Young rodeo athletes get quality instruction at PRCA Youth Camp | TheFencePost.com

Young rodeo athletes get quality instruction at PRCA Youth Camp

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

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Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.

The Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo., was chosen to host one of only 10 PRCA Youth Camps offered throughout the United States in 2011. Julie Jutten, Manager of Outreach Services for the PRCA has been the driving force to get this worthwhile program organized. To promote the Youth Camps, Jutten goes to where the kids are by using the same social media of Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter that the kids do.

“In 2009 Stock Contractors John Barnes and Maury Pate came to the PRCA with the idea of doing roughstock ground schools to give kids the opportunity to learn about roughstock events where they could stay focused on the fundamentals and on technique and safety.” said Jutten.

The goal of the Youth Camps is to provide a fun, positive rodeo experience. Camp curriculum includes an introduction to roughstock events with an emphasis on safety, fundamentals, chute procedures, livestock safety, overview of riding equipment, injury prevention and management, fitness and nutrition, introduction to PRCA business and goal setting.

The response to the program has been very positive among the kids and their parents. Dennis Yazzie of Cortez said, “My son has been riding a bunch of wild horses – rez horses – and I thought he was old enough to ride Saddle Bronc. I rode Bareback and I didn’t have the right support. I think if if he learns how to choose and handle the right equipment, he will have a better chance of riding these horses than I did.” The parents also appreciate the fact that their young rodeo cowboys are being given training and direction by professional rodeo cowboys.

The program is offered free by the PRCA and the curriculum has been carefully developed by the PRCA, roughstock contestants, and sponsors Justin Sports Medicine and Barstow Pro Rodeo Equipment. Besides the arena focused training, the program has an important class session on “Becoming A Champion” which discusses aspects of rodeo life such as how to choose a traveling partner, life on the road, and how to handle winning and losing.

“There is so much more to rodeo than getting on a bull or throwing a rope. Professionalism is a standard that cowboys should be held to.” said bull riding instructor, Jed Moore, ” The old cowboy code of honesty, integrity, hard work, dedication, and determination is still valid and these are the core values that have made cowboys what they are. Having these young kids learn about those values and how they apply them to their everyday life is just as important as how they do in the arena.”

Julie Jutten of the PRCA selects the PRCA cowboys that act as instructors at the Youth Camps. The instructors receive a very small daily amount that helps with their expenses, but essentially they give their time, talent, and experience for free. Most of the instructors can look back and say that they wish there had been a program like this when they were starting. All of them want to give back to a sport that they love.

The PRCA Youth Camp in Cortez, Colo., had some excellent instructors. Forrest Bramwell lives in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Forrest is a bareback competitor and has qualified for the NFR five times and also has seven Pace Shootout qualifications.

“The Justin Sports Medicine team has helped me tremendously. I want to give back as much as I can.” Forrest said, “I love this sport. It’s been my life for many years. I love to work with guys that are just coming up and trying to figure things out. I think that I can prevent a lot of injuries and help these guys get a better jump on this sport.”

In his ground school, Bramwell stressed the importance and proper way to ‘mark out’ a horse. He showed how to spur and set your feet faster using the Spur Magic exerciser from Barstow. There was training, using non-bucking horses, on how to end a ride and get to the pick-up men safely.

Lately the PRCA has seen declining numbers of Bareback and Saddle Bronc competitors. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the lack of training and practice facilities is certainly a contributing factor. “We don’t have a lot of guys coming up. There’s not a lot of schools helping guys out.” said Bramwell, “They’ve got to learn from the school of hard knocks. I went through that myself and it’s tough to learn that way. If you have more camps like this, it’s a chance for us to give them a better start on things.”

Darrell Triplet from Waterflow, N.M., was the Saddle Bronc instructor. Darrell has been competing in the Turquoise Circuit for over 15 years. “Everybody in my family has rodeoed. I want to give back to something that I enjoy so much.” said Darrell, “I figure that I can help them learn a little bit at these schools that would help them, not just at rodeo, but using rodeo to teach them some life skills, ‘cus there’s a lot of stuff in life after rodeo.”

The kids in the Bull Riding section were fortunate to have Jed Moore as their instructor. Jed has competed on the Mountain States Circuit for many years. Moore has two degrees in education from the University of Wyoming and has been named the Rodeo Coach of the Colorado Northwestern College rodeo team. “PRCA outreach programs are designed to continue education and to create desire in young rodeo athletes who are the future of the sport.” Moore said, “These are tomorrow’s professional athletes that we are coaching at these PRCA Youth Camps.”

The PRCA and the dedicated and qualified professional rodeo cowboys who teach at these camps are providing a real service to young rodeo athletes by giving them instruction in how to compete in their chosen events, and by providing a positive role model for them.

For information on enrollment or sponsoring a PRCA Youth Camp, please contact Julie Jutten at (719) 528-4729.