"SHOW-deo" at the Elizabeth Stampede | TheFencePost.com

"SHOW-deo" at the Elizabeth Stampede

Lincoln Rogers, Parker, Colo. Talented Colorado cowboy Josh Peek earns the fastest steer wrestling time of Saturday's matinee performance with 6.9 seconds.

“It’s not a rodeo, it’s a SHOW-deo,” proclaimed Jace Glick about the Elizabeth Stampede.

Glick ought to know, since he’s a board member and 11-year volunteer at the award winning Colorado rodeo. He and 150 volunteers put in mammoth amounts of time every year in order to make the event the best it can be. Judging by the amount of people in the stands at all four performances over the weekend – in a down economy – it appears the region’s rodeo fans like the show and keep coming back for more.

“We get the word out,” said Glick. “Right here in (this) small town, little venue, nestled up in the pine trees with that mountain backdrop, it’s picture perfect. And the people, once they come, we’ll get them back,” he added with a laugh. “We’ve got a lot of returns. I’ll bet you 60 percent of the people have been here before.”

Not only are spectators hooked on the event, competitors keep returning year after year, as well.

“I like the people around here and I like that it’s close to home and it’s cool weather – it’s kind of nice – and the hospitality is great,” said Colorado bull rider Jarrod Ford after his winning ride aboard G Force on a sun-drenched Saturday afternoon. Ford was in a good mood after the successful ride. “I haven’t stayed on one for awhile, so it was good to stay on one and to be winning it was even better,” he revealed with a smile before talking about the venue some more. “I’ve been coming here since I was little. I was probably a little pest (then) behind the chutes screwing around,” he continued with a laugh. “But I like this rodeo. It’s nice and just a good place to get away and kind of enjoy rodeo.”

Other contestants held similar opinions.

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“It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos because their ground – they rake after every barrel racer – and they have added money,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord, a fan favorite who has won the rodeo two years in a row and three out of the last four. “They have great hospitality. It’s just all around a good rodeo.”

Asked to elaborate on the hospitality aspect of the event, Lord was quick with an answer.

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” she described of tents behind the scenes serving up burgers, brats, drinks, and side dishes for cowboys and cowgirls alike. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends … some of the rodeos don’t have it so it’s an added plus when they do.”

“I tell you what, that is one of my favorite rodeos. The committee that runs that rodeo is so cool to be around,” offered Josh Peek, a talented Colorado cowboy. Peek turned in the fastest steer wrestling time of Saturday’s matinee, but wasn’t able to finish in the money for the weekend. No matter the results, however, he loves competing in Elizabeth, Colo.

“The spectators are awesome and they take good care of the cowboys,” Peek added on the topic. “When you feed and take good care of the cowboys and you welcome them into a rodeo the way that they do, people want to come back. It’s such a good circuit rodeo.”

“I love the environment,” enthused Barb Burns of Burns Rodeo Company, the outfit supplying quality stock to the venue for a good number of years. “It’s nice to go where you are appreciated and they treat you really good and they go out of their way to make you happy.”

From hospitality for contestants, sweating details such as raking between every barrel racer, and coming up with new ideas to entertain fans like bringing the PBR in on Friday night or making Sunday afternoon a “Red, White & Blue Rodeo” as a tribute to the military, the Elizabeth Stampede is always thinking of ways to provide the biggest bang for its rodeo buck.

“Our fans, contestants, vendors, our sponsors … these are our guests, and we’re trying to treat them like they are our guests,” explained Norm Almquist, President of the Elizabeth Stampede.

With 150 volunteers pulling together with that same attitude, the event starts feeling like a big weekend family reunion for thousands of people.

“It really pulls the community together,” stated Tom Walters, a local large animal veterinarian who donates his time behind the chutes on a yearly basis. “It’s a chance to see friends and families, and I enjoy it. Besides, I’m a glutton for rodeo,” he said with a laugh before offering his opinion on what makes the event so special. “This committee does an amazing job. Nowhere else do the pickup men come and say this is (their) favorite rodeo to go to because anything they want is accomplished for them or is delivered. Just mention it to a committee member and it is done,” said Walters with conviction. “This committee is prideful; they want to do the best job they can and they deliver. Absolutely.”

“It takes all of us,” summed up Glick about the pride everyone involved feels about the rodeo. “It takes the contestants, the fans, the vendors, and the sponsors. It’s neat when you can put all that together. We’re living in a world where fewer and fewer rodeos are taking place and we feel like we’re one of the last stops right here,” he added with conviction. “We’re going to continue our western heritage here. We’re proud of that.”

In other words … at the award winning Elizabeth Stampede, the SHOW-deo must go on.

“It’s not a rodeo, it’s a SHOW-deo,” proclaimed Jace Glick about the Elizabeth Stampede.

Glick ought to know, since he’s a board member and 11-year volunteer at the award winning Colorado rodeo. He and 150 volunteers put in mammoth amounts of time every year in order to make the event the best it can be. Judging by the amount of people in the stands at all four performances over the weekend – in a down economy – it appears the region’s rodeo fans like the show and keep coming back for more.

“We get the word out,” said Glick. “Right here in (this) small town, little venue, nestled up in the pine trees with that mountain backdrop, it’s picture perfect. And the people, once they come, we’ll get them back,” he added with a laugh. “We’ve got a lot of returns. I’ll bet you 60 percent of the people have been here before.”

Not only are spectators hooked on the event, competitors keep returning year after year, as well.

“I like the people around here and I like that it’s close to home and it’s cool weather – it’s kind of nice – and the hospitality is great,” said Colorado bull rider Jarrod Ford after his winning ride aboard G Force on a sun-drenched Saturday afternoon. Ford was in a good mood after the successful ride. “I haven’t stayed on one for awhile, so it was good to stay on one and to be winning it was even better,” he revealed with a smile before talking about the venue some more. “I’ve been coming here since I was little. I was probably a little pest (then) behind the chutes screwing around,” he continued with a laugh. “But I like this rodeo. It’s nice and just a good place to get away and kind of enjoy rodeo.”

Other contestants held similar opinions.

“It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos because their ground – they rake after every barrel racer – and they have added money,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord, a fan favorite who has won the rodeo two years in a row and three out of the last four. “They have great hospitality. It’s just all around a good rodeo.”

Asked to elaborate on the hospitality aspect of the event, Lord was quick with an answer.

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” she described of tents behind the scenes serving up burgers, brats, drinks, and side dishes for cowboys and cowgirls alike. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends … some of the rodeos don’t have it so it’s an added plus when they do.”

“I tell you what, that is one of my favorite rodeos. The committee that runs that rodeo is so cool to be around,” offered Josh Peek, a talented Colorado cowboy. Peek turned in the fastest steer wrestling time of Saturday’s matinee, but wasn’t able to finish in the money for the weekend. No matter the results, however, he loves competing in Elizabeth, Colo.

“The spectators are awesome and they take good care of the cowboys,” Peek added on the topic. “When you feed and take good care of the cowboys and you welcome them into a rodeo the way that they do, people want to come back. It’s such a good circuit rodeo.”

“I love the environment,” enthused Barb Burns of Burns Rodeo Company, the outfit supplying quality stock to the venue for a good number of years. “It’s nice to go where you are appreciated and they treat you really good and they go out of their way to make you happy.”

From hospitality for contestants, sweating details such as raking between every barrel racer, and coming up with new ideas to entertain fans like bringing the PBR in on Friday night or making Sunday afternoon a “Red, White & Blue Rodeo” as a tribute to the military, the Elizabeth Stampede is always thinking of ways to provide the biggest bang for its rodeo buck.

“Our fans, contestants, vendors, our sponsors … these are our guests, and we’re trying to treat them like they are our guests,” explained Norm Almquist, President of the Elizabeth Stampede.

With 150 volunteers pulling together with that same attitude, the event starts feeling like a big weekend family reunion for thousands of people.

“It really pulls the community together,” stated Tom Walters, a local large animal veterinarian who donates his time behind the chutes on a yearly basis. “It’s a chance to see friends and families, and I enjoy it. Besides, I’m a glutton for rodeo,” he said with a laugh before offering his opinion on what makes the event so special. “This committee does an amazing job. Nowhere else do the pickup men come and say this is (their) favorite rodeo to go to because anything they want is accomplished for them or is delivered. Just mention it to a committee member and it is done,” said Walters with conviction. “This committee is prideful; they want to do the best job they can and they deliver. Absolutely.”

“It takes all of us,” summed up Glick about the pride everyone involved feels about the rodeo. “It takes the contestants, the fans, the vendors, and the sponsors. It’s neat when you can put all that together. We’re living in a world where fewer and fewer rodeos are taking place and we feel like we’re one of the last stops right here,” he added with conviction. “We’re going to continue our western heritage here. We’re proud of that.”

In other words … at the award winning Elizabeth Stampede, the SHOW-deo must go on.