Tales from the O-NO Ranch 9-28-09 | TheFencePost.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Tales from the O-NO Ranch 9-28-09

Mad Jack Hanks
Wellington, Colo.

As I drove in to go swimming in the cement pond this morning there was a steady cold rain falling. It was wet and cold. I need the moisture here at my place pretty badly so I am not fussing about getting some moisture. Getting into the cement pond this morning, gentle readers, of course was wet and initially cold. After a few laps you begin to get warm as in

doing any exercise, so it just wasn’t

all that cold.

There’s something about out past experiences that cause us to reflect on certain aspects of our lives. For example: I remember boot camp at Fort Chaffee, Ark., in January. It was wet and cold. Our old barracks were used to house prisoners during the Second World War. They were cold at best on a cold wet night in the Arkansas hills.

Funny how we reflect back to make comparisons on things in the past that are lodged in our memory. I remember being out a’horseback in the wheat pastures of that central Texas ranch looking for sick steers that needed a boost to overcome pneumonia or what ever. There was that one day when it was overcast, drizzling rain, constant rain, and the temperature was just above freezing. I was so cold I was shaking, my horse was shaking and

the cattle had gathered in bunches

with their butts to the wind and they were shaking. Makes it a little hard to spot the sick ones when they all have their heads down, noses running and shaking all over.

You don’t have a lot of inspiration to get hold of a cold, wet rope and try to catch a steer that you quickly discover can almost outrun your pony. Oooops, that one wasn’t all that sick if he was sick at all! That seems to be the way it turns out when everyone and everything is wet and cold. At the end of the day you have managed to rope and doctor the really sick ones that you found and you are pleased with yourself that you did your job and those ole steers were gonna’ get through a cold and wet spell because you put out

the effort.

When I was out in the cold a’horseback in that ole wet, muddy and slick ground, I sometimes would reflect back on those wet and cold days trying to march up a muddy trail with a full backpack and rifle in the Arkansas hills. It made it a little easier to digest, but that’s the way it works. Hard tough times build character and the tougher those times are the tougher we become in handling most of life’s difficult surprises. I’m really glad that I had to endure those times as they have helped me adjust my armor when the battles loomed in the distance. I’m also glad that at this point in my life I just don’t have to go out and get wet and cold unless it’s of my choosing.

September is almost gone and wet and cold is right around the corner. If you have to get out in it, treat it as a badge of honor, it will serve you well

in later life.

Stay tuned, check yer cinch on occasion and I’ll c. ya.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User