The Junior Livestock Auction at NWSS is all about kids, agriculture and education | TheFencePost.com

The Junior Livestock Auction at NWSS is all about kids, agriculture and education

Left to Right are Robert Blankenship, COO of the Denver C of C: Paul Andrews, President and CEO of the NWSS; Bill Lindsey, Chairman of the Board of the Denver C of C; Kelly Brough, President and CEO of the Denver C of C; and Brock May, owner of "Ricky Bobby. "Ricky Bobby" is in front at 1,315 pounds and Grand Champion Steer at the Jr. Livestock Auction.

The Beef Palace Auction Arena at the National Western Stock Show was filled to overflowing for the auction of the Junior Livestock Champions. Ninety Seven Champions were chosen from the 1900 entries in beef, lambs, hogs and goats.

Denver NBC Channel 9 has been broadcasting the live auction of the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion for steers, lambs and hogs for the past 10 years. They bill it as “the fastest half hour on TV,” and it lives up to it’s billing. The auctioneers “sold!” is still ringing through the arena when the two 9News anchors start their interviews of the owner of the animal and the winning bidder. Then the frantic pace begins again until the six champions have been sold.

Kathy Sabine, Channel 9 Chief Meteorologist, and true cowgirl, says “I’ve been doing the Junior Livestock Auction for about 10 years, ever since Channel 9 started doing it. I first co-hosted with Ed Green, then Mark Koebrich, and now with Greg Moss. They like me here at the Stock Show because I have a degree in Ag Business.”

The Junior Livestock Auction is all about the kids, agriculture and education, and it is a sentiment that you hear over and over from the bidders and every one at the National Western. Greg Moss of Channel 9 says, “The money is all going to help kids continue their education, which makes it that much more special. Ten percent of the sale goes back to the National Western Scholarship Fund and that gets dispersed to kids all over the state of Colorado.” Moss continued, “The rest, 90 percent, goes to the person who raised the animal. In some cases, that is a lot of money. We’ve seen kids come through here where this pays for their entire college education and you will just see them break down in tears. It’s pure emotion.”

The kids put a lot into this. They can get attached to their animals, so sometimes the tears are a mixture of sadness and joy. Sadness because, as Justin Cummins of the Executive Livestock Committee put it, “This is a market show. It’s what you call a ‘terminal show’ as all of the animals are headed to the packing plant. This meat will be in the food chain within a week or so.”

The televised portion of the Junior Livestock Auction kicked of with the Reserve Grand Champion Hog exhibited by 9-year-old Lydia Straka of Yukon, Okla. Lydia’s entry, named ‘RD’ was a crossbred hog that weighed in at 272 pounds. By tradition, the wining bid from the previous year started the bidding. Karen Kuchar of Emil-Lenes Sirloin House started the bidding off at $4,500. Some furious bidding took that up to the winning bid which was submitted by the Colorado Business Bank of $10,000. Bob Ostertag said of his winning bid, “Colorado Business Bank has been doing this for 15 years and we are proud to do it again.”

Recommended Stories For You

The Grant and Morris families opened the bidding for the 2011 Grand Champion Hog at $8,000 and eventually won the bid at $11,000. Eighteen-year-old Drey Marceaux of Kaplan, La., showed his 279 pound Yorkshire Hog and plans to attend LSU and major in agriculture. The Grant and Morris families also bought the 2010 Grand Champion Hog and said, “We are proud to do it and we are planting the seed for future generations.”

Next up were the lambs and 12-year-old Tyler Cox of Hobbs, N.M., presented his Reserve Grand Champion market Lamb. This was Tyler’s first time at the NWSS and he made a good first impression. Colorado Business Bank started the bidding at $6,000 and Traurig-Greenberg made the winning bid of $10,000.

The Grand Champion Lamb was shown by 17-year-old Justin Willoughby from Sheridan, Iowa. The winning bid of $15,000 was made by Jeff Keller of APC Construction.

Next came the steers. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer was 1,317 pound ‘Ram Jam’ shown by Kaiti Robinson of Conroe, Texas. Kaiti is 17-years-old and plans to attend Texas AM and major in Animal Communication. George Eidsness of Transwest Trucks made the winning bid of $33,000 and said, “When you look at this young group of kids that come in here and what they represent – and the hard work that they do – we are just honored to be able to come out and support the program and support the Scholarship Fund and everything that it stands for.”

The Grand Champion Steer was raised by Brock May of Mineral Point, Wis. No stranger to the Junior Livestock Auction, 17-year-old May was also the Reserve Grand Champion in 2007. Emil-Lenes Sirloin House opened the bidding at $20,000. The bidding was intense on the 1,315 pound steer before the winning bid of $50,000 was made by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

The Junior Livestock Auction is a major source of funding for the NWSS Scholarship Fund. “About $300,000 will go to students that will be majoring in Agriculture, Rural Medicine and Veterinary Sciences.” said Andrea Miller, the Scholarship Coordinator for the National Western, “The scholarship money is very important as it helps them succeed and not have to worry about other things while they are in school.”

Kathy Sabine of 9News summed up the event by saying, “Over the years we have had some life changing moments here. It’s a great night. It is great for the kids that we are furthering their education in agriculture. It’s a great event to be part of and I’m thrilled to be here.”

The Beef Palace Auction Arena at the National Western Stock Show was filled to overflowing for the auction of the Junior Livestock Champions. Ninety Seven Champions were chosen from the 1900 entries in beef, lambs, hogs and goats.

Denver NBC Channel 9 has been broadcasting the live auction of the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion for steers, lambs and hogs for the past 10 years. They bill it as “the fastest half hour on TV,” and it lives up to it’s billing. The auctioneers “sold!” is still ringing through the arena when the two 9News anchors start their interviews of the owner of the animal and the winning bidder. Then the frantic pace begins again until the six champions have been sold.

Kathy Sabine, Channel 9 Chief Meteorologist, and true cowgirl, says “I’ve been doing the Junior Livestock Auction for about 10 years, ever since Channel 9 started doing it. I first co-hosted with Ed Green, then Mark Koebrich, and now with Greg Moss. They like me here at the Stock Show because I have a degree in Ag Business.”

The Junior Livestock Auction is all about the kids, agriculture and education, and it is a sentiment that you hear over and over from the bidders and every one at the National Western. Greg Moss of Channel 9 says, “The money is all going to help kids continue their education, which makes it that much more special. Ten percent of the sale goes back to the National Western Scholarship Fund and that gets dispersed to kids all over the state of Colorado.” Moss continued, “The rest, 90 percent, goes to the person who raised the animal. In some cases, that is a lot of money. We’ve seen kids come through here where this pays for their entire college education and you will just see them break down in tears. It’s pure emotion.”

The kids put a lot into this. They can get attached to their animals, so sometimes the tears are a mixture of sadness and joy. Sadness because, as Justin Cummins of the Executive Livestock Committee put it, “This is a market show. It’s what you call a ‘terminal show’ as all of the animals are headed to the packing plant. This meat will be in the food chain within a week or so.”

The televised portion of the Junior Livestock Auction kicked of with the Reserve Grand Champion Hog exhibited by 9-year-old Lydia Straka of Yukon, Okla. Lydia’s entry, named ‘RD’ was a crossbred hog that weighed in at 272 pounds. By tradition, the wining bid from the previous year started the bidding. Karen Kuchar of Emil-Lenes Sirloin House started the bidding off at $4,500. Some furious bidding took that up to the winning bid which was submitted by the Colorado Business Bank of $10,000. Bob Ostertag said of his winning bid, “Colorado Business Bank has been doing this for 15 years and we are proud to do it again.”

The Grant and Morris families opened the bidding for the 2011 Grand Champion Hog at $8,000 and eventually won the bid at $11,000. Eighteen-year-old Drey Marceaux of Kaplan, La., showed his 279 pound Yorkshire Hog and plans to attend LSU and major in agriculture. The Grant and Morris families also bought the 2010 Grand Champion Hog and said, “We are proud to do it and we are planting the seed for future generations.”

Next up were the lambs and 12-year-old Tyler Cox of Hobbs, N.M., presented his Reserve Grand Champion market Lamb. This was Tyler’s first time at the NWSS and he made a good first impression. Colorado Business Bank started the bidding at $6,000 and Traurig-Greenberg made the winning bid of $10,000.

The Grand Champion Lamb was shown by 17-year-old Justin Willoughby from Sheridan, Iowa. The winning bid of $15,000 was made by Jeff Keller of APC Construction.

Next came the steers. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer was 1,317 pound ‘Ram Jam’ shown by Kaiti Robinson of Conroe, Texas. Kaiti is 17-years-old and plans to attend Texas AM and major in Animal Communication. George Eidsness of Transwest Trucks made the winning bid of $33,000 and said, “When you look at this young group of kids that come in here and what they represent – and the hard work that they do – we are just honored to be able to come out and support the program and support the Scholarship Fund and everything that it stands for.”

The Grand Champion Steer was raised by Brock May of Mineral Point, Wis. No stranger to the Junior Livestock Auction, 17-year-old May was also the Reserve Grand Champion in 2007. Emil-Lenes Sirloin House opened the bidding at $20,000. The bidding was intense on the 1,315 pound steer before the winning bid of $50,000 was made by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

The Junior Livestock Auction is a major source of funding for the NWSS Scholarship Fund. “About $300,000 will go to students that will be majoring in Agriculture, Rural Medicine and Veterinary Sciences.” said Andrea Miller, the Scholarship Coordinator for the National Western, “The scholarship money is very important as it helps them succeed and not have to worry about other things while they are in school.”

Kathy Sabine of 9News summed up the event by saying, “Over the years we have had some life changing moments here. It’s a great night. It is great for the kids that we are furthering their education in agriculture. It’s a great event to be part of and I’m thrilled to be here.”

The Beef Palace Auction Arena at the National Western Stock Show was filled to overflowing for the auction of the Junior Livestock Champions. Ninety Seven Champions were chosen from the 1900 entries in beef, lambs, hogs and goats.

Denver NBC Channel 9 has been broadcasting the live auction of the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion for steers, lambs and hogs for the past 10 years. They bill it as “the fastest half hour on TV,” and it lives up to it’s billing. The auctioneers “sold!” is still ringing through the arena when the two 9News anchors start their interviews of the owner of the animal and the winning bidder. Then the frantic pace begins again until the six champions have been sold.

Kathy Sabine, Channel 9 Chief Meteorologist, and true cowgirl, says “I’ve been doing the Junior Livestock Auction for about 10 years, ever since Channel 9 started doing it. I first co-hosted with Ed Green, then Mark Koebrich, and now with Greg Moss. They like me here at the Stock Show because I have a degree in Ag Business.”

The Junior Livestock Auction is all about the kids, agriculture and education, and it is a sentiment that you hear over and over from the bidders and every one at the National Western. Greg Moss of Channel 9 says, “The money is all going to help kids continue their education, which makes it that much more special. Ten percent of the sale goes back to the National Western Scholarship Fund and that gets dispersed to kids all over the state of Colorado.” Moss continued, “The rest, 90 percent, goes to the person who raised the animal. In some cases, that is a lot of money. We’ve seen kids come through here where this pays for their entire college education and you will just see them break down in tears. It’s pure emotion.”

The kids put a lot into this. They can get attached to their animals, so sometimes the tears are a mixture of sadness and joy. Sadness because, as Justin Cummins of the Executive Livestock Committee put it, “This is a market show. It’s what you call a ‘terminal show’ as all of the animals are headed to the packing plant. This meat will be in the food chain within a week or so.”

The televised portion of the Junior Livestock Auction kicked of with the Reserve Grand Champion Hog exhibited by 9-year-old Lydia Straka of Yukon, Okla. Lydia’s entry, named ‘RD’ was a crossbred hog that weighed in at 272 pounds. By tradition, the wining bid from the previous year started the bidding. Karen Kuchar of Emil-Lenes Sirloin House started the bidding off at $4,500. Some furious bidding took that up to the winning bid which was submitted by the Colorado Business Bank of $10,000. Bob Ostertag said of his winning bid, “Colorado Business Bank has been doing this for 15 years and we are proud to do it again.”

The Grant and Morris families opened the bidding for the 2011 Grand Champion Hog at $8,000 and eventually won the bid at $11,000. Eighteen-year-old Drey Marceaux of Kaplan, La., showed his 279 pound Yorkshire Hog and plans to attend LSU and major in agriculture. The Grant and Morris families also bought the 2010 Grand Champion Hog and said, “We are proud to do it and we are planting the seed for future generations.”

Next up were the lambs and 12-year-old Tyler Cox of Hobbs, N.M., presented his Reserve Grand Champion market Lamb. This was Tyler’s first time at the NWSS and he made a good first impression. Colorado Business Bank started the bidding at $6,000 and Traurig-Greenberg made the winning bid of $10,000.

The Grand Champion Lamb was shown by 17-year-old Justin Willoughby from Sheridan, Iowa. The winning bid of $15,000 was made by Jeff Keller of APC Construction.

Next came the steers. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer was 1,317 pound ‘Ram Jam’ shown by Kaiti Robinson of Conroe, Texas. Kaiti is 17-years-old and plans to attend Texas AM and major in Animal Communication. George Eidsness of Transwest Trucks made the winning bid of $33,000 and said, “When you look at this young group of kids that come in here and what they represent – and the hard work that they do – we are just honored to be able to come out and support the program and support the Scholarship Fund and everything that it stands for.”

The Grand Champion Steer was raised by Brock May of Mineral Point, Wis. No stranger to the Junior Livestock Auction, 17-year-old May was also the Reserve Grand Champion in 2007. Emil-Lenes Sirloin House opened the bidding at $20,000. The bidding was intense on the 1,315 pound steer before the winning bid of $50,000 was made by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

The Junior Livestock Auction is a major source of funding for the NWSS Scholarship Fund. “About $300,000 will go to students that will be majoring in Agriculture, Rural Medicine and Veterinary Sciences.” said Andrea Miller, the Scholarship Coordinator for the National Western, “The scholarship money is very important as it helps them succeed and not have to worry about other things while they are in school.”

Kathy Sabine of 9News summed up the event by saying, “Over the years we have had some life changing moments here. It’s a great night. It is great for the kids that we are furthering their education in agriculture. It’s a great event to be part of and I’m thrilled to be here.”

The Beef Palace Auction Arena at the National Western Stock Show was filled to overflowing for the auction of the Junior Livestock Champions. Ninety Seven Champions were chosen from the 1900 entries in beef, lambs, hogs and goats.

Denver NBC Channel 9 has been broadcasting the live auction of the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion for steers, lambs and hogs for the past 10 years. They bill it as “the fastest half hour on TV,” and it lives up to it’s billing. The auctioneers “sold!” is still ringing through the arena when the two 9News anchors start their interviews of the owner of the animal and the winning bidder. Then the frantic pace begins again until the six champions have been sold.

Kathy Sabine, Channel 9 Chief Meteorologist, and true cowgirl, says “I’ve been doing the Junior Livestock Auction for about 10 years, ever since Channel 9 started doing it. I first co-hosted with Ed Green, then Mark Koebrich, and now with Greg Moss. They like me here at the Stock Show because I have a degree in Ag Business.”

The Junior Livestock Auction is all about the kids, agriculture and education, and it is a sentiment that you hear over and over from the bidders and every one at the National Western. Greg Moss of Channel 9 says, “The money is all going to help kids continue their education, which makes it that much more special. Ten percent of the sale goes back to the National Western Scholarship Fund and that gets dispersed to kids all over the state of Colorado.” Moss continued, “The rest, 90 percent, goes to the person who raised the animal. In some cases, that is a lot of money. We’ve seen kids come through here where this pays for their entire college education and you will just see them break down in tears. It’s pure emotion.”

The kids put a lot into this. They can get attached to their animals, so sometimes the tears are a mixture of sadness and joy. Sadness because, as Justin Cummins of the Executive Livestock Committee put it, “This is a market show. It’s what you call a ‘terminal show’ as all of the animals are headed to the packing plant. This meat will be in the food chain within a week or so.”

The televised portion of the Junior Livestock Auction kicked of with the Reserve Grand Champion Hog exhibited by 9-year-old Lydia Straka of Yukon, Okla. Lydia’s entry, named ‘RD’ was a crossbred hog that weighed in at 272 pounds. By tradition, the wining bid from the previous year started the bidding. Karen Kuchar of Emil-Lenes Sirloin House started the bidding off at $4,500. Some furious bidding took that up to the winning bid which was submitted by the Colorado Business Bank of $10,000. Bob Ostertag said of his winning bid, “Colorado Business Bank has been doing this for 15 years and we are proud to do it again.”

The Grant and Morris families opened the bidding for the 2011 Grand Champion Hog at $8,000 and eventually won the bid at $11,000. Eighteen-year-old Drey Marceaux of Kaplan, La., showed his 279 pound Yorkshire Hog and plans to attend LSU and major in agriculture. The Grant and Morris families also bought the 2010 Grand Champion Hog and said, “We are proud to do it and we are planting the seed for future generations.”

Next up were the lambs and 12-year-old Tyler Cox of Hobbs, N.M., presented his Reserve Grand Champion market Lamb. This was Tyler’s first time at the NWSS and he made a good first impression. Colorado Business Bank started the bidding at $6,000 and Traurig-Greenberg made the winning bid of $10,000.

The Grand Champion Lamb was shown by 17-year-old Justin Willoughby from Sheridan, Iowa. The winning bid of $15,000 was made by Jeff Keller of APC Construction.

Next came the steers. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer was 1,317 pound ‘Ram Jam’ shown by Kaiti Robinson of Conroe, Texas. Kaiti is 17-years-old and plans to attend Texas AM and major in Animal Communication. George Eidsness of Transwest Trucks made the winning bid of $33,000 and said, “When you look at this young group of kids that come in here and what they represent – and the hard work that they do – we are just honored to be able to come out and support the program and support the Scholarship Fund and everything that it stands for.”

The Grand Champion Steer was raised by Brock May of Mineral Point, Wis. No stranger to the Junior Livestock Auction, 17-year-old May was also the Reserve Grand Champion in 2007. Emil-Lenes Sirloin House opened the bidding at $20,000. The bidding was intense on the 1,315 pound steer before the winning bid of $50,000 was made by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

The Junior Livestock Auction is a major source of funding for the NWSS Scholarship Fund. “About $300,000 will go to students that will be majoring in Agriculture, Rural Medicine and Veterinary Sciences.” said Andrea Miller, the Scholarship Coordinator for the National Western, “The scholarship money is very important as it helps them succeed and not have to worry about other things while they are in school.”

Kathy Sabine of 9News summed up the event by saying, “Over the years we have had some life changing moments here. It’s a great night. It is great for the kids that we are furthering their education in agriculture. It’s a great event to be part of and I’m thrilled to be here.”