Simplify holiday baking | TheFencePost.com

Simplify holiday baking

Anna Aughenbaugh
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

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Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.

Our family much prefers homemade cookies over store bought, but they don’t care for fancy ones that look pretty, but lack good taste. When time is lacking, but I still want to have cookies for friends and family, I have resorted to making bar cookies. They can be cut into geometrical shapes, sprinkled with colored sugar or spread with icing. The kitchen will be filled with delicious aroma and the cookie tins filled with far less effort, leaving me with energy to write the Christmas cards.

Baking with children requires patience, but the memories they make are worth it. Be sure to snap some photos. There will be distractions, so read the recipe, then set out the ingredients in the order they will be needed. Little ones can help to spread the batter in the pan and sprinkle it with sugar. When the cookies are cool, they can stack them into tins, or on plates. Talk about the friends who they can deliver them to after they are wrapped in foil and tied with a red ribbon.

Beat eggs into dough one at a time, but don’t beat until fluffy. Mix in dry ingredients just until the flour disappears into the dough. Line baking sheets with parchment paper, silicone baking mats or greased aluminum foil. Be sure to cool baking sheets between batches and remove just baked cookies with a large spatula onto wire racks to allow air to circulate around cookies so their bottoms don’t get soggy. Pack crispy and soft cookies in separate containers, or they will all get soft. Cut bars with a sharp straight edge knife. Dip knife into hot water and wipe it off between cuts.