The Alamo – remembering its past | TheFencePost.com

The Alamo – remembering its past

Fred Hendricks
Bucyrus, Ohio

The Alamo is one of the most visited historic sites in Texas.

The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.

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The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.

The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.

The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.

The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.

The Alamo was originally named Mision San Antonio de Valero when construction first started in 1724. It served as home to missionaries and their Indian converts for almost 70 years. Spanish officials secularized the five missions around San Antonio and divided their land among the remaining Indian occupants. These residents worked the land and participated in the growth of San Antonio.

In early 1800 the Spanish military stationed a cavalry at the former mission. The soldiers referred to the former mission as the Alamo (Spanish word for cottonwood) in honor of their hometown, Alamo de Parras, Coahuila. The military – Spanish, Rebel, and then Mexican – occupied the Alamo until the Texas Revolution.

The Alamo and the community of San Antonio were critical players in the Texas revolution. In December 1835, Ben Milam led Texan and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in the city. Following five days of fighting they forced General Marin Perfecto de Cos and his band of followers to surrender. The victorious volunteers then occupied the Alamo.

On Feb. 23, 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna arrived outside San Antonio. Undaunted, the Texian and Tejanos troops fought together to defend the Alamo. They held out 13 days against the onslaught of Santa Anna’s army. Couriers were sent out to neighboring communities appealing for support to defend the Alamo. A band of 32 arrived from Gonzales; bring the total to nearly two hundred. The defenders knew the Alamo was a key to the defense of Texas and they were willing to die for the cause. Among the Alamo’s bulwark were Jim Bowie, well-known knife fighter and David Crockett, famed frontiersman and former congressman from Tennessee.

The final assault by Santa Anna’s troops came before daybreak on the morning of March 6, 1836. The Alamo defenders held off several attacks until Santa Anna’s huge brigades numbering several thousand scaled the walls. They completely overtook the interior and killed the fort’s gallant fighters. By sunrise, the battle had ended. Santa Anna entered the Alamo barracks to survey the destruction and his victory.

Still today, facts surrounding the siege of the Alamo are debated. There is no question; however, the Alamo is the place where men made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. And for this reason, the Alamo remains hallowed ground. The Daughters of the Republic of Texas are dedicated to the preservation of the Alamo as a sacred memorial to the Alamo Defenders.