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Local talk

Words spoken in the vernacular, that is the language spoken by the regular people in an area of the country, may not be to the liking of some new residents or those thinking of moving to a new, rural area. Yet, you need to just get used to some words as you will hear them often.

When you go for a meal at a local café, the waitress will likely greet you with, “Hi, guys.” This is the collective noun for a group of two or more people; it is nongender specific. It’s the same meaning as, “Hello, everyone,” with a warmer, more welcoming intent. You’ll hear it when you are out and about as a greeting between girls or guys or both. It sounds a lot better than, “Hey, you,” doesn’t it?

For newbies who haven’t yet learned how to tell the difference in bulls and cows, another collective noun comes to the rescue. You can call two or more head simply “cattle.” As in, “I wonder what kind of cattle those white ones are?” You can imagine if you asked about “the cows” in a pasture as you drive by, someone may scoff and say, “They are not cows, they are bulls,” but if you use the word cattle until you know more, you will be covered.



In July 2018, the University of Wyoming spent one-half million dollars on a new ad campaign that yielded the slogan, “The world needs more cowboys.” For some reason feminazis, liberals and other loud mouth bashers took exception to the words and demanded it be changed, retracted, redesigned, or obliterated to meet their narrow viewpoint. For over 100 years, the University of Wyoming’s athletics teams have been called the “Cowboys,” and apparently no one objected.

Thankfully, the University of Wyoming didn’t give in to their obnoxious demands and kept the slogan intact. Why? Because people who live in this area of the country know the larger meaning of the word cowboy. It includes both genders and it is a commentary on people who work hard to arrive at their goals and to get what they want. Those who were so set against the slogan are namby-pambies whose only goal in life is to disagree with almost any idea that comes down the pike. There was talk that it didn’t include Indians; what, they never heard of an Indian cowboy? I know lots of them, many of them blue-eyed blondes who have enough Indian blood to be tribal members, and they know they are cowboys, as well as ranchers, horse trainers or farmers. The nomenclature surely doesn’t insult them.



And girls. Yes, we still call adult females “girls” and those of us who grew up here are not offended. It’s those who moved from somewhere else because they didn’t like how things were there, who are bothered. Realizing and accepting things are different here will help you to become acclimated more quickly, which will lead to a happier life for you and the community.


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Peggy Sanders

Treasures set in stone

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