Wyoming Angus Tour Spotlights Goshen County Ranches | TheFencePost.com

Wyoming Angus Tour Spotlights Goshen County Ranches

Curtis Grandstaff (R) owner of G-Wing Angus Ranch explains the merits of his Program during the recent Wyoming Angus Association tour. Curt Cox, a Director of the Association and MC for the tour assists.

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

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David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”

The Wyoming Angus Association has 69 member ranches across the state and was formed to promote the Angus ranches and Angus genetics in the state of Wyoming. The Tour is one of the highlights of the year for the membership and each year a different area of Wyoming is featured. This year the Wyoming Angus Tour featured eight Angus cattle operations and one Certified Angus Beef (CAB) feedlot in Goshen County.

Goshen County is in the southeast corner of Wyoming. It shares its eastern border with Nebraska and to the west are the bluffs that mark the western edge of the Short Grass Prairie. Torrington, Wyo., is the largest city and agriculture is the primary industry. Although Goshen County has a reasonable amount of natural water, it is susceptible to drought and much farming and some pastures are under irrigation. The rolling prairie hills and mild winters are well suited to cattle production. In 2004, the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce reported the annual production of cattle and calves to be 200,000.

The Angus cattle operations in the Tour ranged from small to large. All raised registered pure bred Angus. Some turned bulls out with their cows, some bred by Artificial Insemination (AI), and some did both.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a two-day affair which started at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch near Torrington, Wyo. About 60 people let some one else do the driving in the air conditioned comfort of a school bus and a line of trucks followed the bus. The first stop was a little west of La Grange, Wyo., at the G-Wing Angus Ranch of Curtis and Cheryl Grandstaff.

The Grandstaffs have rented their 1,600 acres, which runs up onto the bluffs, for 11 years. The G-Wing Ranch is family operated and runs 70 head of mother cows. Like all smart cattlemen, Curtis Grandstaff protects their most precious resources, which are grass and water. As Grandstaff puts it, “Eleven years ago, the drought was in here until the last two or three years. We could probably run 110 cow-calf pairs here during normal rainfall. The rain has been good for the last couple of years and the pastures are recovering, but we will probably hold at this level for a while.”

Grandstaff artificially inseminates (AI) his pure bred registered cows. He takes the bull calves to his feed lot in La Grange to background them and backgrounds the heifers on the ranch. He sells about 25 bulls a year for seed stock.

David Oedekoven from Sheridan, Wyo., and current Vice President of the Wyoming Angus Association expanded the ‘seed stock’ concept, “Seed stock are pure bred registered cattle. Grandstaff will keep some of his heifer crop, but some of them he will sell to other folks who raise registered cattle. The bulls will typically go to commercial owners who need a quality bull to put in their cow-calf operation that sells calves in the fall.”

The next stop on the Tour was Ken Hass Angus of La Grange. Hass Angus is a medium size seed stock producer. Hass says, “Our objectives are to raise bulls based on economically important traits that provide the most profitability for our customers. Our cows should calve unassisted, raise a big calf at weaning, feed efficient, and produce excellent carcass traits to insure a satisfying eating experience.”

Hass does no farming and does rotational grazing on dry and irrigated pastures. He has his own sale barn and feed lot. He backgrounds on site with a growth ration that consists of ground millet hay, corn silage, wet beet pulp, corn, oats, liquid supplement, Natur’s Way, and Amaferm.

Hass Angus sells about 300 bulls a year by private treaty and an annual production sale on the ranch. The sale is held in January each year. This year was the 29th annual sale and Hass Angus offered 140 pure bred registered Angus yearlings and two year old bulls for sale.

After lunch, the Wyoming Angus Association Tour hit the road again with a stop at Guest Angus and Quarter Horse Ranch, Hass G-H Ranch, and then back to the Booth family’s Cherry Creek Ranch.

The Booth Ranch is large, very high tech, diversified, and family operated. Shawn Booth has been working on the genetics of his cattle since the 1960s. He uses embryo transfer and recipient cows. Through modern technology and herd management Shawn breeds his cattle in the fall instead of the spring so that the cattle side of the business does not interfere with the farming side.

The Cherry Creek Ranch farm business consists of 2,000 acres, which will bring to market 12-15 tons of hay, 50,000 bushels of field corn, a couple of hundred acres of pinto beans, and a small acreage of sugar beets.

“Breeding for spring calves is the same time as planting season” Shawn says, “When you are trying to AI 400 mother cows, and plant 2,000 acres, and there is only three of you, one of the jobs is not going to go very well.”

Dinner was at the Booth Cherry Creek Ranch and consisted of some excellent examples of the carcass genetics that Shawn Booth has been working so hard to perfect since the 1960s.

The Wyoming Angus Tour was a big success. It showcased the diversity of Angus production in Goshen County and gave ranchers a chance for some well deserved fellowship. “The Tour is our chance to showcase what we offer as far as Angus genetics, and it helps the Angus breeders in Wyoming market their cattle.” Shawn Booth said, “Some of the best Angus genetics in the country are right here in Wyoming. They are outstanding cattle raised by outstanding people.”