 47s riding Rushcreek Jerdee; #2 & Best Condition, Tim French, 3 h. 00m. 56s riding Senator Resolved; #3, John Haeberle, 3h. 21m. 37s riding Royal Pazazz; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3 h. 27m 14s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Patti Rooney, 3h. 28m. 27s riding Rushcreek Merle; #6 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 31m. 53s riding Kenlyn Escapade; #7 Nancy Ross, 3h. 57m. 26s riding Sarg; #8 Jeanne Beck, 4h. 25m. 19s riding Dewey; #9 Mary Snyder, 4h. 25m. 43s riding Star.

Sept. 6, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best Condition Kelsey Kimbler, 5h. 40m. 56s riding HY Cimmarons Goliathe; #2 Kirsten Kimbler 5h. 40m. 57s riding Cody Canuk; #3 Hanna Pruss, 6h. 36m. 30s riding Krusader; #4 Deb Kolegraf, 6h. 36m. 32s riding Rushcreek Newt; #5 McCamey Kimbler, 6h. 36m. 34s riding Fringant.

Sept. 6, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Karl, 2h. 45m. 37s riding Drown Majus Dee; #2 & Best condition Paschal Karl, 2h. 45m. 54s riding Dustee Seeker; #3 Patti Rooney, 3h. 38m. 08s riding Rushcreek Merle; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3h. 38m. 45s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 48m. 36s riding Kenlyn Navigator; #6 Linda Fisher, 3h. 55m. 38s riding Kenlyn Muscatella; #7 Lyn Jones, 3h. 56m. 03s riding Rushcreek Guess; #8 Robert Bischoff, 3h. 57m. 47s riding Kenlyn Finesse; #9 Chris Compton, 4h. 16m. 34s riding Kipling; #10 Ronda Eden, 4h. 16m. 58s riding Flambeau; #11 Tessa Kimbler, 4h. 37m. 14s riding Kodee StarLite; #12 Kelly Kiimbler, 4h. 37m. 28s riding Whin Dance.

On a crisp September morning with the temperature at 56 degrees and the skies totally overcast 18 endurance racers were preparing to compete on the first day of the Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race. Both days presented ideal racing conditions for both horse and rider with cool temperatures and a light wind until after 1:00 p.m. when it warmed a little and skies became partly cloudy through the finish of race time.

The location was a beautiful meadow alongside Rush Creek, surrounded by huge cottonwood trees creating a horseshoe shaped area for campers along with ride headquarters, staging areas for vetting the race, P & R (pulse and respiration) stations and a large area for cooling, resting and feeding horses during their mandatory downtime between each leg of their race.

The Rush Creek Land and Livestock’s Arabian Horse Ranch, located one mile east of Lisco, Neb., hosted the AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) sanctioned race the weekend of Sept. 5 & 6. Horse Ranch Manager and Ride Manager Lyle Sherfey, along with his wife Teresa and 15 volunteers worked long hours on both days to provide a 25- and 50-mile race on both Saturday and Sunday along with a barbecue followed by an awards banquet each evening after completion of the races.

The races were run on a portion of Rush Creek’s land, half-way between Lisco and Oshkosh, Neb., on the south side of the highway. An entirely new course from previous years was laid out. This year’s terrain was meadows with sandy soil, high ridges, deep draws and creek crossings. Comments from racers who had attended the races in years past said it was better ground to run on this year with a wonderful campsite.

The races were vetted by Dr. Otis Schmitt from Ten Mile, Tenn., and Dr. Rich Paumer from Ogallala, Neb., along with Dr. Brandi Chytka from Oshkosh, Neb., who was there learning the ropes of endurance race vetting.

Head veterinarian Dr. Schmitt, a semi-retired, 25-year veteran of endurance race vetting has been all over the U.S. in every state but five providing his services. Dr. Paumer vetted the Big Horn 100 in Wyoming for three years and is in his third year of acting as treatment vet for the Rush Creek Reunion.

Dr. Schmitt said, “We work together and do all the checks for lameness and metabolics and if treatment is required Dr. Paumer provides that since he is licensed in the state of Nebraska.”

He continued, “I like to do this because it is a family event and the cream of the crop in racers. They listen and do what you tell them and don’t fuss about it. They don’t win any money, just bragging rights. It is a good horseman sport and they always exercise good sportsmanship by helping one another. I’m lucky I get to do these.”

Schmitt concluded by saying, “This is a unique race here at Rush Creek, it is near the small town of Lisco and it is a big ride and all of the town gets involved and helps.”

Each day the first race began at 6:30 a.m. for those who chose to compete in the 50-mile race with the 25-mile race following with a start 30 minutes later. The course was comprised of two loops. The first loop was 11.5 miles and the second 13.5. The 50-mile racers covered each loop twice while the 25-milers only ran each loop once.

Comprising the field of competitors on Saturday were three male and 15 female riders. On Sunday the gender of riders stayed roughly the same, but the total number of competitors dropped by one. Riders could compete on both days and some chose to do that. They came from the states of NE, ND, SD, WY, FL, CA and CO and represented a wide variety of occupations such as registered nurse, plastic surgeon, photographer, accountant, high school student, grade school student and vet assistant.

Riding experience ranged from this being their first endurance race to one woman who has competed since 1985. How riders got their start in endurance racing was as varied as the riders themselves. Cindy Dulaney from Castle Rock, Colo., received her Morgan horse, Xena from her husband as a wedding gift. She said, “A crazy neighbor saw us out riding and said looks like you and your horse like to go, maybe you should take up endurance racing, so we did and I fell in love with it. Xena has a huge heart and loves it too.”

Carla Hays from Greeley, Colo., rides her grulla quarter horse, Indigo and has competed for two years; she also is trying her hand at mounted shooting on him. Unfortunately Indigo had to be pulled from the 25-mile race due to a lameness issue. One horse was also pulled from the 50-mile race for lameness.

Joe Haeberle, a 14-year-old junior competitor from Laramie, Wyo., has competed for four years in the NATRC and AERC for two years. He saw the movie Hildago and was fascinated with the idea. He competes on 10-year-old Scooter. He said, “I’ve been on a horse since I was two. I really love the sport and so does my horse. It is very laid back so I just go with it and if you like to talk, that’s good because we do a lot of it on the trail. I’ve met a lot of really nice people; and the food is good! I hope to do this for a long time. I also hope to raise and train a BLM horse next.”

Every junior rider has to be accompanied by a sponsor. Haeberle’s sponsor was Kristin Lineen from Cheyenne, Wyo. She competed on a 9-year-old 1/2 Arab gelding named Snippet. She said, “I asked someone: What do you do with an Arabian horse? They told me endurance racing. So I went to the library and ordered the book, The Complete Book of Endurance Racing. I love it and my goal is to compete in six races a year.”

Ronda Eden, originally from Australia, currently from Laramie, Wyo., rode 10-year-old, Anglo/Arab, Kipling and has competed for six years. Ronda competed both days and said, “I got my start in Australia by my barefoot trimmer, and raced there for two years. It is very similar with a few differences in rules and the races are measured in kilometers. I rode standard bred horses there, but ride Arabs here, and prefer them. My wish list is to go to 10 events a year, or 20 races.”

Carla Stroh from Lusk, Wyo., rides an 11-year-old gelding named Spirit but they call him ‘Spook.’ Her husband bought the horse for her and she has run in one race a year for three years, and three races this year. “Spook is very competitive and I’ve had offers at every race to sell him. He’s not for sale. My goal is to ride in the 100-mile race – Big Horn 100 and finish. “

Sami Browneller from Palmer Lake, Colo., won the 50-mile race as well as Best Condition on Saturday riding Royal Damsal. She has competed for 10 years and said, “I started because I like to ride all day and I needed an excuse. I will ride anything I can get my hands on. I also do 3-day events.”

Rush Creek Arabians have been a presence in the Arabian world for quite a long time. Sherfey said, “The ranch has raised endurance horses for over 50 years and have between 100 and 110 horses in their band, including brood mares and stallions.

They not only raise the Arabians to race; they also contest on them. Lyn Jones, president of Rush Creek Land and Livestock also competes and rode the second day of the Rush Creek Reunion on one of the ranch’s Arabians. Sherfey has 265 endurance miles to his credit, and 160 limited distance miles riding Rush Creek horses including Rush Creek Parker, RC Quartz, RC Capper, RC Pinon and most recently RC Nerf.

RC Nerf competed in the 2009 Tevis Cup in California and placed 25th in a field of 172 horses, with only 51 percent completing the 100-mile race. Lyle was unable to race RC Nerf at the reunion because he has been sold.

Rush Creek Arabians also has the honor of having raised and owned the horse Rushcreek Hans. Sherfey said, “Rushcreek Hans still holds the all-time fastest time for the Tevis Cup race.”

The horse that won the 25-mile race on Saturday was Rushcreek Jerdee, owned and ridden by Debbie Kolegraf, from Bismark, N.D. She has ridden him for three years and also owns Rushcreek Newt.

A Best Condition award was given for each race in memory of the notable Rush Creek Arabian endurance horses, Rushcreek Mark and Rushcreek Lad. RC Lad was inducted in the AERC Hall of Fame and had over 21,000 endurance race miles to his credit. The winner’s name will be inscribed on a plate at the base of the trophy. Various other prizes were awarded at the banquet held both nights for place finishes and a turtle was awarded for those finishing last in each race.

Lyle said, “The number of riders was down this year because in past years we had trouble with the ground having a lot of gopher mounds. This year we laid out the course on higher ground and were able to get above those and didn’t have the problems on the higher, rocky ground.

“The reason we named the event the Rush Creek Reunion was to get everyone who had purchased a Rush Creek horse to come back for a reunion and ride,” Sherfey said. “I think it was very successful. We had great volunteers and a good vet crew. The banquet had wonderful pork provided by Bob Hattendorf (Garco Grillers) from Oshkosh. We didn’t have any problems and the weather cooperated by being cool for the horses to run in. Everyone really like the campsite and were happy with the ride; they said it was a good trail and well-marked. I was very happy with the turn out.”

The Rush Creek Reunion is held every year over the Labor Day weekend, so it is easy to plan for and mark on the calendar.

Results For The Rush Creek Reunion: Sept. 5, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best condition- Sami Browneller, 4h. 54m. 00s riding Royal Damsal; #2 Ronda Eden, 5h. 14m. 15s riding Kipling; #3 Lisa Baker, 5h. 28m. 32s riding SP Sarcast; #4 Carla Stroh, 5h. 28m. 35s riding Spirit; #5 Linda Browneller, 5h. 46 m. 36s riding Flash d’or; #6 Kristin Lineen, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Snippet; #7 Joe Haeberle, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Scooter.

Sept. 5, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Kolegraf, 2h. 36m. 47s riding Rushcreek Jerdee; #2 & Best Condition, Tim French, 3 h. 00m. 56s riding Senator Resolved; #3, John Haeberle, 3h. 21m. 37s riding Royal Pazazz; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3 h. 27m 14s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Patti Rooney, 3h. 28m. 27s riding Rushcreek Merle; #6 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 31m. 53s riding Kenlyn Escapade; #7 Nancy Ross, 3h. 57m. 26s riding Sarg; #8 Jeanne Beck, 4h. 25m. 19s riding Dewey; #9 Mary Snyder, 4h. 25m. 43s riding Star.

Sept. 6, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best Condition Kelsey Kimbler, 5h. 40m. 56s riding HY Cimmarons Goliathe; #2 Kirsten Kimbler 5h. 40m. 57s riding Cody Canuk; #3 Hanna Pruss, 6h. 36m. 30s riding Krusader; #4 Deb Kolegraf, 6h. 36m. 32s riding Rushcreek Newt; #5 McCamey Kimbler, 6h. 36m. 34s riding Fringant.

Sept. 6, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Karl, 2h. 45m. 37s riding Drown Majus Dee; #2 & Best condition Paschal Karl, 2h. 45m. 54s riding Dustee Seeker; #3 Patti Rooney, 3h. 38m. 08s riding Rushcreek Merle; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3h. 38m. 45s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 48m. 36s riding Kenlyn Navigator; #6 Linda Fisher, 3h. 55m. 38s riding Kenlyn Muscatella; #7 Lyn Jones, 3h. 56m. 03s riding Rushcreek Guess; #8 Robert Bischoff, 3h. 57m. 47s riding Kenlyn Finesse; #9 Chris Compton, 4h. 16m. 34s riding Kipling; #10 Ronda Eden, 4h. 16m. 58s riding Flambeau; #11 Tessa Kimbler, 4h. 37m. 14s riding Kodee StarLite; #12 Kelly Kiimbler, 4h. 37m. 28s riding Whin Dance.

On a crisp September morning with the temperature at 56 degrees and the skies totally overcast 18 endurance racers were preparing to compete on the first day of the Rush Creek Reunion Endurance Race. Both days presented ideal racing conditions for both horse and rider with cool temperatures and a light wind until after 1:00 p.m. when it warmed a little and skies became partly cloudy through the finish of race time.

The location was a beautiful meadow alongside Rush Creek, surrounded by huge cottonwood trees creating a horseshoe shaped area for campers along with ride headquarters, staging areas for vetting the race, P & R (pulse and respiration) stations and a large area for cooling, resting and feeding horses during their mandatory downtime between each leg of their race.

The Rush Creek Land and Livestock’s Arabian Horse Ranch, located one mile east of Lisco, Neb., hosted the AERC (American Endurance Ride Conference) sanctioned race the weekend of Sept. 5 & 6. Horse Ranch Manager and Ride Manager Lyle Sherfey, along with his wife Teresa and 15 volunteers worked long hours on both days to provide a 25- and 50-mile race on both Saturday and Sunday along with a barbecue followed by an awards banquet each evening after completion of the races.

The races were run on a portion of Rush Creek’s land, half-way between Lisco and Oshkosh, Neb., on the south side of the highway. An entirely new course from previous years was laid out. This year’s terrain was meadows with sandy soil, high ridges, deep draws and creek crossings. Comments from racers who had attended the races in years past said it was better ground to run on this year with a wonderful campsite.

The races were vetted by Dr. Otis Schmitt from Ten Mile, Tenn., and Dr. Rich Paumer from Ogallala, Neb., along with Dr. Brandi Chytka from Oshkosh, Neb., who was there learning the ropes of endurance race vetting.

Head veterinarian Dr. Schmitt, a semi-retired, 25-year veteran of endurance race vetting has been all over the U.S. in every state but five providing his services. Dr. Paumer vetted the Big Horn 100 in Wyoming for three years and is in his third year of acting as treatment vet for the Rush Creek Reunion.

Dr. Schmitt said, “We work together and do all the checks for lameness and metabolics and if treatment is required Dr. Paumer provides that since he is licensed in the state of Nebraska.”

He continued, “I like to do this because it is a family event and the cream of the crop in racers. They listen and do what you tell them and don’t fuss about it. They don’t win any money, just bragging rights. It is a good horseman sport and they always exercise good sportsmanship by helping one another. I’m lucky I get to do these.”

Schmitt concluded by saying, “This is a unique race here at Rush Creek, it is near the small town of Lisco and it is a big ride and all of the town gets involved and helps.”

Each day the first race began at 6:30 a.m. for those who chose to compete in the 50-mile race with the 25-mile race following with a start 30 minutes later. The course was comprised of two loops. The first loop was 11.5 miles and the second 13.5. The 50-mile racers covered each loop twice while the 25-milers only ran each loop once.

Comprising the field of competitors on Saturday were three male and 15 female riders. On Sunday the gender of riders stayed roughly the same, but the total number of competitors dropped by one. Riders could compete on both days and some chose to do that. They came from the states of NE, ND, SD, WY, FL, CA and CO and represented a wide variety of occupations such as registered nurse, plastic surgeon, photographer, accountant, high school student, grade school student and vet assistant.

Riding experience ranged from this being their first endurance race to one woman who has competed since 1985. How riders got their start in endurance racing was as varied as the riders themselves. Cindy Dulaney from Castle Rock, Colo., received her Morgan horse, Xena from her husband as a wedding gift. She said, “A crazy neighbor saw us out riding and said looks like you and your horse like to go, maybe you should take up endurance racing, so we did and I fell in love with it. Xena has a huge heart and loves it too.”

Carla Hays from Greeley, Colo., rides her grulla quarter horse, Indigo and has competed for two years; she also is trying her hand at mounted shooting on him. Unfortunately Indigo had to be pulled from the 25-mile race due to a lameness issue. One horse was also pulled from the 50-mile race for lameness.

Joe Haeberle, a 14-year-old junior competitor from Laramie, Wyo., has competed for four years in the NATRC and AERC for two years. He saw the movie Hildago and was fascinated with the idea. He competes on 10-year-old Scooter. He said, “I’ve been on a horse since I was two. I really love the sport and so does my horse. It is very laid back so I just go with it and if you like to talk, that’s good because we do a lot of it on the trail. I’ve met a lot of really nice people; and the food is good! I hope to do this for a long time. I also hope to raise and train a BLM horse next.”

Every junior rider has to be accompanied by a sponsor. Haeberle’s sponsor was Kristin Lineen from Cheyenne, Wyo. She competed on a 9-year-old 1/2 Arab gelding named Snippet. She said, “I asked someone: What do you do with an Arabian horse? They told me endurance racing. So I went to the library and ordered the book, The Complete Book of Endurance Racing. I love it and my goal is to compete in six races a year.”

Ronda Eden, originally from Australia, currently from Laramie, Wyo., rode 10-year-old, Anglo/Arab, Kipling and has competed for six years. Ronda competed both days and said, “I got my start in Australia by my barefoot trimmer, and raced there for two years. It is very similar with a few differences in rules and the races are measured in kilometers. I rode standard bred horses there, but ride Arabs here, and prefer them. My wish list is to go to 10 events a year, or 20 races.”

Carla Stroh from Lusk, Wyo., rides an 11-year-old gelding named Spirit but they call him ‘Spook.’ Her husband bought the horse for her and she has run in one race a year for three years, and three races this year. “Spook is very competitive and I’ve had offers at every race to sell him. He’s not for sale. My goal is to ride in the 100-mile race – Big Horn 100 and finish. “

Sami Browneller from Palmer Lake, Colo., won the 50-mile race as well as Best Condition on Saturday riding Royal Damsal. She has competed for 10 years and said, “I started because I like to ride all day and I needed an excuse. I will ride anything I can get my hands on. I also do 3-day events.”

Rush Creek Arabians have been a presence in the Arabian world for quite a long time. Sherfey said, “The ranch has raised endurance horses for over 50 years and have between 100 and 110 horses in their band, including brood mares and stallions.

They not only raise the Arabians to race; they also contest on them. Lyn Jones, president of Rush Creek Land and Livestock also competes and rode the second day of the Rush Creek Reunion on one of the ranch’s Arabians. Sherfey has 265 endurance miles to his credit, and 160 limited distance miles riding Rush Creek horses including Rush Creek Parker, RC Quartz, RC Capper, RC Pinon and most recently RC Nerf.

RC Nerf competed in the 2009 Tevis Cup in California and placed 25th in a field of 172 horses, with only 51 percent completing the 100-mile race. Lyle was unable to race RC Nerf at the reunion because he has been sold.

Rush Creek Arabians also has the honor of having raised and owned the horse Rushcreek Hans. Sherfey said, “Rushcreek Hans still holds the all-time fastest time for the Tevis Cup race.”

The horse that won the 25-mile race on Saturday was Rushcreek Jerdee, owned and ridden by Debbie Kolegraf, from Bismark, N.D. She has ridden him for three years and also owns Rushcreek Newt.

A Best Condition award was given for each race in memory of the notable Rush Creek Arabian endurance horses, Rushcreek Mark and Rushcreek Lad. RC Lad was inducted in the AERC Hall of Fame and had over 21,000 endurance race miles to his credit. The winner’s name will be inscribed on a plate at the base of the trophy. Various other prizes were awarded at the banquet held both nights for place finishes and a turtle was awarded for those finishing last in each race.

Lyle said, “The number of riders was down this year because in past years we had trouble with the ground having a lot of gopher mounds. This year we laid out the course on higher ground and were able to get above those and didn’t have the problems on the higher, rocky ground.

“The reason we named the event the Rush Creek Reunion was to get everyone who had purchased a Rush Creek horse to come back for a reunion and ride,” Sherfey said. “I think it was very successful. We had great volunteers and a good vet crew. The banquet had wonderful pork provided by Bob Hattendorf (Garco Grillers) from Oshkosh. We didn’t have any problems and the weather cooperated by being cool for the horses to run in. Everyone really like the campsite and were happy with the ride; they said it was a good trail and well-marked. I was very happy with the turn out.”

The Rush Creek Reunion is held every year over the Labor Day weekend, so it is easy to plan for and mark on the calendar.

Results For The Rush Creek Reunion: Sept. 5, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best condition- Sami Browneller, 4h. 54m. 00s riding Royal Damsal; #2 Ronda Eden, 5h. 14m. 15s riding Kipling; #3 Lisa Baker, 5h. 28m. 32s riding SP Sarcast; #4 Carla Stroh, 5h. 28m. 35s riding Spirit; #5 Linda Browneller, 5h. 46 m. 36s riding Flash d’or; #6 Kristin Lineen, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Snippet; #7 Joe Haeberle, 6h. 28m. 00s riding Scooter.

Sept. 5, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Kolegraf, 2h. 36m. 47s riding Rushcreek Jerdee; #2 & Best Condition, Tim French, 3 h. 00m. 56s riding Senator Resolved; #3, John Haeberle, 3h. 21m. 37s riding Royal Pazazz; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3 h. 27m 14s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Patti Rooney, 3h. 28m. 27s riding Rushcreek Merle; #6 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 31m. 53s riding Kenlyn Escapade; #7 Nancy Ross, 3h. 57m. 26s riding Sarg; #8 Jeanne Beck, 4h. 25m. 19s riding Dewey; #9 Mary Snyder, 4h. 25m. 43s riding Star.

Sept. 6, 50-mile endurance ride: #1 & Best Condition Kelsey Kimbler, 5h. 40m. 56s riding HY Cimmarons Goliathe; #2 Kirsten Kimbler 5h. 40m. 57s riding Cody Canuk; #3 Hanna Pruss, 6h. 36m. 30s riding Krusader; #4 Deb Kolegraf, 6h. 36m. 32s riding Rushcreek Newt; #5 McCamey Kimbler, 6h. 36m. 34s riding Fringant.

Sept. 6, 25-mile limited distance ride: #1 Deb Karl, 2h. 45m. 37s riding Drown Majus Dee; #2 & Best condition Paschal Karl, 2h. 45m. 54s riding Dustee Seeker; #3 Patti Rooney, 3h. 38m. 08s riding Rushcreek Merle; #4 Susan Schomburg, 3h. 38m. 45s riding Coronas Crown Jewel; #5 Carol Bischoff, 3h. 48m. 36s riding Kenlyn Navigator; #6 Linda Fisher, 3h. 55m. 38s riding Kenlyn Muscatella; #7 Lyn Jones, 3h. 56m. 03s riding Rushcreek Guess; #8 Robert Bischoff, 3h. 57m. 47s riding Kenlyn Finesse; #9 Chris Compton, 4h. 16m. 34s riding Kipling; #10 Ronda Eden, 4h. 16m. 58s riding Flambeau; #11 Tessa Kimbler, 4h. 37m. 14s riding Kodee StarLite; #12 Kelly Kiimbler, 4h. 37m. 28s riding Whin Dance.