Wyoming Mercantile drew tremendous crowd at Wyoming State Fair | TheFencePost.com

Wyoming Mercantile drew tremendous crowd at Wyoming State Fair

Gayle Smith
Potter, Neb.

Gayle SmithThe front of the Wyoming Mercantile.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goodies await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the midway at the Wyoming State Fair this year. A grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony was held on Saturday, August 20. On hand for the ceremony was Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, who cut the ribbon for the official grand opening.

Since the doors opened on the first day of the Wyoming State Fair, there was a steady stream of customers curious about what the store held, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council. “We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” she explained. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

Porter said they have also noticed quite a increase in sales at the new location. “We just needed to get moved to where our audience is,” she explained. “We have had so many people stop at the counter and compliment us on how much they like the store.”

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When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry, and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

During the week, Porter prepared some of the artisans food products and allowed customers to sample them. Breads, soup mixes, dips and coffees were among the food items offered.

In the back corner was an entire display of fiber clothing made from alpaca and sheep wool. Yarn and sheep and alpaca roving was offered for sale, in addition to hats, gloves, scarves and other items.

Several artisans who make jewelry also had products on display, some featuring Wyoming’s motto, the bucking horse. “Some of the jewelry is quite unique, and is one-of-a-kind,” said Porter.

Although the Wyoming Mercantile was only open during the Wyoming State Fair, many of the artisans have their products on the Wyoming First website at WyomingFirst.org.

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisan’s outside products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting, and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the artisans to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming Mercantile, Porter can reached at (307) 777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goodies await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the midway at the Wyoming State Fair this year. A grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony was held on Saturday, August 20. On hand for the ceremony was Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, who cut the ribbon for the official grand opening.

Since the doors opened on the first day of the Wyoming State Fair, there was a steady stream of customers curious about what the store held, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council. “We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” she explained. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

Porter said they have also noticed quite a increase in sales at the new location. “We just needed to get moved to where our audience is,” she explained. “We have had so many people stop at the counter and compliment us on how much they like the store.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry, and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

During the week, Porter prepared some of the artisans food products and allowed customers to sample them. Breads, soup mixes, dips and coffees were among the food items offered.

In the back corner was an entire display of fiber clothing made from alpaca and sheep wool. Yarn and sheep and alpaca roving was offered for sale, in addition to hats, gloves, scarves and other items.

Several artisans who make jewelry also had products on display, some featuring Wyoming’s motto, the bucking horse. “Some of the jewelry is quite unique, and is one-of-a-kind,” said Porter.

Although the Wyoming Mercantile was only open during the Wyoming State Fair, many of the artisans have their products on the Wyoming First website at WyomingFirst.org.

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisan’s outside products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting, and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the artisans to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming Mercantile, Porter can reached at (307) 777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goodies await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the midway at the Wyoming State Fair this year. A grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony was held on Saturday, August 20. On hand for the ceremony was Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, who cut the ribbon for the official grand opening.

Since the doors opened on the first day of the Wyoming State Fair, there was a steady stream of customers curious about what the store held, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council. “We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” she explained. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

Porter said they have also noticed quite a increase in sales at the new location. “We just needed to get moved to where our audience is,” she explained. “We have had so many people stop at the counter and compliment us on how much they like the store.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry, and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

During the week, Porter prepared some of the artisans food products and allowed customers to sample them. Breads, soup mixes, dips and coffees were among the food items offered.

In the back corner was an entire display of fiber clothing made from alpaca and sheep wool. Yarn and sheep and alpaca roving was offered for sale, in addition to hats, gloves, scarves and other items.

Several artisans who make jewelry also had products on display, some featuring Wyoming’s motto, the bucking horse. “Some of the jewelry is quite unique, and is one-of-a-kind,” said Porter.

Although the Wyoming Mercantile was only open during the Wyoming State Fair, many of the artisans have their products on the Wyoming First website at WyomingFirst.org.

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisan’s outside products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting, and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the artisans to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming Mercantile, Porter can reached at (307) 777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goodies await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the midway at the Wyoming State Fair this year. A grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony was held on Saturday, August 20. On hand for the ceremony was Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, who cut the ribbon for the official grand opening.

Since the doors opened on the first day of the Wyoming State Fair, there was a steady stream of customers curious about what the store held, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council. “We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” she explained. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

Porter said they have also noticed quite a increase in sales at the new location. “We just needed to get moved to where our audience is,” she explained. “We have had so many people stop at the counter and compliment us on how much they like the store.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry, and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

During the week, Porter prepared some of the artisans food products and allowed customers to sample them. Breads, soup mixes, dips and coffees were among the food items offered.

In the back corner was an entire display of fiber clothing made from alpaca and sheep wool. Yarn and sheep and alpaca roving was offered for sale, in addition to hats, gloves, scarves and other items.

Several artisans who make jewelry also had products on display, some featuring Wyoming’s motto, the bucking horse. “Some of the jewelry is quite unique, and is one-of-a-kind,” said Porter.

Although the Wyoming Mercantile was only open during the Wyoming State Fair, many of the artisans have their products on the Wyoming First website at WyomingFirst.org.

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisan’s outside products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting, and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the artisans to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming Mercantile, Porter can reached at (307) 777-6319.