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The Lindsay Ranch

Irma Wyhs
Edgewater, Colo.
The ranch house off Leyden Road sat in the valley, comfortably protected by the hogback.

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A lonely old corral, its boards buckled and gray, stood stoically against time and weather for years in a field just north of Leyden Road and just east of the hogback but it, too, is gone now, only the remnants of an old sagging fence a reminder of what was once the 3,000-acre George W. Lindsay Quarter-Circle-7 Ranch.

Once 180 head of Hereford cattle grazed in lush grass and wildflower meadows now leased by the Jefferson County Landfill on land bought in 1989 by the country’s second largest solid waste company, Browning and Ferris Industries.

On the south side of Leyden Road some of the huge spread is in Arvada’s Open Space with a small portion still privately owned.

Farther north there was a falling-down, weather-beaten relic of a barn that had been used for the cows during calving time. Tended by ranch hand Ted Kasberry, the barn and its surrounding thousand acres was bought by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1951 to build the Rocky Flats Nuclear Plant.

Once all of this mighty acreage belonged to George and Susan Lindsay starting with the 960-acre Leyden property purchased in 1923 for back taxes, according to Jefferson County records. Lindsay had discovered the land when searching for fire clay deposits.

Born in Denver on March 11, 1888, son of Robert Douglas Lindsay, Denver fire clay tycoon, George attended Denver schools and soon became as prominent in the fire clay business as his father.

A lonely old corral, its boards buckled and gray, stood stoically against time and weather for years in a field just north of Leyden Road and just east of the hogback but it, too, is gone now, only the remnants of an old sagging fence a reminder of what was once the 3,000-acre George W. Lindsay Quarter-Circle-7 Ranch.

Once 180 head of Hereford cattle grazed in lush grass and wildflower meadows now leased by the Jefferson County Landfill on land bought in 1989 by the country’s second largest solid waste company, Browning and Ferris Industries.

On the south side of Leyden Road some of the huge spread is in Arvada’s Open Space with a small portion still privately owned.

Farther north there was a falling-down, weather-beaten relic of a barn that had been used for the cows during calving time. Tended by ranch hand Ted Kasberry, the barn and its surrounding thousand acres was bought by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1951 to build the Rocky Flats Nuclear Plant.

Once all of this mighty acreage belonged to George and Susan Lindsay starting with the 960-acre Leyden property purchased in 1923 for back taxes, according to Jefferson County records. Lindsay had discovered the land when searching for fire clay deposits.

Born in Denver on March 11, 1888, son of Robert Douglas Lindsay, Denver fire clay tycoon, George attended Denver schools and soon became as prominent in the fire clay business as his father.

A lonely old corral, its boards buckled and gray, stood stoically against time and weather for years in a field just north of Leyden Road and just east of the hogback but it, too, is gone now, only the remnants of an old sagging fence a reminder of what was once the 3,000-acre George W. Lindsay Quarter-Circle-7 Ranch.

Once 180 head of Hereford cattle grazed in lush grass and wildflower meadows now leased by the Jefferson County Landfill on land bought in 1989 by the country’s second largest solid waste company, Browning and Ferris Industries.

On the south side of Leyden Road some of the huge spread is in Arvada’s Open Space with a small portion still privately owned.

Farther north there was a falling-down, weather-beaten relic of a barn that had been used for the cows during calving time. Tended by ranch hand Ted Kasberry, the barn and its surrounding thousand acres was bought by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1951 to build the Rocky Flats Nuclear Plant.

Once all of this mighty acreage belonged to George and Susan Lindsay starting with the 960-acre Leyden property purchased in 1923 for back taxes, according to Jefferson County records. Lindsay had discovered the land when searching for fire clay deposits.

Born in Denver on March 11, 1888, son of Robert Douglas Lindsay, Denver fire clay tycoon, George attended Denver schools and soon became as prominent in the fire clay business as his father.

A lonely old corral, its boards buckled and gray, stood stoically against time and weather for years in a field just north of Leyden Road and just east of the hogback but it, too, is gone now, only the remnants of an old sagging fence a reminder of what was once the 3,000-acre George W. Lindsay Quarter-Circle-7 Ranch.

Once 180 head of Hereford cattle grazed in lush grass and wildflower meadows now leased by the Jefferson County Landfill on land bought in 1989 by the country’s second largest solid waste company, Browning and Ferris Industries.

On the south side of Leyden Road some of the huge spread is in Arvada’s Open Space with a small portion still privately owned.

Farther north there was a falling-down, weather-beaten relic of a barn that had been used for the cows during calving time. Tended by ranch hand Ted Kasberry, the barn and its surrounding thousand acres was bought by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1951 to build the Rocky Flats Nuclear Plant.

Once all of this mighty acreage belonged to George and Susan Lindsay starting with the 960-acre Leyden property purchased in 1923 for back taxes, according to Jefferson County records. Lindsay had discovered the land when searching for fire clay deposits.

Born in Denver on March 11, 1888, son of Robert Douglas Lindsay, Denver fire clay tycoon, George attended Denver schools and soon became as prominent in the fire clay business as his father.




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