Trails and Rails Museum hosts 24th Annual Christmas Tree Walk | TheFencePost.com

Trails and Rails Museum hosts 24th Annual Christmas Tree Walk

Sam Bates Kearney, Neb.

Five inches of snow covered the grounds of the Trails and Rails Museum in Kearney, Neb., Saturday, Dec. 2, cancelling the day’s annual Christmas Tree Walk. However, that did not stop visitors form patrolling the frozen buildings the next day to admire the time-honored tradition of the Christmas tree.

More than 20 trees are scattered throughout various buildings at the museum for the event, now in its 24th year. Businesses, organizations, and groups in the community were invited to decorate a tree to be on display for the first two weekends in December. This year’s theme was “Reflections of Christmas,” which participants used to decide how to decorate their trees.

Jennifer Murrish, of the Buffalo County Historical Society, which owns and operates the Trails and Rails museum, said they expect a good turnout for the event this year, based on past years. “Annually, around 250 folks come in to view the trees and enjoy the historic atmosphere,” Murrish said.

Those attending the event can vote for their favorite tree by placing pennies in jars by the trees they like. Other change such as quarters and dollars can be placed in jars for trees they want to vote against. The tree that gets the most positive votes wins a gift certificate donated by Eileen’s Cookies for a pizza-size cookie, which is something that organizations love, says Murrish.

The donations made by visitors to the museum go to the general fund of the Buffalo County Historical Society and benefit the Trails and Rails Museum. The “Penny War” donations provide for preservation, maintenance, education, special events and operational expenses of the Trails and Rails Museum and also “help preserve Buffalo County’s vast history.” Last year, $400 was raised for the Buffalo County Historical Society, says Murrish.

Also available at the museum during the Christmas Tree Walk is the exhibit by the Central Nebraska Woodcarvers located in the Boyd House. Each ornament on their tree is hand-carved, and visitors are free to watch and ask questions as woodcarvers demonstrate their carving abilities. The Nebraska Woodcarvers have been the winner of the “Penny War” since the contest began.

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The Christmas Tree Walk would not be possible without the people who put so much work into their trees every year, including volunteers. Murrish says the “(Buffalo County Historical Society) truly appreciates the organizations that dedicate time and effort to annually make ornaments that tie in with their mission and the new theme for the Christmas Tree Walk.”

When asked what her favorite part of the event is Murrish said “Watching kids of all ages bring in their baggies full of pennies to vote on their favorite tree is fun.” 

For those wishing to see the trees, they will be on display at the Trails and Rails Museum Dec. 10 and 11 from 1-5 p.m. with $5 admission and free refreshments such as popcorn and cookies. The Trails and Rails Museum is located on the route of the Mormon Trail, about one mile from I-80 Exit 272.

Five inches of snow covered the grounds of the Trails and Rails Museum in Kearney, Neb., Saturday, Dec. 2, cancelling the day’s annual Christmas Tree Walk. However, that did not stop visitors form patrolling the frozen buildings the next day to admire the time-honored tradition of the Christmas tree.

More than 20 trees are scattered throughout various buildings at the museum for the event, now in its 24th year. Businesses, organizations, and groups in the community were invited to decorate a tree to be on display for the first two weekends in December. This year’s theme was “Reflections of Christmas,” which participants used to decide how to decorate their trees.

Jennifer Murrish, of the Buffalo County Historical Society, which owns and operates the Trails and Rails museum, said they expect a good turnout for the event this year, based on past years. “Annually, around 250 folks come in to view the trees and enjoy the historic atmosphere,” Murrish said.

Those attending the event can vote for their favorite tree by placing pennies in jars by the trees they like. Other change such as quarters and dollars can be placed in jars for trees they want to vote against. The tree that gets the most positive votes wins a gift certificate donated by Eileen’s Cookies for a pizza-size cookie, which is something that organizations love, says Murrish.

The donations made by visitors to the museum go to the general fund of the Buffalo County Historical Society and benefit the Trails and Rails Museum. The “Penny War” donations provide for preservation, maintenance, education, special events and operational expenses of the Trails and Rails Museum and also “help preserve Buffalo County’s vast history.” Last year, $400 was raised for the Buffalo County Historical Society, says Murrish.

Also available at the museum during the Christmas Tree Walk is the exhibit by the Central Nebraska Woodcarvers located in the Boyd House. Each ornament on their tree is hand-carved, and visitors are free to watch and ask questions as woodcarvers demonstrate their carving abilities. The Nebraska Woodcarvers have been the winner of the “Penny War” since the contest began.

The Christmas Tree Walk would not be possible without the people who put so much work into their trees every year, including volunteers. Murrish says the “(Buffalo County Historical Society) truly appreciates the organizations that dedicate time and effort to annually make ornaments that tie in with their mission and the new theme for the Christmas Tree Walk.”

When asked what her favorite part of the event is Murrish said “Watching kids of all ages bring in their baggies full of pennies to vote on their favorite tree is fun.” 

For those wishing to see the trees, they will be on display at the Trails and Rails Museum Dec. 10 and 11 from 1-5 p.m. with $5 admission and free refreshments such as popcorn and cookies. The Trails and Rails Museum is located on the route of the Mormon Trail, about one mile from I-80 Exit 272.

Five inches of snow covered the grounds of the Trails and Rails Museum in Kearney, Neb., Saturday, Dec. 2, cancelling the day’s annual Christmas Tree Walk. However, that did not stop visitors form patrolling the frozen buildings the next day to admire the time-honored tradition of the Christmas tree.

More than 20 trees are scattered throughout various buildings at the museum for the event, now in its 24th year. Businesses, organizations, and groups in the community were invited to decorate a tree to be on display for the first two weekends in December. This year’s theme was “Reflections of Christmas,” which participants used to decide how to decorate their trees.

Jennifer Murrish, of the Buffalo County Historical Society, which owns and operates the Trails and Rails museum, said they expect a good turnout for the event this year, based on past years. “Annually, around 250 folks come in to view the trees and enjoy the historic atmosphere,” Murrish said.

Those attending the event can vote for their favorite tree by placing pennies in jars by the trees they like. Other change such as quarters and dollars can be placed in jars for trees they want to vote against. The tree that gets the most positive votes wins a gift certificate donated by Eileen’s Cookies for a pizza-size cookie, which is something that organizations love, says Murrish.

The donations made by visitors to the museum go to the general fund of the Buffalo County Historical Society and benefit the Trails and Rails Museum. The “Penny War” donations provide for preservation, maintenance, education, special events and operational expenses of the Trails and Rails Museum and also “help preserve Buffalo County’s vast history.” Last year, $400 was raised for the Buffalo County Historical Society, says Murrish.

Also available at the museum during the Christmas Tree Walk is the exhibit by the Central Nebraska Woodcarvers located in the Boyd House. Each ornament on their tree is hand-carved, and visitors are free to watch and ask questions as woodcarvers demonstrate their carving abilities. The Nebraska Woodcarvers have been the winner of the “Penny War” since the contest began.

The Christmas Tree Walk would not be possible without the people who put so much work into their trees every year, including volunteers. Murrish says the “(Buffalo County Historical Society) truly appreciates the organizations that dedicate time and effort to annually make ornaments that tie in with their mission and the new theme for the Christmas Tree Walk.”

When asked what her favorite part of the event is Murrish said “Watching kids of all ages bring in their baggies full of pennies to vote on their favorite tree is fun.” 

For those wishing to see the trees, they will be on display at the Trails and Rails Museum Dec. 10 and 11 from 1-5 p.m. with $5 admission and free refreshments such as popcorn and cookies. The Trails and Rails Museum is located on the route of the Mormon Trail, about one mile from I-80 Exit 272.

Five inches of snow covered the grounds of the Trails and Rails Museum in Kearney, Neb., Saturday, Dec. 2, cancelling the day’s annual Christmas Tree Walk. However, that did not stop visitors form patrolling the frozen buildings the next day to admire the time-honored tradition of the Christmas tree.

More than 20 trees are scattered throughout various buildings at the museum for the event, now in its 24th year. Businesses, organizations, and groups in the community were invited to decorate a tree to be on display for the first two weekends in December. This year’s theme was “Reflections of Christmas,” which participants used to decide how to decorate their trees.

Jennifer Murrish, of the Buffalo County Historical Society, which owns and operates the Trails and Rails museum, said they expect a good turnout for the event this year, based on past years. “Annually, around 250 folks come in to view the trees and enjoy the historic atmosphere,” Murrish said.

Those attending the event can vote for their favorite tree by placing pennies in jars by the trees they like. Other change such as quarters and dollars can be placed in jars for trees they want to vote against. The tree that gets the most positive votes wins a gift certificate donated by Eileen’s Cookies for a pizza-size cookie, which is something that organizations love, says Murrish.

The donations made by visitors to the museum go to the general fund of the Buffalo County Historical Society and benefit the Trails and Rails Museum. The “Penny War” donations provide for preservation, maintenance, education, special events and operational expenses of the Trails and Rails Museum and also “help preserve Buffalo County’s vast history.” Last year, $400 was raised for the Buffalo County Historical Society, says Murrish.

Also available at the museum during the Christmas Tree Walk is the exhibit by the Central Nebraska Woodcarvers located in the Boyd House. Each ornament on their tree is hand-carved, and visitors are free to watch and ask questions as woodcarvers demonstrate their carving abilities. The Nebraska Woodcarvers have been the winner of the “Penny War” since the contest began.

The Christmas Tree Walk would not be possible without the people who put so much work into their trees every year, including volunteers. Murrish says the “(Buffalo County Historical Society) truly appreciates the organizations that dedicate time and effort to annually make ornaments that tie in with their mission and the new theme for the Christmas Tree Walk.”

When asked what her favorite part of the event is Murrish said “Watching kids of all ages bring in their baggies full of pennies to vote on their favorite tree is fun.” 

For those wishing to see the trees, they will be on display at the Trails and Rails Museum Dec. 10 and 11 from 1-5 p.m. with $5 admission and free refreshments such as popcorn and cookies. The Trails and Rails Museum is located on the route of the Mormon Trail, about one mile from I-80 Exit 272.