Wyoming State Fair Celebrates 99 Years | TheFencePost.com

Wyoming State Fair Celebrates 99 Years

Gayle Smith
Potter, Neb.

Photo By Gayle SmithJustin Lewton and Brandon Lapp help hold Spencer Redland's market lamb while he gives it a final trim. Redland's lamb was the grand champion market lamb at the Washakie County Fair.

The air sizzled with excitement as the young man hurried to put the finishing touches on his 4-H dairy goat. After a long morning of washing, trimming and grooming the nanny, she was ready to take her turn around the show ring. Miss Beauty, the Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat, was fit for a beauty contest – at least one for goats. The prize-winning dairy goat had one win already under her belt – capturing the award for Best Udder at the Carbon County Fair. However, her owner, 12-year-old Kurtis Hays, was hoping another prize was in store for Miss Beauty during the Wyoming State Fair 4-H goat show.

Meanwhile, Spencer Redland of Ten Sleep was in the sheep barn giving his Washakie County Grand Champion 4-H lamb a final trim. He seems at ease visiting with friends, not thinking about later that afternoon when he would show the lamb one final time.

The Wyoming State Fair is the culmination for youth who have spent the last year working on their 4-H and FFA projects. The fair features the best of the best. Most of the exhibits have already received top awards this summer at county fairs throughout the state.

However, the fair is not only for youth, adults compete, too. During the fair, some of the best livestock, wool, hay, vegetables, and other general exhibits from across the state compete for top awards, and are on display for all to see.

Bill Reed of Casper, Wyo., brought several head of Lowline cattle to compete in the open other breeds beef show. Reed has shown in the open livestock show for a few years and enjoys being in the show ring. “I have shown cattle since I was in 4-H,” he said. “These Lowline remind me of the Angus cattle I showed when I was in 4-H. Showing is a lot of fun, and a great way to show other people what you have.”

Country Nights and Carnival Lights was the theme of the 2011 Wyoming State Fair. This year’s fair was a great way to spend a country night touring everything from the livestock on display to the various commercial vendors, to the Midway and carnival. The eight-day event also featured an antique tractor show and pull, a ranch rodeo, monster trucks, pig and mud wrestling, a Darryl Worley concert, PRCA bull riding and rodeo, and the ever so popular rubber chicken race/stick horse rodeo.

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Down on the Midway, crowds of people were excited to check out the Wyoming Mercantile, which was making its first appearance on the Midway this year. The store featured over 58 Wyoming artisans, who make everything from jewelry and pottery to food and clothing. Ann Wille of Baggs, Wyo., checked out some unique jewelry in store. “I love looking at unique, one-of-a-kind items,” she said while admiring a necklace featuring the Wyoming bucking horse. “The items you see in this store are things you can not find just anywhere.”

Next door to the store, a wool judge was carefully sorting through several sheep fleeces and evaluating the fibers to determine who had brought the highest quality, best fleece to this year’s state fair. Across from the wool building, 4-H members carefully put last minute touches on their cats to exhibit in the state 4-H cat show.

Linda Atkinson of Clearmont, Wyo., drew several curious eyes to her vendor display as she demonstrated how to spin fiber. Atkinson offered several products for sale, and had some of her Alpacas on hand for people to see.

Next year’s fair will be the 100th Anniversary of the Wyoming State Fair. The committee who organizes the event is already making plans to make the 100th annual event special.

The air sizzled with excitement as the young man hurried to put the finishing touches on his 4-H dairy goat. After a long morning of washing, trimming and grooming the nanny, she was ready to take her turn around the show ring. Miss Beauty, the Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat, was fit for a beauty contest – at least one for goats. The prize-winning dairy goat had one win already under her belt – capturing the award for Best Udder at the Carbon County Fair. However, her owner, 12-year-old Kurtis Hays, was hoping another prize was in store for Miss Beauty during the Wyoming State Fair 4-H goat show.

Meanwhile, Spencer Redland of Ten Sleep was in the sheep barn giving his Washakie County Grand Champion 4-H lamb a final trim. He seems at ease visiting with friends, not thinking about later that afternoon when he would show the lamb one final time.

The Wyoming State Fair is the culmination for youth who have spent the last year working on their 4-H and FFA projects. The fair features the best of the best. Most of the exhibits have already received top awards this summer at county fairs throughout the state.

However, the fair is not only for youth, adults compete, too. During the fair, some of the best livestock, wool, hay, vegetables, and other general exhibits from across the state compete for top awards, and are on display for all to see.

Bill Reed of Casper, Wyo., brought several head of Lowline cattle to compete in the open other breeds beef show. Reed has shown in the open livestock show for a few years and enjoys being in the show ring. “I have shown cattle since I was in 4-H,” he said. “These Lowline remind me of the Angus cattle I showed when I was in 4-H. Showing is a lot of fun, and a great way to show other people what you have.”

Country Nights and Carnival Lights was the theme of the 2011 Wyoming State Fair. This year’s fair was a great way to spend a country night touring everything from the livestock on display to the various commercial vendors, to the Midway and carnival. The eight-day event also featured an antique tractor show and pull, a ranch rodeo, monster trucks, pig and mud wrestling, a Darryl Worley concert, PRCA bull riding and rodeo, and the ever so popular rubber chicken race/stick horse rodeo.

Down on the Midway, crowds of people were excited to check out the Wyoming Mercantile, which was making its first appearance on the Midway this year. The store featured over 58 Wyoming artisans, who make everything from jewelry and pottery to food and clothing. Ann Wille of Baggs, Wyo., checked out some unique jewelry in store. “I love looking at unique, one-of-a-kind items,” she said while admiring a necklace featuring the Wyoming bucking horse. “The items you see in this store are things you can not find just anywhere.”

Next door to the store, a wool judge was carefully sorting through several sheep fleeces and evaluating the fibers to determine who had brought the highest quality, best fleece to this year’s state fair. Across from the wool building, 4-H members carefully put last minute touches on their cats to exhibit in the state 4-H cat show.

Linda Atkinson of Clearmont, Wyo., drew several curious eyes to her vendor display as she demonstrated how to spin fiber. Atkinson offered several products for sale, and had some of her Alpacas on hand for people to see.

Next year’s fair will be the 100th Anniversary of the Wyoming State Fair. The committee who organizes the event is already making plans to make the 100th annual event special.

The air sizzled with excitement as the young man hurried to put the finishing touches on his 4-H dairy goat. After a long morning of washing, trimming and grooming the nanny, she was ready to take her turn around the show ring. Miss Beauty, the Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat, was fit for a beauty contest – at least one for goats. The prize-winning dairy goat had one win already under her belt – capturing the award for Best Udder at the Carbon County Fair. However, her owner, 12-year-old Kurtis Hays, was hoping another prize was in store for Miss Beauty during the Wyoming State Fair 4-H goat show.

Meanwhile, Spencer Redland of Ten Sleep was in the sheep barn giving his Washakie County Grand Champion 4-H lamb a final trim. He seems at ease visiting with friends, not thinking about later that afternoon when he would show the lamb one final time.

The Wyoming State Fair is the culmination for youth who have spent the last year working on their 4-H and FFA projects. The fair features the best of the best. Most of the exhibits have already received top awards this summer at county fairs throughout the state.

However, the fair is not only for youth, adults compete, too. During the fair, some of the best livestock, wool, hay, vegetables, and other general exhibits from across the state compete for top awards, and are on display for all to see.

Bill Reed of Casper, Wyo., brought several head of Lowline cattle to compete in the open other breeds beef show. Reed has shown in the open livestock show for a few years and enjoys being in the show ring. “I have shown cattle since I was in 4-H,” he said. “These Lowline remind me of the Angus cattle I showed when I was in 4-H. Showing is a lot of fun, and a great way to show other people what you have.”

Country Nights and Carnival Lights was the theme of the 2011 Wyoming State Fair. This year’s fair was a great way to spend a country night touring everything from the livestock on display to the various commercial vendors, to the Midway and carnival. The eight-day event also featured an antique tractor show and pull, a ranch rodeo, monster trucks, pig and mud wrestling, a Darryl Worley concert, PRCA bull riding and rodeo, and the ever so popular rubber chicken race/stick horse rodeo.

Down on the Midway, crowds of people were excited to check out the Wyoming Mercantile, which was making its first appearance on the Midway this year. The store featured over 58 Wyoming artisans, who make everything from jewelry and pottery to food and clothing. Ann Wille of Baggs, Wyo., checked out some unique jewelry in store. “I love looking at unique, one-of-a-kind items,” she said while admiring a necklace featuring the Wyoming bucking horse. “The items you see in this store are things you can not find just anywhere.”

Next door to the store, a wool judge was carefully sorting through several sheep fleeces and evaluating the fibers to determine who had brought the highest quality, best fleece to this year’s state fair. Across from the wool building, 4-H members carefully put last minute touches on their cats to exhibit in the state 4-H cat show.

Linda Atkinson of Clearmont, Wyo., drew several curious eyes to her vendor display as she demonstrated how to spin fiber. Atkinson offered several products for sale, and had some of her Alpacas on hand for people to see.

Next year’s fair will be the 100th Anniversary of the Wyoming State Fair. The committee who organizes the event is already making plans to make the 100th annual event special.

The air sizzled with excitement as the young man hurried to put the finishing touches on his 4-H dairy goat. After a long morning of washing, trimming and grooming the nanny, she was ready to take her turn around the show ring. Miss Beauty, the Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat, was fit for a beauty contest – at least one for goats. The prize-winning dairy goat had one win already under her belt – capturing the award for Best Udder at the Carbon County Fair. However, her owner, 12-year-old Kurtis Hays, was hoping another prize was in store for Miss Beauty during the Wyoming State Fair 4-H goat show.

Meanwhile, Spencer Redland of Ten Sleep was in the sheep barn giving his Washakie County Grand Champion 4-H lamb a final trim. He seems at ease visiting with friends, not thinking about later that afternoon when he would show the lamb one final time.

The Wyoming State Fair is the culmination for youth who have spent the last year working on their 4-H and FFA projects. The fair features the best of the best. Most of the exhibits have already received top awards this summer at county fairs throughout the state.

However, the fair is not only for youth, adults compete, too. During the fair, some of the best livestock, wool, hay, vegetables, and other general exhibits from across the state compete for top awards, and are on display for all to see.

Bill Reed of Casper, Wyo., brought several head of Lowline cattle to compete in the open other breeds beef show. Reed has shown in the open livestock show for a few years and enjoys being in the show ring. “I have shown cattle since I was in 4-H,” he said. “These Lowline remind me of the Angus cattle I showed when I was in 4-H. Showing is a lot of fun, and a great way to show other people what you have.”

Country Nights and Carnival Lights was the theme of the 2011 Wyoming State Fair. This year’s fair was a great way to spend a country night touring everything from the livestock on display to the various commercial vendors, to the Midway and carnival. The eight-day event also featured an antique tractor show and pull, a ranch rodeo, monster trucks, pig and mud wrestling, a Darryl Worley concert, PRCA bull riding and rodeo, and the ever so popular rubber chicken race/stick horse rodeo.

Down on the Midway, crowds of people were excited to check out the Wyoming Mercantile, which was making its first appearance on the Midway this year. The store featured over 58 Wyoming artisans, who make everything from jewelry and pottery to food and clothing. Ann Wille of Baggs, Wyo., checked out some unique jewelry in store. “I love looking at unique, one-of-a-kind items,” she said while admiring a necklace featuring the Wyoming bucking horse. “The items you see in this store are things you can not find just anywhere.”

Next door to the store, a wool judge was carefully sorting through several sheep fleeces and evaluating the fibers to determine who had brought the highest quality, best fleece to this year’s state fair. Across from the wool building, 4-H members carefully put last minute touches on their cats to exhibit in the state 4-H cat show.

Linda Atkinson of Clearmont, Wyo., drew several curious eyes to her vendor display as she demonstrated how to spin fiber. Atkinson offered several products for sale, and had some of her Alpacas on hand for people to see.

Next year’s fair will be the 100th Anniversary of the Wyoming State Fair. The committee who organizes the event is already making plans to make the 100th annual event special.

The air sizzled with excitement as the young man hurried to put the finishing touches on his 4-H dairy goat. After a long morning of washing, trimming and grooming the nanny, she was ready to take her turn around the show ring. Miss Beauty, the Nigerian Dwarf dairy goat, was fit for a beauty contest – at least one for goats. The prize-winning dairy goat had one win already under her belt – capturing the award for Best Udder at the Carbon County Fair. However, her owner, 12-year-old Kurtis Hays, was hoping another prize was in store for Miss Beauty during the Wyoming State Fair 4-H goat show.

Meanwhile, Spencer Redland of Ten Sleep was in the sheep barn giving his Washakie County Grand Champion 4-H lamb a final trim. He seems at ease visiting with friends, not thinking about later that afternoon when he would show the lamb one final time.

The Wyoming State Fair is the culmination for youth who have spent the last year working on their 4-H and FFA projects. The fair features the best of the best. Most of the exhibits have already received top awards this summer at county fairs throughout the state.

However, the fair is not only for youth, adults compete, too. During the fair, some of the best livestock, wool, hay, vegetables, and other general exhibits from across the state compete for top awards, and are on display for all to see.

Bill Reed of Casper, Wyo., brought several head of Lowline cattle to compete in the open other breeds beef show. Reed has shown in the open livestock show for a few years and enjoys being in the show ring. “I have shown cattle since I was in 4-H,” he said. “These Lowline remind me of the Angus cattle I showed when I was in 4-H. Showing is a lot of fun, and a great way to show other people what you have.”

Country Nights and Carnival Lights was the theme of the 2011 Wyoming State Fair. This year’s fair was a great way to spend a country night touring everything from the livestock on display to the various commercial vendors, to the Midway and carnival. The eight-day event also featured an antique tractor show and pull, a ranch rodeo, monster trucks, pig and mud wrestling, a Darryl Worley concert, PRCA bull riding and rodeo, and the ever so popular rubber chicken race/stick horse rodeo.

Down on the Midway, crowds of people were excited to check out the Wyoming Mercantile, which was making its first appearance on the Midway this year. The store featured over 58 Wyoming artisans, who make everything from jewelry and pottery to food and clothing. Ann Wille of Baggs, Wyo., checked out some unique jewelry in store. “I love looking at unique, one-of-a-kind items,” she said while admiring a necklace featuring the Wyoming bucking horse. “The items you see in this store are things you can not find just anywhere.”

Next door to the store, a wool judge was carefully sorting through several sheep fleeces and evaluating the fibers to determine who had brought the highest quality, best fleece to this year’s state fair. Across from the wool building, 4-H members carefully put last minute touches on their cats to exhibit in the state 4-H cat show.

Linda Atkinson of Clearmont, Wyo., drew several curious eyes to her vendor display as she demonstrated how to spin fiber. Atkinson offered several products for sale, and had some of her Alpacas on hand for people to see.

Next year’s fair will be the 100th Anniversary of the Wyoming State Fair. The committee who organizes the event is already making plans to make the 100th annual event special.