The Historic Beaumont Hotel | TheFencePost.com

The Historic Beaumont Hotel

Carolyn White
Olathe, Colo.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

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The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.

Jennifer Wyrick and Chad Leaver knew that they’d found something special when they first walked through the colorful, stained-glass doors of the Beaumont Hotel in Ouray, Colo., this June. In town for a weekend getaway – and unhappy with the hotel that had been booked over the Internet – they’d started wandering: within three days, that long weekend had turned into a business development.

Everywhere the pair went, they’d heard that the historic building was for sale. “It was very quiet that day, so we got a private tour,” Jennifer explained as we sat in a plush, elegant parlor. After 15 years in Colorado Springs, both knew that they wanted to try something different. For Chad, who grew up outside of Boulder, Colo., and Jennifer, who is originally from Houston, Texas., it was the perfect choice.

Established in 1886 when the town was still a rough, dusty mining camp, the Beaumont (which translates to “beautiful mountain”) was the brainstorm of five leading Ouray citizens who had high hopes for the future of the 10-year-old town. Their hunches paid off when a hospital, bank, courthouse, and railroad soon followed, along with the Wright Opera House, built across the street. After it opened, guests could walk to attend its musical programs, concerts and dramas. By the turn of the century, the beautiful hotel had become the hub of society with its own parties, balls, parlor music events and solo singers. Guests were often written about in the local paper, along with details of their formal attire – satin, silk, lace, and diamonds.

Created by architect O. Bulow, the impressive, Gothic structure has tower gables; a mansard roof; and wide oaken stairways with solid brass inlays in the corners of each step. The uniquely-styled atrium “gives the interior the feel of a riverboat,” says employee Cody Willis, and an enormous skylight reflects the sun three stories down, all the way to the lobby. Panoramic views of Mount Abrams, Mount Hayden, and Whitehouse Mountain can be seen from the windows.

After going through a number of managers through 1964, the grand old lady was finally closed, standing empty for over 30 years (and narrowly escaping being torn down) before being purchased at auction in 1998 by summer residents from San Antonio, Texas, Dr. and Mrs. Dan King. Hiring hundreds of workers to burn and scrape off old paint; replace plumbing and wiring; repair deteriorating bricks and mortar; and restore wooden window sashes, they painstakingly brought the Beaumont back to life.

“The entire process took about five years, and NO expense was spared … even the wallpaper patterns are authentic,” Jennifer and Chad said. “Seventeen layers were peeled off until the bottom layer was reached. As it turned out, the California manufacturer was still in existence, so the actual patterns were reproduced.”

The warm, rich hues of gold, tan, forest green and deep red are the main colors in each of the antiques-filled suites – 12, total – of the hotel. (In the early days, there had been 40 or so small “cubicles,” with one commode per floor.) One of the largest is the Tower Room, the tip of which can be seen from the outside. Along with its Morse chairs (the original style of recliner) wrought-iron, Queen-sized bed, and abundance of natural daylight, it also has a spiral staircase which leads to a sitting area with sofa, chairs, TV, DVD, minibar, and microwave.

All of the rooms have something special to offer, from Tiffany-style lamps to ornate couches and end tables to claw foot bath tubs. As an added touch, you’ll find an abundance of toiletries plus thick, fragrant towels in the bathrooms. And don’t expect to hang your clothes in mere closets: instead, most of the bedrooms have armoires, and inside each one you’ll find white, terry bathrobes.

The robes will come in handy if you decide to head up to the Spa, which is located on the third floor. Within a half-dozen, cozy alcoves – each decorated with paintings, tapestries, enormous vases, and plants – one can relax to a private manicure, pedicure, aromatherapy treatment, or sauna. All services are by appointment only, and are open to the public with or without a hotel stay. “A natural waterfall can be enjoyed while one is sitting in the hot tub,” he continued, pointing out a window. “We even offer Japanese-style massages.”

In addition to the Spa, within the walls of the Beaumont one will find a top-notch restaurant and bar, “Bulow’s Bistro.” (Guests are served a complimentary breakfast there each morning). Buckskin Booksellers, which boasts a section of the original pressed-tin ceiling, offers a wide variety of books, magazines and paintings, while the North Moon Gallery carries items that are indigenous to Colorado – a tasteful mix of jewelry, artwork and glass. Finally, for those of you who visit Ouray, fall in love with it, and want to stay, yes, there’s also a Real Estate office.

But the BEST way to get a close-up look at the town and its surroundings? Book a stay at the Beaumont just for the romance of it like Jennifer and Chad, who will marry there in the spring. “People get married on the staircase or in the beautiful court yard and have their reception in the Grand Ballroom all the time,” according to Jennifer. “It’s inclusive. Entire families can have the place completely to themselves for the big weekend.” And what a place to start new memories: the Beaumont is a grand and elegant reminder of times gone by.