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Wild Lane Bed and Breakfast Inn

Anna Aughenbaugh
Fort Collins, Colo.

Walking into the sun porch of this 101-year-old landmark home is just the beginning of a delightful experience. Each room is filled with furniture that has been in the Wild family since the early 1900s. The library shelves are filled with books that belonged to Grandmother Mary Wild who was an avid reader. The huge painting of the house that Afred Wild commissioned in 1907 shows a Stanley Steamer taking guests to Estes Park. The spacious guest rooms give a feeling of being royalty at least for a day.

Steven Wild’s grandparents, Afred and Annie Wild, journeyed from Lancaster, Pa., to Colorado in 1878. They homesteaded two quarter-sections 2.2 miles from what is now the intersection of Wilson Avenue and Highway 34 in Loveland.

Afred built a simple house, then put his energy and knowledge of horticulture into growing hops which he sold to the Sango Brewery in Denver. Next he planted 2,000 apple trees that produced apples to sell and for making cider vinegar.

The Louden ditch company had built an irrigation ditch close-by in the 1870s, but it wouldn’t hold water. Afred found the problem to be the gypsum in the soil, which led to his building a crude plaster company. In 1890 he built a full scale plaster mill that lasted about 40 years. This entrepreneurial man became Loveland’s first industrialist.

In 1905 the Wilds used Masonville stone to build the elegant home and carriage house that sit at the top of the hill with spectacular views in all directions. The plaster walls were reinforced with horsehair. The beautifully finished woodwork and pocket doors are still lovely. There are three fireplaces, a dining room, living room, parlor, library, and a spacious enclosed sun porch. The house is filled with charming family antique furniture that the Wilds had traveled to England to purchase for their new home.

Afred was 62 when Annie died at age 60. He soon married Mary, who was 21, and they had two children, Jane and Afred Jr. Their son was 13 when his father died at age 80. Mary remarried and they raised 1,000 acres of dryland wheat. She lived a simple life until she died at age 80.

Afred Jr. lived in California and took his sons to visit his mother and step-father where they learned to love being on the farm. He returned to live out his retirement in his boyhood home in the 1970s. Steven moved in with his father and put his degree in landscape architecture to good use. He spent a year tearing down outbuildings and putting in flower beds. He restored the house to its original beauty and added private baths to the five large guest rooms, having it ready to open as a bed and breakfast in 1992.

Meeting and gathering facilities are available to be enjoyed in the air-conditioned comfort of this elegant home. The beautifully landscaped lawn can be booked for garden weddings June through September. Steve can accommodate 100 people and will coordinate packages with everything from catering, tent and linens to music and a dance floor.

He is now refurbishing the carriage house to add another guest room. The 3,000 square foot garage is being changed to an art shop. Steve and his artist wife, Lanette, plan to bring in accomplished artists to teach workshops, with an emphasis on painting.

Steve’s grandparents and father would be proud to see that his love for them and the farm shows in this lovely Bed & Breakfast Inn.

Whether you want to relax in the parlor, or take a hike or bike ride on the nearby 8-mile nature trail, you can forget your cares and enjoy your time. Steve does the gourmet cooking and shared his favorite recipe for Chicken Dijon Crepes.

Walking into the sun porch of this 101-year-old landmark home is just the beginning of a delightful experience. Each room is filled with furniture that has been in the Wild family since the early 1900s. The library shelves are filled with books that belonged to Grandmother Mary Wild who was an avid reader. The huge painting of the house that Afred Wild commissioned in 1907 shows a Stanley Steamer taking guests to Estes Park. The spacious guest rooms give a feeling of being royalty at least for a day.

Steven Wild’s grandparents, Afred and Annie Wild, journeyed from Lancaster, Pa., to Colorado in 1878. They homesteaded two quarter-sections 2.2 miles from what is now the intersection of Wilson Avenue and Highway 34 in Loveland.

Afred built a simple house, then put his energy and knowledge of horticulture into growing hops which he sold to the Sango Brewery in Denver. Next he planted 2,000 apple trees that produced apples to sell and for making cider vinegar.

The Louden ditch company had built an irrigation ditch close-by in the 1870s, but it wouldn’t hold water. Afred found the problem to be the gypsum in the soil, which led to his building a crude plaster company. In 1890 he built a full scale plaster mill that lasted about 40 years. This entrepreneurial man became Loveland’s first industrialist.

In 1905 the Wilds used Masonville stone to build the elegant home and carriage house that sit at the top of the hill with spectacular views in all directions. The plaster walls were reinforced with horsehair. The beautifully finished woodwork and pocket doors are still lovely. There are three fireplaces, a dining room, living room, parlor, library, and a spacious enclosed sun porch. The house is filled with charming family antique furniture that the Wilds had traveled to England to purchase for their new home.

Afred was 62 when Annie died at age 60. He soon married Mary, who was 21, and they had two children, Jane and Afred Jr. Their son was 13 when his father died at age 80. Mary remarried and they raised 1,000 acres of dryland wheat. She lived a simple life until she died at age 80.

Afred Jr. lived in California and took his sons to visit his mother and step-father where they learned to love being on the farm. He returned to live out his retirement in his boyhood home in the 1970s. Steven moved in with his father and put his degree in landscape architecture to good use. He spent a year tearing down outbuildings and putting in flower beds. He restored the house to its original beauty and added private baths to the five large guest rooms, having it ready to open as a bed and breakfast in 1992.

Meeting and gathering facilities are available to be enjoyed in the air-conditioned comfort of this elegant home. The beautifully landscaped lawn can be booked for garden weddings June through September. Steve can accommodate 100 people and will coordinate packages with everything from catering, tent and linens to music and a dance floor.

He is now refurbishing the carriage house to add another guest room. The 3,000 square foot garage is being changed to an art shop. Steve and his artist wife, Lanette, plan to bring in accomplished artists to teach workshops, with an emphasis on painting.

Steve’s grandparents and father would be proud to see that his love for them and the farm shows in this lovely Bed & Breakfast Inn.

Whether you want to relax in the parlor, or take a hike or bike ride on the nearby 8-mile nature trail, you can forget your cares and enjoy your time. Steve does the gourmet cooking and shared his favorite recipe for Chicken Dijon Crepes.


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