Windsor Harvest Festival | TheFencePost.com

Windsor Harvest Festival

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Robyn SchererMembers of the Windsor High School FFA program proudly display their banner during the parade.

The annual Windsor Harvest Festival celebrated it’s 90th birthday this year, and provided fun for community members of all ages. A celebration of the coming of fall, the festival offered a parade, booths, and various events.

The celebration took place from September 3-5 in Windsor, Colo. This year’s theme was “90 years of tradition,” and the event was grand marshaled by Don Weinmeister, 76, and his wife, LaVay, 80. Don has lived in Windsor on Elm Street his entire life, and is a 1953 graduate of Windsor High School.

On the first day of the event, spectators were treated to an early morning balloon launch, a mud volleyball tournament, the Windsor Town BBQ, the Windsor Harvest Festival street dance and a late night fireworks display.

On Sunday, community members participated in the Lions Club Pancake Breakfast, which was served after the second balloon launch. During the day the arts and crafts show, commercial and food booths, and kid’s amusement rides and games were open, and that night the Lion’s Club hosted a bingo game. A new to this year Chili Cook off then took place, followed by a movie “Tangled,” which was shown in the Windsor Main Park.

On Monday, Labor Day, the annual parade took place, which is thought to have brought in more than 10,000 spectators. Ninety entries competed in the parade. Elaborately decorated floats, candy and lots of waving defined the parade, which lasted over an hour and a half.

The Windsor-Severance Fire rescue firefighters were also out during the parade, but they were collecting money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. This year, they collected $5,802.

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The rest of the day, the events in the Windsor Main Park were reopened, and visitors could enjoy their day off at more than 100 booths. According to event coordinator Casey Johnson, there were 40 more booths this year than last. A home and garden show was also available for community members to visit throughout the weekend festival.

One special event that took place on Monday was a concert by A Cappella Electric, a women’s barbershop chorus. They are based out of Windsor, and include women from Northern Colorado and the Southern part of Wyoming.

One young student who had an opportunity to promote an industry she loves was Kaitlyn Carson. Carson is the 2011 Larimer County Fair Dairy Queen, and she was at the festival handing out free milk, and talking to people about the importance of dairy.

Carson originally sparked an interest in dairy cattle when she decided to wanted to show a cow, but she didn’t want to have to sell it. She thought dairy cows would be perfect for this. She borrowed a heifer from Mountain View Dairy, and after that she was hooked.

“I take any chance I have now to promote dairy. I think it is an important industry, and I like doing this,” she said. “It is good to grow up with responsibility.”

Carson’s mother, Leisa Carson, is a veterinarian and owner of The Vets Animal Hospital in Windsor, and the 4-H leader for the Bits and Pieces 4-H chapter out of Windsor. “I feel strongly that kids should be involved in activities. They provide positive experiences as they grow up,” Leisa Carson said.

She believes that it is important to tell people about agriculture every chance she has. “In today’s society, so many people are out of touch with agriculture. People don’t know where their food comes from. This is a good experience for the kids to see that, and learn how to educate people,” she said.

“If we don’t educate, people will become more ignorant. We want people to learn about the industry so they can make educated decisions when it comes to their food choices. We need to support agriculture because that’s how we live. Anytime you can get out information, it’s a good thing,” she added.

The Carson family worked to educate community members about the dairy industry throughout the rest of the day, and I love milk stickers could be see on the hundreds of people who passed by the booth.

“We love milk, and we want other to as well,” Kaitlyn Carson said.

The annual Windsor Harvest Festival celebrated it’s 90th birthday this year, and provided fun for community members of all ages. A celebration of the coming of fall, the festival offered a parade, booths, and various events.

The celebration took place from September 3-5 in Windsor, Colo. This year’s theme was “90 years of tradition,” and the event was grand marshaled by Don Weinmeister, 76, and his wife, LaVay, 80. Don has lived in Windsor on Elm Street his entire life, and is a 1953 graduate of Windsor High School.

On the first day of the event, spectators were treated to an early morning balloon launch, a mud volleyball tournament, the Windsor Town BBQ, the Windsor Harvest Festival street dance and a late night fireworks display.

On Sunday, community members participated in the Lions Club Pancake Breakfast, which was served after the second balloon launch. During the day the arts and crafts show, commercial and food booths, and kid’s amusement rides and games were open, and that night the Lion’s Club hosted a bingo game. A new to this year Chili Cook off then took place, followed by a movie “Tangled,” which was shown in the Windsor Main Park.

On Monday, Labor Day, the annual parade took place, which is thought to have brought in more than 10,000 spectators. Ninety entries competed in the parade. Elaborately decorated floats, candy and lots of waving defined the parade, which lasted over an hour and a half.

The Windsor-Severance Fire rescue firefighters were also out during the parade, but they were collecting money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. This year, they collected $5,802.

The rest of the day, the events in the Windsor Main Park were reopened, and visitors could enjoy their day off at more than 100 booths. According to event coordinator Casey Johnson, there were 40 more booths this year than last. A home and garden show was also available for community members to visit throughout the weekend festival.

One special event that took place on Monday was a concert by A Cappella Electric, a women’s barbershop chorus. They are based out of Windsor, and include women from Northern Colorado and the Southern part of Wyoming.

One young student who had an opportunity to promote an industry she loves was Kaitlyn Carson. Carson is the 2011 Larimer County Fair Dairy Queen, and she was at the festival handing out free milk, and talking to people about the importance of dairy.

Carson originally sparked an interest in dairy cattle when she decided to wanted to show a cow, but she didn’t want to have to sell it. She thought dairy cows would be perfect for this. She borrowed a heifer from Mountain View Dairy, and after that she was hooked.

“I take any chance I have now to promote dairy. I think it is an important industry, and I like doing this,” she said. “It is good to grow up with responsibility.”

Carson’s mother, Leisa Carson, is a veterinarian and owner of The Vets Animal Hospital in Windsor, and the 4-H leader for the Bits and Pieces 4-H chapter out of Windsor. “I feel strongly that kids should be involved in activities. They provide positive experiences as they grow up,” Leisa Carson said.

She believes that it is important to tell people about agriculture every chance she has. “In today’s society, so many people are out of touch with agriculture. People don’t know where their food comes from. This is a good experience for the kids to see that, and learn how to educate people,” she said.

“If we don’t educate, people will become more ignorant. We want people to learn about the industry so they can make educated decisions when it comes to their food choices. We need to support agriculture because that’s how we live. Anytime you can get out information, it’s a good thing,” she added.

The Carson family worked to educate community members about the dairy industry throughout the rest of the day, and I love milk stickers could be see on the hundreds of people who passed by the booth.

“We love milk, and we want other to as well,” Kaitlyn Carson said.

The annual Windsor Harvest Festival celebrated it’s 90th birthday this year, and provided fun for community members of all ages. A celebration of the coming of fall, the festival offered a parade, booths, and various events.

The celebration took place from September 3-5 in Windsor, Colo. This year’s theme was “90 years of tradition,” and the event was grand marshaled by Don Weinmeister, 76, and his wife, LaVay, 80. Don has lived in Windsor on Elm Street his entire life, and is a 1953 graduate of Windsor High School.

On the first day of the event, spectators were treated to an early morning balloon launch, a mud volleyball tournament, the Windsor Town BBQ, the Windsor Harvest Festival street dance and a late night fireworks display.

On Sunday, community members participated in the Lions Club Pancake Breakfast, which was served after the second balloon launch. During the day the arts and crafts show, commercial and food booths, and kid’s amusement rides and games were open, and that night the Lion’s Club hosted a bingo game. A new to this year Chili Cook off then took place, followed by a movie “Tangled,” which was shown in the Windsor Main Park.

On Monday, Labor Day, the annual parade took place, which is thought to have brought in more than 10,000 spectators. Ninety entries competed in the parade. Elaborately decorated floats, candy and lots of waving defined the parade, which lasted over an hour and a half.

The Windsor-Severance Fire rescue firefighters were also out during the parade, but they were collecting money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. This year, they collected $5,802.

The rest of the day, the events in the Windsor Main Park were reopened, and visitors could enjoy their day off at more than 100 booths. According to event coordinator Casey Johnson, there were 40 more booths this year than last. A home and garden show was also available for community members to visit throughout the weekend festival.

One special event that took place on Monday was a concert by A Cappella Electric, a women’s barbershop chorus. They are based out of Windsor, and include women from Northern Colorado and the Southern part of Wyoming.

One young student who had an opportunity to promote an industry she loves was Kaitlyn Carson. Carson is the 2011 Larimer County Fair Dairy Queen, and she was at the festival handing out free milk, and talking to people about the importance of dairy.

Carson originally sparked an interest in dairy cattle when she decided to wanted to show a cow, but she didn’t want to have to sell it. She thought dairy cows would be perfect for this. She borrowed a heifer from Mountain View Dairy, and after that she was hooked.

“I take any chance I have now to promote dairy. I think it is an important industry, and I like doing this,” she said. “It is good to grow up with responsibility.”

Carson’s mother, Leisa Carson, is a veterinarian and owner of The Vets Animal Hospital in Windsor, and the 4-H leader for the Bits and Pieces 4-H chapter out of Windsor. “I feel strongly that kids should be involved in activities. They provide positive experiences as they grow up,” Leisa Carson said.

She believes that it is important to tell people about agriculture every chance she has. “In today’s society, so many people are out of touch with agriculture. People don’t know where their food comes from. This is a good experience for the kids to see that, and learn how to educate people,” she said.

“If we don’t educate, people will become more ignorant. We want people to learn about the industry so they can make educated decisions when it comes to their food choices. We need to support agriculture because that’s how we live. Anytime you can get out information, it’s a good thing,” she added.

The Carson family worked to educate community members about the dairy industry throughout the rest of the day, and I love milk stickers could be see on the hundreds of people who passed by the booth.

“We love milk, and we want other to as well,” Kaitlyn Carson said.