Wyo. governor praises decision to cover crop losses, prevented planting caused by tunnel collapse | TheFencePost.com

Wyo. governor praises decision to cover crop losses, prevented planting caused by tunnel collapse

Wyoming Department of Agriculture
The disruption affects approximately 107,000 acres of crops, or about 35 percent of the total acres irrigated by surface water in the North Platte River Valley in both states.
Photo courtesy Wyoming Farm Bureau

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Gov. Mark Gordon expressed his gratitude to Wyoming and Nebraska’s congressional delegations, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts and state of Nebraska agencies, and especially to state of Wyoming agencies for their collaborative efforts to address the ongoing needs of farmers impacted by the July 17 Goshen/Fort Laramie irrigation tunnel collapse.

These efforts contributed to the announcement by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency that crop losses and prevented planting due to the collapse will constitute an insurable event.

“We wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for the diligent work of the Wyoming Office of Homeland Security, Wyoming State Geological Survey, Wyoming State Engineer’s Office and the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, alongside our counterparts in Nebraska, to help provide the necessary information to open the doors for crop insurance coverage for producers in the affected area,” said Gov. Gordon.

“The state of Wyoming will continue our ongoing efforts to obtain additional assistance for farmers impacted by this event. Many thanks to the numerous federal, state and local elected officials for bringing their resources to the table as well.”

The July 17, 2019 irrigation tunnel collapse and subsequent breach of a canal wall cut off irrigation to more than 100,000 acres of farmland in Wyoming and Nebraska. Work to repair the irrigation tunnel and stabilize a sinkhole that formed above the tunnel’s roof is continuing.“The Wyoming Office of Homeland Security, our other sister agencies and Goshen Irrigation District have provided much-appreciated leadership since the collapse,” added Doug Miyamoto, director of the Wyoming Department of Agriculture. “We need to continue this collaboration to ensure that the irrigation system is restored as quickly as possible. It is vital that we exhaust all avenues of potential assistance to our producers in the aftermath of this disaster.” ❖