Timnath resident inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame | TheFencePost.com

Timnath resident inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Staff Reporter

Raleigh Brooks was recently inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame. The award was given to Brooks for his contributions to 4-H and his achievements during his life. The award was given to Brooks by the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents.

Brooks was one of 15 inductees who were inducted at the National 4-H Youth Conference held in Chevy Chase, Md., on October 7. At the presentation, he said, “I am pleased to have had the opportunity to have been a 4-H member myself. It helped me to grow to a point where I could apply the skills and knowledge I have learned and to benefit and serve others during my career in county, state and national program roles.”

“The National Association of Extension 4-H Agents (NAE4-HA) is proud to acknowledge the outstanding 2011 National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees for the passion, dedication, vision and leadership they’ve shown toward our young people during their many years of service to 4-H,” said Lori Purcell-Bledsoe, president of NAE4-HA.

National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees are nominated by their home states, National 4-H Council, National Association of Extension 4-H Agents, or 4-H Headquarters based upon their exceptional leadership at the local, state, national and international levels. Brooks was nominated by the Colorado 4-H.

Brooks has a long history in agriculture. A resident of Timnath, Colo., Brooks graduated from Colorado State University in 1951 with a Bachelor of Science in animal husbandry.

Brooks came back to CSU for information on artificial insemination, to use on his ranch. At the time, he managed 500 head of Black Angus on 18,000 acres of ranch and irrigated farm ground. He raised his own feed and operated his own feedlot. He showed the cattle that he had at the National Western Stock Show in Denver.

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In 1956, he became the Agricultural and 4-H Agent in Pueblo County. He held the position until 1961, when he then transitioned to the role of Assistant State 4-H Leader at CSU.

He then earned his Master of Science in Education in 1968. His thesis was titled “Learning Climate for 4-H.” Brooks was appointed the State 4-H Leader in 1980, and continued to serve in that role until 1988, when he retired.

“I think that one of the things that distinguishes Raleigh is that he started in extension in the 50s. One of the things we continually get comments about, is when something new happens in 4-H, people don’t always like it. There are a lot of things that people will say. The truth is that things have never stayed the same in 4-H. People have limited perspectives based on what they have to do. They think that is all that 4-H and extension represent. Throughout his career, Raleigh helped lead change with extension and 4-H. He was very innovative in what he was doing. He was leading the pack,” said Dale Leidheiser, Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development with Colorado State University.

Through the years, Brooks has given support to 4-H and has helped to create many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth. “Raleigh Brooks has been actively involved with youth and agriculture in Colorado since his Colorado State University days. Through the years, he has not only given constant support to traditional 4-H programs and participants but he also helped create, then support many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth such as the Dare to Be You program, which developed self-esteem through youth and peer-training, as well as their teachers and parents. Whether in these programs or the traditional farm/ranch, science, or home economics program areas, his goal was to build youth instead of jails,” said Leidheiser.

He continued, “He helped have a role in some of the first international programs that 4-H was involved with. Program leaders from around the country take on roles nationally and he had been the contact for leading all of our programs international programs, such as the International 4-H Youth Exchange.”

Brooks just wanted to make a difference. “What we’ve tried to do with 4-H since its inception is to take the information out of the land-grant system and to provide an opportunity for youth to explore in real life what that means, whether it’s a livestock program or an aerospace program. Our curriculum delivers the latest technology coming out of the university and matches that with the needs of our population, both youth and their parents. We’re more and more on the cutting edge with youth that are most vulnerable,” said Brooks.

According to his biography with the Hall of Fame, “Brooks’ many state duties included coordinating international 4-H programs and extension international exchanges, initiating the Community Pride program with support from Chevron Oil, coordinating the National Western Stock Show program for 4-H and building the Catch-A-Calf program, coordinating the 4-H Roundup program which he helped expand to over 25 states, coordinating 4-H state fair activities, coordinating national awards for National 4-H Congress, Citizenship-Washington Focus and National 4-H Conference and guiding the Colorado 4-H Youth Fund.”

Brooks has many other achievements related to agriculture. He was named a “Pacemaker” by CSU in 1951 for his contributions to Colorado A&M. The award was given to 27 animal husbandry or animal science students between 1935 and 1965. Other awards related to 4-H include Pueblo newspaper, “Page One Award” and Champion Agent Livestock Judge in 1958, F.A. Anderson Award as outstanding CSU campus-based Extension professional in 1978, Honorary Trustee with the Colorado 4-H Foundation in 1992, and Colorado 4-H Foundation Honors Recognition in 2000. The Stow Witwer Memorial Award for Outstanding Support of and Efforts Toward Promoting Junior Activities in the Legacy of Stow Witwer was presented to Brooks in 1996 at the National Western Stock Show.

The Colorado 4-H has an award named after Brooks, called the Raleigh Brooks Outstanding 4-H Adult Leader Award. To be eligible, a 4-H adult must be involved with 4-H youth, either as a club leader or county council leader representative for at least five years. The award was established in May of 2011.

Even though Brooks is no longer involved with 4-H, he is still active in the Timnath community. “Raleigh has been an active participant in his community in addition to his professional youth development responsibilities. He developed a large community garden on his own property which enables neighbors to grow fresh vegetables. He has also planted huge crops of sweet corn and pumpkins which he has sold at a roadside stand and donated to various charitable organizations. Each fall he would raise money for the CSU Collegiate 4-H club by filling his pickup with pumpkins, park it on campus, put a sign in the window asking for donations and crack the windows for people to slip in dollar bills,” said Leidheiser.

Brooks and his wife Edith are also active members at the Timnath Presbyterian Church and sing in the choir.

The National 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2002 as part of the Centennial Project of the NAE4-HA, and partners with National 4-H Council and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA. For more information about the National 4-H Hall of Fame event and past recipients, please visit http://www.NAE4ha.com/HOF.

Raleigh Brooks was recently inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame. The award was given to Brooks for his contributions to 4-H and his achievements during his life. The award was given to Brooks by the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents.

Brooks was one of 15 inductees who were inducted at the National 4-H Youth Conference held in Chevy Chase, Md., on October 7. At the presentation, he said, “I am pleased to have had the opportunity to have been a 4-H member myself. It helped me to grow to a point where I could apply the skills and knowledge I have learned and to benefit and serve others during my career in county, state and national program roles.”

“The National Association of Extension 4-H Agents (NAE4-HA) is proud to acknowledge the outstanding 2011 National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees for the passion, dedication, vision and leadership they’ve shown toward our young people during their many years of service to 4-H,” said Lori Purcell-Bledsoe, president of NAE4-HA.

National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees are nominated by their home states, National 4-H Council, National Association of Extension 4-H Agents, or 4-H Headquarters based upon their exceptional leadership at the local, state, national and international levels. Brooks was nominated by the Colorado 4-H.

Brooks has a long history in agriculture. A resident of Timnath, Colo., Brooks graduated from Colorado State University in 1951 with a Bachelor of Science in animal husbandry.

Brooks came back to CSU for information on artificial insemination, to use on his ranch. At the time, he managed 500 head of Black Angus on 18,000 acres of ranch and irrigated farm ground. He raised his own feed and operated his own feedlot. He showed the cattle that he had at the National Western Stock Show in Denver.

In 1956, he became the Agricultural and 4-H Agent in Pueblo County. He held the position until 1961, when he then transitioned to the role of Assistant State 4-H Leader at CSU.

He then earned his Master of Science in Education in 1968. His thesis was titled “Learning Climate for 4-H.” Brooks was appointed the State 4-H Leader in 1980, and continued to serve in that role until 1988, when he retired.

“I think that one of the things that distinguishes Raleigh is that he started in extension in the 50s. One of the things we continually get comments about, is when something new happens in 4-H, people don’t always like it. There are a lot of things that people will say. The truth is that things have never stayed the same in 4-H. People have limited perspectives based on what they have to do. They think that is all that 4-H and extension represent. Throughout his career, Raleigh helped lead change with extension and 4-H. He was very innovative in what he was doing. He was leading the pack,” said Dale Leidheiser, Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development with Colorado State University.

Through the years, Brooks has given support to 4-H and has helped to create many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth. “Raleigh Brooks has been actively involved with youth and agriculture in Colorado since his Colorado State University days. Through the years, he has not only given constant support to traditional 4-H programs and participants but he also helped create, then support many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth such as the Dare to Be You program, which developed self-esteem through youth and peer-training, as well as their teachers and parents. Whether in these programs or the traditional farm/ranch, science, or home economics program areas, his goal was to build youth instead of jails,” said Leidheiser.

He continued, “He helped have a role in some of the first international programs that 4-H was involved with. Program leaders from around the country take on roles nationally and he had been the contact for leading all of our programs international programs, such as the International 4-H Youth Exchange.”

Brooks just wanted to make a difference. “What we’ve tried to do with 4-H since its inception is to take the information out of the land-grant system and to provide an opportunity for youth to explore in real life what that means, whether it’s a livestock program or an aerospace program. Our curriculum delivers the latest technology coming out of the university and matches that with the needs of our population, both youth and their parents. We’re more and more on the cutting edge with youth that are most vulnerable,” said Brooks.

According to his biography with the Hall of Fame, “Brooks’ many state duties included coordinating international 4-H programs and extension international exchanges, initiating the Community Pride program with support from Chevron Oil, coordinating the National Western Stock Show program for 4-H and building the Catch-A-Calf program, coordinating the 4-H Roundup program which he helped expand to over 25 states, coordinating 4-H state fair activities, coordinating national awards for National 4-H Congress, Citizenship-Washington Focus and National 4-H Conference and guiding the Colorado 4-H Youth Fund.”

Brooks has many other achievements related to agriculture. He was named a “Pacemaker” by CSU in 1951 for his contributions to Colorado A&M. The award was given to 27 animal husbandry or animal science students between 1935 and 1965. Other awards related to 4-H include Pueblo newspaper, “Page One Award” and Champion Agent Livestock Judge in 1958, F.A. Anderson Award as outstanding CSU campus-based Extension professional in 1978, Honorary Trustee with the Colorado 4-H Foundation in 1992, and Colorado 4-H Foundation Honors Recognition in 2000. The Stow Witwer Memorial Award for Outstanding Support of and Efforts Toward Promoting Junior Activities in the Legacy of Stow Witwer was presented to Brooks in 1996 at the National Western Stock Show.

The Colorado 4-H has an award named after Brooks, called the Raleigh Brooks Outstanding 4-H Adult Leader Award. To be eligible, a 4-H adult must be involved with 4-H youth, either as a club leader or county council leader representative for at least five years. The award was established in May of 2011.

Even though Brooks is no longer involved with 4-H, he is still active in the Timnath community. “Raleigh has been an active participant in his community in addition to his professional youth development responsibilities. He developed a large community garden on his own property which enables neighbors to grow fresh vegetables. He has also planted huge crops of sweet corn and pumpkins which he has sold at a roadside stand and donated to various charitable organizations. Each fall he would raise money for the CSU Collegiate 4-H club by filling his pickup with pumpkins, park it on campus, put a sign in the window asking for donations and crack the windows for people to slip in dollar bills,” said Leidheiser.

Brooks and his wife Edith are also active members at the Timnath Presbyterian Church and sing in the choir.

The National 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2002 as part of the Centennial Project of the NAE4-HA, and partners with National 4-H Council and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA. For more information about the National 4-H Hall of Fame event and past recipients, please visit http://www.NAE4ha.com/HOF.

Raleigh Brooks was recently inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame. The award was given to Brooks for his contributions to 4-H and his achievements during his life. The award was given to Brooks by the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents.

Brooks was one of 15 inductees who were inducted at the National 4-H Youth Conference held in Chevy Chase, Md., on October 7. At the presentation, he said, “I am pleased to have had the opportunity to have been a 4-H member myself. It helped me to grow to a point where I could apply the skills and knowledge I have learned and to benefit and serve others during my career in county, state and national program roles.”

“The National Association of Extension 4-H Agents (NAE4-HA) is proud to acknowledge the outstanding 2011 National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees for the passion, dedication, vision and leadership they’ve shown toward our young people during their many years of service to 4-H,” said Lori Purcell-Bledsoe, president of NAE4-HA.

National 4-H Hall of Fame honorees are nominated by their home states, National 4-H Council, National Association of Extension 4-H Agents, or 4-H Headquarters based upon their exceptional leadership at the local, state, national and international levels. Brooks was nominated by the Colorado 4-H.

Brooks has a long history in agriculture. A resident of Timnath, Colo., Brooks graduated from Colorado State University in 1951 with a Bachelor of Science in animal husbandry.

Brooks came back to CSU for information on artificial insemination, to use on his ranch. At the time, he managed 500 head of Black Angus on 18,000 acres of ranch and irrigated farm ground. He raised his own feed and operated his own feedlot. He showed the cattle that he had at the National Western Stock Show in Denver.

In 1956, he became the Agricultural and 4-H Agent in Pueblo County. He held the position until 1961, when he then transitioned to the role of Assistant State 4-H Leader at CSU.

He then earned his Master of Science in Education in 1968. His thesis was titled “Learning Climate for 4-H.” Brooks was appointed the State 4-H Leader in 1980, and continued to serve in that role until 1988, when he retired.

“I think that one of the things that distinguishes Raleigh is that he started in extension in the 50s. One of the things we continually get comments about, is when something new happens in 4-H, people don’t always like it. There are a lot of things that people will say. The truth is that things have never stayed the same in 4-H. People have limited perspectives based on what they have to do. They think that is all that 4-H and extension represent. Throughout his career, Raleigh helped lead change with extension and 4-H. He was very innovative in what he was doing. He was leading the pack,” said Dale Leidheiser, Extension Specialist, 4-H Youth Development with Colorado State University.

Through the years, Brooks has given support to 4-H and has helped to create many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth. “Raleigh Brooks has been actively involved with youth and agriculture in Colorado since his Colorado State University days. Through the years, he has not only given constant support to traditional 4-H programs and participants but he also helped create, then support many programs for non-traditional and at-risk youth such as the Dare to Be You program, which developed self-esteem through youth and peer-training, as well as their teachers and parents. Whether in these programs or the traditional farm/ranch, science, or home economics program areas, his goal was to build youth instead of jails,” said Leidheiser.

He continued, “He helped have a role in some of the first international programs that 4-H was involved with. Program leaders from around the country take on roles nationally and he had been the contact for leading all of our programs international programs, such as the International 4-H Youth Exchange.”

Brooks just wanted to make a difference. “What we’ve tried to do with 4-H since its inception is to take the information out of the land-grant system and to provide an opportunity for youth to explore in real life what that means, whether it’s a livestock program or an aerospace program. Our curriculum delivers the latest technology coming out of the university and matches that with the needs of our population, both youth and their parents. We’re more and more on the cutting edge with youth that are most vulnerable,” said Brooks.

According to his biography with the Hall of Fame, “Brooks’ many state duties included coordinating international 4-H programs and extension international exchanges, initiating the Community Pride program with support from Chevron Oil, coordinating the National Western Stock Show program for 4-H and building the Catch-A-Calf program, coordinating the 4-H Roundup program which he helped expand to over 25 states, coordinating 4-H state fair activities, coordinating national awards for National 4-H Congress, Citizenship-Washington Focus and National 4-H Conference and guiding the Colorado 4-H Youth Fund.”

Brooks has many other achievements related to agriculture. He was named a “Pacemaker” by CSU in 1951 for his contributions to Colorado A&M. The award was given to 27 animal husbandry or animal science students between 1935 and 1965. Other awards related to 4-H include Pueblo newspaper, “Page One Award” and Champion Agent Livestock Judge in 1958, F.A. Anderson Award as outstanding CSU campus-based Extension professional in 1978, Honorary Trustee with the Colorado 4-H Foundation in 1992, and Colorado 4-H Foundation Honors Recognition in 2000. The Stow Witwer Memorial Award for Outstanding Support of and Efforts Toward Promoting Junior Activities in the Legacy of Stow Witwer was presented to Brooks in 1996 at the National Western Stock Show.

The Colorado 4-H has an award named after Brooks, called the Raleigh Brooks Outstanding 4-H Adult Leader Award. To be eligible, a 4-H adult must be involved with 4-H youth, either as a club leader or county council leader representative for at least five years. The award was established in May of 2011.

Even though Brooks is no longer involved with 4-H, he is still active in the Timnath community. “Raleigh has been an active participant in his community in addition to his professional youth development responsibilities. He developed a large community garden on his own property which enables neighbors to grow fresh vegetables. He has also planted huge crops of sweet corn and pumpkins which he has sold at a roadside stand and donated to various charitable organizations. Each fall he would raise money for the CSU Collegiate 4-H club by filling his pickup with pumpkins, park it on campus, put a sign in the window asking for donations and crack the windows for people to slip in dollar bills,” said Leidheiser.

Brooks and his wife Edith are also active members at the Timnath Presbyterian Church and sing in the choir.

The National 4-H Hall of Fame was established in 2002 as part of the Centennial Project of the NAE4-HA, and partners with National 4-H Council and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA. For more information about the National 4-H Hall of Fame event and past recipients, please visit http://www.NAE4ha.com/HOF.