The world’s child, Delaney Wadsworth | TheFencePost.com

The world’s child, Delaney Wadsworth

T.M. Fasano
Windsor, Colo.

Delaney Wadsworth is called “the world’s child” by her family.

Delaney, 3, is all about giving hugs, putting smiles on the faces of those who know her and don’t know her and acting as if she doesn’t know a stranger.

“She’s always loved people. She loves to be around them. She loves to talk to them. She loves making people laugh,” said Delaney’s mother, Brenna Wadsworth. “She just absolutely adores everybody.”

Recently, Delaney got up in front of the congregation at Bethel Lutheran Church in Windsor, Colo., and sang, “Jesus Loves Me.”

A recent trip to the pediatrician, though, turned Delaney’s perfect little world into one of uncertainty.

Delaney, who is from Rawlins, Wyo., was visiting her grandparents outside of Windsor when she saw a pediatrician in Eaton, Colo., on July 2 for what her parents thought was an ear infection.

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Before they knew it, Jason Wadsworth, 31, and Brenna, 26, were sitting with their daughter in the emergency room at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colo., getting a CT scan. Doctors saw something on the scan and said she had a brain tumor. Jason and Brenna were told they needed to take Delaney to The Children’s Hospital that night in Aurora, Colo.

“We were freaking going crazy. We just pretty much broke down. We couldn’t believe it. It was just overwhelming,” said Jason, a 1998 Windsor High School graduate who has taken a year’s leave of absence from Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins, Wyo., where he works as a correctional sergeant, to be with Delaney. “This isn’t something we ever thought of in our wildest nightmare to happen to our own little girl. It’s our only kid.”

Delaney was diagnosed with a brain tumor called diffuse pontine glioma.

“It’s tragic. This is a horrible feeling to feel as a dad, especially when it’s your little baby girl that’s 3 years old. It’s not the rarest tumor, but it’s the deadliest,” Jason said. “This tumor is 100 percent fatal. They’ve never found a cure, and they said there’s no case where anybody’s lived over 18 months with it. They said it’s most common in 2 to 8 year olds.”

Brenna admits that she’s still in a little bit of denial over what’s transpired since the beginning of the month.

“It’s my only child and it’s hard to think that that could happen. It doesn’t make any sense to me,” Brenna said. “I understand that she has a brain tumor, but it’s just hard to believe that she’s going to die. It hurts more than anything I ever thought possible.”

Delaney, Jason and Brenna live in Rawlins, Wyo., but are now living with Jason’s parents – Charley and Terry Wadsworth – outside of Windsor, Colo., for more family support and so they can be closer to doctors in Denver, Colo.

Charley Wadsworth said she’s asking for people to pray for her granddaughter.

“Above all, we want prayers. We want prayers for a miracle,” Charley said. “I know there’s power in prayer. That’s going to save her. We’ve just got to save her. Our hearts have been ripped out. We are not giving up. The Wadsworths have always been a fighting family. Nothing means anything without our little girl.”

Jason said Delaney, who has long blonde hair and blue eyes, was the type of girl who had never been sick before and is one of the most wonderful and caring kids a person could ever meet.

“She’ll give you a hug. She doesn’t know a stranger. She’s nice and friendly to everybody,” Jason said.

Brenna said Delaney, a winner in the Little Miss Wyoming pageant circuit, has always been a mama’s girl.

“From the time she was 2 weeks old, she cried for mama the first time,” Brenna said. “Since then, she’s been a mama’s girl. We do everything together.”

Jason said Delaney went through five, 20-minute sessions of radiation that ended Friday, July 23, at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Colo. He also said Delaney is taking steroids to reduce the swelling of the tumor. Her balance has been a little off, said her parents.

“She’s like a normal kid. If you came out here and saw her, you’d never know she had a brain tumor,” Jason said. “We pretty much let her know that she’s got an owie on her head and we’ve got to keep going to the doctor. That’s pretty much all we’ve told her. It’s tough to talk about it to her.”

Jason said the family opted out of chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemo is nine months of treatment, and that’s what they gave us for her life span,” Jason said. “They have no evidence or proof that it prolongs anything. She will get an MRI after one month of completion of radiation, and every three months after that. They said about the seven-month mark from the time the radiation is complete is when they’ll see the tumor come back, and I guess when it comes back it just rapidly grows.”

Jason and Brenna are staying strong around Delaney.

“It gets difficult when she’s sleeping. That’s usually the time we have a lot of difficulty,” he said. “In front of her we’re just strong. We’re trying to act like everyday parents. We try not to mope around about it and grieve about it. From the time she wakes up to the time she goes to bed, we’ve been playing with her and taking advantage of every moment we’ve got.”

Delaney Wadsworth is called “the world’s child” by her family.

Delaney, 3, is all about giving hugs, putting smiles on the faces of those who know her and don’t know her and acting as if she doesn’t know a stranger.

“She’s always loved people. She loves to be around them. She loves to talk to them. She loves making people laugh,” said Delaney’s mother, Brenna Wadsworth. “She just absolutely adores everybody.”

Recently, Delaney got up in front of the congregation at Bethel Lutheran Church in Windsor, Colo., and sang, “Jesus Loves Me.”

A recent trip to the pediatrician, though, turned Delaney’s perfect little world into one of uncertainty.

Delaney, who is from Rawlins, Wyo., was visiting her grandparents outside of Windsor when she saw a pediatrician in Eaton, Colo., on July 2 for what her parents thought was an ear infection.

Before they knew it, Jason Wadsworth, 31, and Brenna, 26, were sitting with their daughter in the emergency room at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colo., getting a CT scan. Doctors saw something on the scan and said she had a brain tumor. Jason and Brenna were told they needed to take Delaney to The Children’s Hospital that night in Aurora, Colo.

“We were freaking going crazy. We just pretty much broke down. We couldn’t believe it. It was just overwhelming,” said Jason, a 1998 Windsor High School graduate who has taken a year’s leave of absence from Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins, Wyo., where he works as a correctional sergeant, to be with Delaney. “This isn’t something we ever thought of in our wildest nightmare to happen to our own little girl. It’s our only kid.”

Delaney was diagnosed with a brain tumor called diffuse pontine glioma.

“It’s tragic. This is a horrible feeling to feel as a dad, especially when it’s your little baby girl that’s 3 years old. It’s not the rarest tumor, but it’s the deadliest,” Jason said. “This tumor is 100 percent fatal. They’ve never found a cure, and they said there’s no case where anybody’s lived over 18 months with it. They said it’s most common in 2 to 8 year olds.”

Brenna admits that she’s still in a little bit of denial over what’s transpired since the beginning of the month.

“It’s my only child and it’s hard to think that that could happen. It doesn’t make any sense to me,” Brenna said. “I understand that she has a brain tumor, but it’s just hard to believe that she’s going to die. It hurts more than anything I ever thought possible.”

Delaney, Jason and Brenna live in Rawlins, Wyo., but are now living with Jason’s parents – Charley and Terry Wadsworth – outside of Windsor, Colo., for more family support and so they can be closer to doctors in Denver, Colo.

Charley Wadsworth said she’s asking for people to pray for her granddaughter.

“Above all, we want prayers. We want prayers for a miracle,” Charley said. “I know there’s power in prayer. That’s going to save her. We’ve just got to save her. Our hearts have been ripped out. We are not giving up. The Wadsworths have always been a fighting family. Nothing means anything without our little girl.”

Jason said Delaney, who has long blonde hair and blue eyes, was the type of girl who had never been sick before and is one of the most wonderful and caring kids a person could ever meet.

“She’ll give you a hug. She doesn’t know a stranger. She’s nice and friendly to everybody,” Jason said.

Brenna said Delaney, a winner in the Little Miss Wyoming pageant circuit, has always been a mama’s girl.

“From the time she was 2 weeks old, she cried for mama the first time,” Brenna said. “Since then, she’s been a mama’s girl. We do everything together.”

Jason said Delaney went through five, 20-minute sessions of radiation that ended Friday, July 23, at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Colo. He also said Delaney is taking steroids to reduce the swelling of the tumor. Her balance has been a little off, said her parents.

“She’s like a normal kid. If you came out here and saw her, you’d never know she had a brain tumor,” Jason said. “We pretty much let her know that she’s got an owie on her head and we’ve got to keep going to the doctor. That’s pretty much all we’ve told her. It’s tough to talk about it to her.”

Jason said the family opted out of chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemo is nine months of treatment, and that’s what they gave us for her life span,” Jason said. “They have no evidence or proof that it prolongs anything. She will get an MRI after one month of completion of radiation, and every three months after that. They said about the seven-month mark from the time the radiation is complete is when they’ll see the tumor come back, and I guess when it comes back it just rapidly grows.”

Jason and Brenna are staying strong around Delaney.

“It gets difficult when she’s sleeping. That’s usually the time we have a lot of difficulty,” he said. “In front of her we’re just strong. We’re trying to act like everyday parents. We try not to mope around about it and grieve about it. From the time she wakes up to the time she goes to bed, we’ve been playing with her and taking advantage of every moment we’ve got.”

Delaney Wadsworth is called “the world’s child” by her family.

Delaney, 3, is all about giving hugs, putting smiles on the faces of those who know her and don’t know her and acting as if she doesn’t know a stranger.

“She’s always loved people. She loves to be around them. She loves to talk to them. She loves making people laugh,” said Delaney’s mother, Brenna Wadsworth. “She just absolutely adores everybody.”

Recently, Delaney got up in front of the congregation at Bethel Lutheran Church in Windsor, Colo., and sang, “Jesus Loves Me.”

A recent trip to the pediatrician, though, turned Delaney’s perfect little world into one of uncertainty.

Delaney, who is from Rawlins, Wyo., was visiting her grandparents outside of Windsor when she saw a pediatrician in Eaton, Colo., on July 2 for what her parents thought was an ear infection.

Before they knew it, Jason Wadsworth, 31, and Brenna, 26, were sitting with their daughter in the emergency room at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colo., getting a CT scan. Doctors saw something on the scan and said she had a brain tumor. Jason and Brenna were told they needed to take Delaney to The Children’s Hospital that night in Aurora, Colo.

“We were freaking going crazy. We just pretty much broke down. We couldn’t believe it. It was just overwhelming,” said Jason, a 1998 Windsor High School graduate who has taken a year’s leave of absence from Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins, Wyo., where he works as a correctional sergeant, to be with Delaney. “This isn’t something we ever thought of in our wildest nightmare to happen to our own little girl. It’s our only kid.”

Delaney was diagnosed with a brain tumor called diffuse pontine glioma.

“It’s tragic. This is a horrible feeling to feel as a dad, especially when it’s your little baby girl that’s 3 years old. It’s not the rarest tumor, but it’s the deadliest,” Jason said. “This tumor is 100 percent fatal. They’ve never found a cure, and they said there’s no case where anybody’s lived over 18 months with it. They said it’s most common in 2 to 8 year olds.”

Brenna admits that she’s still in a little bit of denial over what’s transpired since the beginning of the month.

“It’s my only child and it’s hard to think that that could happen. It doesn’t make any sense to me,” Brenna said. “I understand that she has a brain tumor, but it’s just hard to believe that she’s going to die. It hurts more than anything I ever thought possible.”

Delaney, Jason and Brenna live in Rawlins, Wyo., but are now living with Jason’s parents – Charley and Terry Wadsworth – outside of Windsor, Colo., for more family support and so they can be closer to doctors in Denver, Colo.

Charley Wadsworth said she’s asking for people to pray for her granddaughter.

“Above all, we want prayers. We want prayers for a miracle,” Charley said. “I know there’s power in prayer. That’s going to save her. We’ve just got to save her. Our hearts have been ripped out. We are not giving up. The Wadsworths have always been a fighting family. Nothing means anything without our little girl.”

Jason said Delaney, who has long blonde hair and blue eyes, was the type of girl who had never been sick before and is one of the most wonderful and caring kids a person could ever meet.

“She’ll give you a hug. She doesn’t know a stranger. She’s nice and friendly to everybody,” Jason said.

Brenna said Delaney, a winner in the Little Miss Wyoming pageant circuit, has always been a mama’s girl.

“From the time she was 2 weeks old, she cried for mama the first time,” Brenna said. “Since then, she’s been a mama’s girl. We do everything together.”

Jason said Delaney went through five, 20-minute sessions of radiation that ended Friday, July 23, at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Colo. He also said Delaney is taking steroids to reduce the swelling of the tumor. Her balance has been a little off, said her parents.

“She’s like a normal kid. If you came out here and saw her, you’d never know she had a brain tumor,” Jason said. “We pretty much let her know that she’s got an owie on her head and we’ve got to keep going to the doctor. That’s pretty much all we’ve told her. It’s tough to talk about it to her.”

Jason said the family opted out of chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemo is nine months of treatment, and that’s what they gave us for her life span,” Jason said. “They have no evidence or proof that it prolongs anything. She will get an MRI after one month of completion of radiation, and every three months after that. They said about the seven-month mark from the time the radiation is complete is when they’ll see the tumor come back, and I guess when it comes back it just rapidly grows.”

Jason and Brenna are staying strong around Delaney.

“It gets difficult when she’s sleeping. That’s usually the time we have a lot of difficulty,” he said. “In front of her we’re just strong. We’re trying to act like everyday parents. We try not to mope around about it and grieve about it. From the time she wakes up to the time she goes to bed, we’ve been playing with her and taking advantage of every moment we’ve got.”

Delaney Wadsworth is called “the world’s child” by her family.

Delaney, 3, is all about giving hugs, putting smiles on the faces of those who know her and don’t know her and acting as if she doesn’t know a stranger.

“She’s always loved people. She loves to be around them. She loves to talk to them. She loves making people laugh,” said Delaney’s mother, Brenna Wadsworth. “She just absolutely adores everybody.”

Recently, Delaney got up in front of the congregation at Bethel Lutheran Church in Windsor, Colo., and sang, “Jesus Loves Me.”

A recent trip to the pediatrician, though, turned Delaney’s perfect little world into one of uncertainty.

Delaney, who is from Rawlins, Wyo., was visiting her grandparents outside of Windsor when she saw a pediatrician in Eaton, Colo., on July 2 for what her parents thought was an ear infection.

Before they knew it, Jason Wadsworth, 31, and Brenna, 26, were sitting with their daughter in the emergency room at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colo., getting a CT scan. Doctors saw something on the scan and said she had a brain tumor. Jason and Brenna were told they needed to take Delaney to The Children’s Hospital that night in Aurora, Colo.

“We were freaking going crazy. We just pretty much broke down. We couldn’t believe it. It was just overwhelming,” said Jason, a 1998 Windsor High School graduate who has taken a year’s leave of absence from Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins, Wyo., where he works as a correctional sergeant, to be with Delaney. “This isn’t something we ever thought of in our wildest nightmare to happen to our own little girl. It’s our only kid.”

Delaney was diagnosed with a brain tumor called diffuse pontine glioma.

“It’s tragic. This is a horrible feeling to feel as a dad, especially when it’s your little baby girl that’s 3 years old. It’s not the rarest tumor, but it’s the deadliest,” Jason said. “This tumor is 100 percent fatal. They’ve never found a cure, and they said there’s no case where anybody’s lived over 18 months with it. They said it’s most common in 2 to 8 year olds.”

Brenna admits that she’s still in a little bit of denial over what’s transpired since the beginning of the month.

“It’s my only child and it’s hard to think that that could happen. It doesn’t make any sense to me,” Brenna said. “I understand that she has a brain tumor, but it’s just hard to believe that she’s going to die. It hurts more than anything I ever thought possible.”

Delaney, Jason and Brenna live in Rawlins, Wyo., but are now living with Jason’s parents – Charley and Terry Wadsworth – outside of Windsor, Colo., for more family support and so they can be closer to doctors in Denver, Colo.

Charley Wadsworth said she’s asking for people to pray for her granddaughter.

“Above all, we want prayers. We want prayers for a miracle,” Charley said. “I know there’s power in prayer. That’s going to save her. We’ve just got to save her. Our hearts have been ripped out. We are not giving up. The Wadsworths have always been a fighting family. Nothing means anything without our little girl.”

Jason said Delaney, who has long blonde hair and blue eyes, was the type of girl who had never been sick before and is one of the most wonderful and caring kids a person could ever meet.

“She’ll give you a hug. She doesn’t know a stranger. She’s nice and friendly to everybody,” Jason said.

Brenna said Delaney, a winner in the Little Miss Wyoming pageant circuit, has always been a mama’s girl.

“From the time she was 2 weeks old, she cried for mama the first time,” Brenna said. “Since then, she’s been a mama’s girl. We do everything together.”

Jason said Delaney went through five, 20-minute sessions of radiation that ended Friday, July 23, at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora, Colo. He also said Delaney is taking steroids to reduce the swelling of the tumor. Her balance has been a little off, said her parents.

“She’s like a normal kid. If you came out here and saw her, you’d never know she had a brain tumor,” Jason said. “We pretty much let her know that she’s got an owie on her head and we’ve got to keep going to the doctor. That’s pretty much all we’ve told her. It’s tough to talk about it to her.”

Jason said the family opted out of chemotherapy treatments.

“Chemo is nine months of treatment, and that’s what they gave us for her life span,” Jason said. “They have no evidence or proof that it prolongs anything. She will get an MRI after one month of completion of radiation, and every three months after that. They said about the seven-month mark from the time the radiation is complete is when they’ll see the tumor come back, and I guess when it comes back it just rapidly grows.”

Jason and Brenna are staying strong around Delaney.

“It gets difficult when she’s sleeping. That’s usually the time we have a lot of difficulty,” he said. “In front of her we’re just strong. We’re trying to act like everyday parents. We try not to mope around about it and grieve about it. From the time she wakes up to the time she goes to bed, we’ve been playing with her and taking advantage of every moment we’ve got.”