Stampede rodeo: Dylan Werner makes deposits on future at jewelry store, rodeo ring | TheFencePost.com

Stampede rodeo: Dylan Werner makes deposits on future at jewelry store, rodeo ring

Samuel G. Mustari
Greeley, Colo.

JIM RYDBOM/jrydbom@greeleytribune.comBull rider Dylan Werner holds on as the bull jumps in the air Tuesday at the Greeley Stampede. Werner won the go-round with an 85.

Dylan Werner spent Tuesday afternoon in a jewelry store. By the time the sun had set, he was riding bulls.

You see, Werner’s in love – with his soon-to-be fiancee Tiffany Massey – and bull riding.

With any luck and more than enough talent, Werner plans to be hooked up with both for a long time.

For the record: He went to Jared.

To be able to pay the bill at Jared, Werner posted an 85 in the bull riding competition at the Greeley Stampede at Island Grove Arena and a good bet to return for Sunday’s finals.

“I’m a rookie, so to be able to make money here would be nice,” Werner said just before stock contractor Bennie Beutler walked by and offered an atta boy – “Great ride, I’m glad you came and we’ll see you on Sunday.”

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Like any veteran, Werner will drive all night to Salt Lake City, then catch a plane to St. Paul, Ore., for another rodeo.

In between, he’ll swing by Denver International Airport to drop off his future bride for a flight home to Bushnell, Fla.

“I’m ready for this, I really am. I’m good to go,” said Massey, who competed with Werner in high school, and has been on his arm for eight years.

Werner won the national high school bareback riding title in 2006 then attended and competed for Ranger (Texas) College for two seasons.

“I went there just to rodeo,” Werner said. “That’s about all they have.”

As a PRCA rookie and a soon-to-be newlywed, Werner, 21, is watching his money closely and familiarizing himself with the demanding travel schedule and luck of the draw.

“I know all about the injuries,” he explained. “I’ve been injured at times since I was 18 years old. Broken thumbs and lots of hyperextensions. You learn to ride through the injuries.”

The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association press guide lists Werner’s career earnings as 0. Nada. Not a dime. He has won three times – at the Northwest Florida Championships in Bonifay, Fla., the Rodeo of the Mid-South in Southhaven, Miss., and the Guadalupe County Fair & Rodeo in Seguin, Texas.

“I spent $3,500 last week though with entry fees for this rodeo and all the others I’ll compete in during July,” Werner said. “Anything I win will get deposited right into the bank. You have to eat a good steak once in awhile though. Dollar menus at McDonald’s and Taco Bell can get kind of old.”

In between competition, he works construction for his fiancee’s family construction business – Massey Construction in Perry, Fla.

“I’ve won about $26,000 so far, but the last few weeks have been real slow,” Werner said. “I did pick up about $1,000 last week in Pecos, Texas, but I know I have to stay on a budget. I figure that every time you stay on the bull, you should make money.”

Werner’s $28,277 in earnings this season have him ranked No. 20 overall and No. 1 among rookie bull riders.

“Ideally, I’d like to make enough to build my own home and have a little ranch right outside the door with cows,” Werner said.

By comparison, bull riding veteran Myron Duarte has his house in Auburn, Wash., paid for. He has piled up $926,000 in career earnings with eight National Finals Rodeo appearances to show for his efforts, including a second-place NFR finish in 2002.

He bettered Werner by two points – 87 – to sit atop the standings and a good bet to qualify for Sunday’s finals.

“I’m not sure I’ll come back though,” Duarte said. “I’m scheduled for two other rodeos that day, have good draws and a better chance to win more money in those two rodeos. We’ll see.”

With his future secure, Duarte is confident that his sponsor will eventually be his main employer.

His best year in terms of earnings?

“Last year, and I didn’t win a dime,” Duarte, 42 said. “I traveled and represented my sponsor (Piiholo Ranch in Hawaii) and helped raise horses and did some roping. I needed a break.”

Duarte doesn’t forsee retiring anytime soon, but had good advice for his rookie competitor, Werner.

“Hook up with a veteran,” Duarte said. “They know how to compete and when to be up, how to get after it when you draw a good bull.

“You know, it’s feast or famine in this sport, and I’ve experienced both. For the new guy (Werner), he’ll figure that out. Security isn’t something that goes along with what we do, but it sounds like he’s doing all right.”

Dylan Werner spent Tuesday afternoon in a jewelry store. By the time the sun had set, he was riding bulls.

You see, Werner’s in love – with his soon-to-be fiancee Tiffany Massey – and bull riding.

With any luck and more than enough talent, Werner plans to be hooked up with both for a long time.

For the record: He went to Jared.

To be able to pay the bill at Jared, Werner posted an 85 in the bull riding competition at the Greeley Stampede at Island Grove Arena and a good bet to return for Sunday’s finals.

“I’m a rookie, so to be able to make money here would be nice,” Werner said just before stock contractor Bennie Beutler walked by and offered an atta boy – “Great ride, I’m glad you came and we’ll see you on Sunday.”

Like any veteran, Werner will drive all night to Salt Lake City, then catch a plane to St. Paul, Ore., for another rodeo.

In between, he’ll swing by Denver International Airport to drop off his future bride for a flight home to Bushnell, Fla.

“I’m ready for this, I really am. I’m good to go,” said Massey, who competed with Werner in high school, and has been on his arm for eight years.

Werner won the national high school bareback riding title in 2006 then attended and competed for Ranger (Texas) College for two seasons.

“I went there just to rodeo,” Werner said. “That’s about all they have.”

As a PRCA rookie and a soon-to-be newlywed, Werner, 21, is watching his money closely and familiarizing himself with the demanding travel schedule and luck of the draw.

“I know all about the injuries,” he explained. “I’ve been injured at times since I was 18 years old. Broken thumbs and lots of hyperextensions. You learn to ride through the injuries.”

The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association press guide lists Werner’s career earnings as 0. Nada. Not a dime. He has won three times – at the Northwest Florida Championships in Bonifay, Fla., the Rodeo of the Mid-South in Southhaven, Miss., and the Guadalupe County Fair & Rodeo in Seguin, Texas.

“I spent $3,500 last week though with entry fees for this rodeo and all the others I’ll compete in during July,” Werner said. “Anything I win will get deposited right into the bank. You have to eat a good steak once in awhile though. Dollar menus at McDonald’s and Taco Bell can get kind of old.”

In between competition, he works construction for his fiancee’s family construction business – Massey Construction in Perry, Fla.

“I’ve won about $26,000 so far, but the last few weeks have been real slow,” Werner said. “I did pick up about $1,000 last week in Pecos, Texas, but I know I have to stay on a budget. I figure that every time you stay on the bull, you should make money.”

Werner’s $28,277 in earnings this season have him ranked No. 20 overall and No. 1 among rookie bull riders.

“Ideally, I’d like to make enough to build my own home and have a little ranch right outside the door with cows,” Werner said.

By comparison, bull riding veteran Myron Duarte has his house in Auburn, Wash., paid for. He has piled up $926,000 in career earnings with eight National Finals Rodeo appearances to show for his efforts, including a second-place NFR finish in 2002.

He bettered Werner by two points – 87 – to sit atop the standings and a good bet to qualify for Sunday’s finals.

“I’m not sure I’ll come back though,” Duarte said. “I’m scheduled for two other rodeos that day, have good draws and a better chance to win more money in those two rodeos. We’ll see.”

With his future secure, Duarte is confident that his sponsor will eventually be his main employer.

His best year in terms of earnings?

“Last year, and I didn’t win a dime,” Duarte, 42 said. “I traveled and represented my sponsor (Piiholo Ranch in Hawaii) and helped raise horses and did some roping. I needed a break.”

Duarte doesn’t forsee retiring anytime soon, but had good advice for his rookie competitor, Werner.

“Hook up with a veteran,” Duarte said. “They know how to compete and when to be up, how to get after it when you draw a good bull.

“You know, it’s feast or famine in this sport, and I’ve experienced both. For the new guy (Werner), he’ll figure that out. Security isn’t something that goes along with what we do, but it sounds like he’s doing all right.”