The sweet smell of technology | TheFencePost.com

The sweet smell of technology

By Christy Fredrickson

Morrill, Neb.

Awhile back, I ran across a very interesting article about some new technology that has real potential in the real world. A guy named Gang Sun, a chemist at the University of California-Davis, has invented a new fabric that refuses to stink.

That’s right, this new fabric, which is made with chlorine molecules, was made into socks and tested by the UC-Davis cross-country running team. The runners used their socks daily for their miles-long workouts, and when they were done, they would sniff their socks.

Incredibly, these brave sniffers didn’t pass out! They didn’t even have to gasp for air! In fact, the socks stayed sweet even after five days of twelve-mile runs! And since the chlorine molecules in the fabric also kill germs, the socks are healthy socks, too!

Mr. Sun, the inventor, is looking at developing his fabric for uses in hospitals for things like lab coats, curtains and sheets, to cut down on infection rates.

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Now this is a truly great invention, if you ask me. Anyone who has ever done laundry will agree that there has GOT to be a better way to see if clothing is dirty than to smell the armpits.

Of course, you can tell your family to put their dirty clothes in the dirty clothes hamper, instead of on the floor, but this old practice is like Communism … it only works in theory. Telling them to put the dirties in the dirty clothes hamper is like telling them not to put empty boxes back in the pantry. You can rant and rave and scream and lecture all you want, and they will look you right in the eye and say, “Okay! Okay! Don’t have a cow!” But then they will go right back to their evil ways.

But anyway, back to my subject, if they could invent socks that don’t stink, just think of the possibilities in the rest of life! They could invent trash cans that don’t stink, diapers that don’t stink, and even home permanents that are “nose friendly.”

It could be even bigger, too. Feedlots would be friendlier, maybe the schools would even take kids there on field trips. Cleaning out the chicken house would be a happy chore. Even hog farms would be welcomed into communities with open arms.

Oh yes, the possibilities are endless. This is one technology that I would like to keep my eye on. There is only one problem with it that I can think of, though. If they were to make the whole world “odor-free”, how would you know when it was time to clean out the refrigerator?