The kids rodeo at the Greeley Stampede is fun for the whole family | TheFencePost.com

The kids rodeo at the Greeley Stampede is fun for the whole family

Tony Bruguiere Ft. Collins, Colo.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

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It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.

The Greeley Stampede is now in its 89th year and bills itself as the “World’s Largest Rodeo and Fourth of July Celebration.” The Stampede is rich in tradition and heritage and its origin dates back to the late 1800s. When the festival had been around for 20 years or so, the residents of Greeley thought it was time to give it a name and the Greeley Spud Rodeo became its official name in 1922. The event featured bucking bronc riding, fancy roping, a pie eating contest, a horse race, motorcycle and bicycle races and a two-mile Model-T Ford “free for all” race.

In 1972 it became the Greeley Independence Stampede with a format pretty much the same as in 2011 – Pro Rodeos, kids rodeo, country and classic rock concerts, televised July 4 parade, a demolition derby, carnival midway, western art show, free stage entertainment, mixed with food and fun galore.

The Kids Rodeo has been around since at least 1972. Right there it is unique, as that is a long time for a community event and one that is not a pro rodeo or concert. Almost all Pro rodeos in the area have some token event for the kids. Most have a quick Mutton Busting at “half time.” Cheyenne Frontier Days has kids barrel racing, but it is early in the morning and seen mostly by parents. The Earl Anderson Memorial Rodeo in Grover, Colo., has Calf Riding as its first event each day and awards a championship buckle to the high point ride.

The Greeley Stampede has a Kid’s Rodeo that has events for kids three thru 19 there are events for the little kids, horse events, mutton busting, and bull riding. Ron Wildeman, Stampede General Chairman, says, “We are kind of unique in that not many cities and organizations put on a kid’s rode of this size. Many of the kids that enter come from southern Wyoming and South West Nebraska. There are even kids from new Mexico and Kansas.”

“These kids are traveling a long distance to take part in a kids rodeo.” said Wildeman, “It’s because we are one of the few events of this size that hosts something like this for kids. We run about 175 kids through as many as four different events. They can enter multiple events – and that’s something that no one else does either.”

It takes a lot of volunteers to put something like this together, but the Greeley Stampede Wranglers know it is work for a good cause. It is good for the kids too. Miss Rodeo Colorado, Kellsie Purdy of Estes Park, was one of the working volunteers and she said, “The reason that I got involved in Rodeo Queening was to promote western Heritage to younger kids. It is important to have kids interested in something that is good for them. Rodeo and getting involved in the western lifestyle is very good for them. It is so much fun for me to give back to the kids. You can see how excited they are to be here.”

It is really a treat for the kids to compete at the Greeley Stampede. It is fun for the younger kids, but the older ones understand just how special it is to be competing on the arena floor at the Greeley Stampede. The folks at the Stampede go all out to make it an organized and fun event. “It’s a huge amount of work to put this on.” said Ron Wildeman, “Three different areas of the arena are in use at the same time. Essentially, we’re running three arenas at the same time. We have the straight track set up. We have the Barrel Racing area set up, and then we have the rough stock area. At any one point in time, there is always something going on. It’s a huge undertaking from a manpower standpoint, but everyone works very hard – it’s a well oiled machine.”

And, if that was not enough ‘rodeoing’ for the kids, this year the Stampede offered mutton busting every day in the Park. The number of entries into the Recreational Mutton Bustin’ are huge and growing every year. The popular event is free and open to anyone three to seven years old and under 55 pounds. Besides taking some stress off of the Kid’s Rodeo, being offered every day would give more kids the opportunity to ‘ride like the big boys’.

The new event has been a hit with the kids and fair patrons. Ron Wildeman said, “The Mutton Bustin’ in the Park has been a wonderful success. Not only do the kids want to participate, but the people that are associated with the kids and those that have no knowledge whatsoever are having fun. Anytime that event is going on, there are lots of people over there enjoying it.”

The Kids Rodeo at the Greeley Independence Stampede is a really unique event, and the Stampede volunteer Wranglers go out of their way to make sure it is fun for the kids. Next year gather up the kids and come out to the Stampede and join in the fun.