Weld County Fair celebrates 93 years | TheFencePost.com

Weld County Fair celebrates 93 years

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

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Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.

Even after 93 years, the Weld County Fair is still one of the county’s highlights, as the county itself celebrates 150 years. This year’s county fair, held from July 27-Aug. 1 at the Island Grove Regional Park in Greeley, Colo., showcases the number one agricultural producing county in Colorado.

The fair hosts a multitude of events, from livestock shows to a brand new Fiddle Fest, as well as a community barbeque and livestock sale. “I thought fair went really, really well. Our entries were up some from last year overall,” said Fair Coordinator Janet Konkel.

All together the fair had a little over 7,000 entries total, and 2,800 of those were livestock. Other entries included crop production, fine arts and crafts, shooting sports, carpentry, sewing, baking and more. “We hope people will bring their kids out and show them about everything we have at the fair. There is a lot to see and do. It’s a fun place to bring your family,” said Konkel.

The livestock sale brought in a total of $427,733.00, on over 240 animals sold. The biggest check went to Jaylinn Lohr, who exhibited the Grand Champion steer. Dr. Rick Mellin, an oral surgeon from Greeley, Colo., purchased the 1,347-pound steer.

The other champion animals also brought in large checks. The champion swine, exhibited by Ryleigh Carr, sold for $7,500 to Anadarko, which also bought Faith Fetzer’s champion goat for $2,100, Grace Goad’s champion chickens for $3,000, and Hans Vickland’s champion turkeys for $1,500. The champion lamb, exhibited by Lindsay Bowman, sold for $3,500 to JBS Lamb. The champion rabbits, shown by Brianna Folchert, sold for $1,150 to Cedar Creek Wind Energy.

The livestock shows allow 4-H and FFA members to showcase their animal projects, as well as compete in market and breeding classes. This year the fair offered market shows for goats, hogs, cattle, sheep, rabbits and poultry. Other livestock shows included dairy goat and dairy cattle, bucket calves and pigeons.

Brooke Franke, 7, from Keensburg, competed in the bucket calf show with her 6-week-old calf Roxy. “I worked with her every day, getting her to walk and follow me,” Franke said.

Other exhibitors included Megan and Mindi Podtburg, who competed in the market sheep show. “Showing sheep this year allowed me to learn to be more responsible because I had to take care of them,” said Megan Podtburg, who had her first experience showing animals at the far this year. “I can’t wait to do it again next year.”

Podtburg also competed in the Horseless Horse competition. “It is a great program. The competition is for students who don’t have a horse. They have to visit local feed stores, veterinarians and farriers to find out how much it costs to keep a horse for a year. It was a good way to show them what it takes to keep a horse,” said Elli Podtburg, Megan’s mother.

Western and English horse shows were also held, as well as a dog show and a draft horse show. The livestock shows included a showmanship class, in which students show their animals and answer questions about their projects. Students who win in their species then compete in either the small or large animal round robin showmanship, depending on the species they showed.

One program that is special to the Weld County Fair is Cattle for Kids. Roy Wardell, the coordinator for the program, helped start the program. “The breeding beef show was going down. This county is an important beef county, and we wanted to build the show back up,” Wardell said.

He added, “I’ve raised breeding stock my whole life. I like to see kids raising cattle and learning about animals. I believe young people learn about themselves and gain a broader life perspective when they work with animals.”

Each year, students are randomly drawn to receive a $1,200 scholarship to be used for the purchase of a heifer, to be shown at the fair. This year the program gave scholarships to four students, and last year three were awarded. “The students have to have shown in the breeding show this year to be eligible for the scholarship,” Wardell said. “They also have to purchase their heifer from a Weld County breeder.”

Three years ago, the program added the cow/calf incentive. Students who bring a calf out of their purchased heifer automatically receive a $100 bonus. The breeding show also gives out premiums, and handed out $4,000 in prize money this year. “Students who bring steers can sell them at the sale, but there was no money for heifers. Now there is,” Wardell said. “Almost all of our donors are Weld County Producers.”

The Fiddle Fest, which is a first time event for the fair, was brought in because of its success at the Elbert County Fair. Konkel said, “We have a committee that does entertainment. It was just something the committee thought was something that would bring excitement to the fair. It really had a fair flavor to it. Our fair has no admission cost, and no parking cost. We are a kid family, family friendly fair. We felt the fiddle fest fit right in.”

The community barbeque on July 31, brought out over 2,000 people, and pulled pork, beans, potato chips, milk and ice cream were served. It was CSU day at the Weld County Fair, and CAM the Ram was there to greet people.

Sunday was also Anadarko Days. Anadarko is a major sponsor of the fair, pledging over $7,500 and qualifying as a Grand Champion level Sponsor. The other Grand Champion Level sponsors are Nobel Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

“We also have a group of other sponsors who provide free lunch to our volunteers every day. This includes Texas Road House, Valley Packing and Catering, JW Wireline, Ensign Energy, Old Chicago, Jimmy Johns, Reid Ranches and King Soopers. They feed 30-200 people every day throughout the fair,” she said.

Over 20 other sponsors help to keep the fair running each year. “Most of them just give money and say use it in the place it’s most needed. The sponsors allow us to do extra things and provide extra programs,” said Konkel.