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Nebraska’s Schick named Outstanding Young Range Pro

Bradley Schick, of Red Cloud, Neb., was recently awarded the 2018 Nebraska Section, Society for Range Management, Outstanding Young Range Professional Award.

This award recognizes contributions of younger range professionals to the advancement of the art and science of rangeland management. Schick is currently the University of Nebraska-Lincoln beef systems Extension educator for eight counties in south-central Nebraska. Before moving into extension, Schick worked at UNL as a research manager and technician where he worked with grazing management and improvement practices such as patch-burn grazing, pasture establishment, ruminant nutrition and native grass restoration. Schick has worked with a number of range and resource-oriented organizations including Nebraska Grazing Land Coalition, Nebraska Grazing Conference, Twin Valley Weed Management Area and Webster County Natural Resources Conservation Foundation. He is active in professional societies including Society for Range Management and American Society of Animal Science. Schick grew up on a family farming operation west of Battle Creek, Neb., and attended Concordia University in Seward, Neb., where he earned a bachelor's of science degree in biology with an emphasis in organismal environmental biology and a minor in chemistry and physical science. Schick earned his master's degree in range and forage sciences at UNL in 2016. His graduate work focused on smooth bromegrass managements for grazing cattle and compared carbon dioxide flux, soil nutrient movement and dung decomposition among different management treatments. During this time, he was also involved in other rangeland management activities and projects including prescribed burns, patch-burn grazing and plant response to timing of drought.

Kansan crowned National Hereford Queen

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Emily Meinhardt, Marysville, Kan., was crowned as the 2017-18 National Hereford Queen during the 2017 American Royal National Hereford Show in Kansas City on Oct. 29. Meinhardt will spend the next year in her new role as the face of the Hereford breed and an agriculture advocate setting a positive example for young women. Meinhardt competed against 10 other young women from across the U.S. for the title. The National Hereford Queen program is managed by the National Hereford Women. Queen candidates are evaluated on their involvement with and knowledge of the Hereford breed, behavior, attitude, appearance and interaction with producers, as well as their résumés and interviews. Judges look for a responsible, well-rounded young lady who is willing to spend an entire year traveling across the country to represent the Hereford breed to her best ability. First runner-up honors went to Melanie Fishel, Kernersville, N.C., Kira Sayre, Arenzville, Ill., was named second runner-up and Lillie Blissard, Water Valley, Miss., was selected as Miss Congeniality. Meinhardt is the 20-year-old daughter of Bryndon and Julie Meinhardt and is a junior at Kansas State University. At K-State she is studying agricultural communications and journalism with minors in animal science and industry and leadership studies. As a three-year member of her state association and the NJHA, she has been competitive in the showring and in the photography contest and has participated in the queen's tea.

Hereford breeders honored for 50 years in the business

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — In celebration of 50 years in the Hereford business, Hereford breeders were recognized for their commitment as Golden Breeders on Oct. 26, during the American Hereford Association Hereford Honorees Reception in Kansas City, Mo. This year's Golden Breeders are:

Boettcher's Brookview Acres — Clarence and Maryellen Boettcher, Fairchild, Wis.; Simpson Polled Herefords — Mike and Becky Simpson, Redfield, Iowa; Bill King, Moriarty, N.M.; Valley Creek Ranch — Scott and Judy McGee, Fairbury, Neb.; Morgan and Morgan Polled Hereford Farm, Alvaton, Ky.; McDonald Polled Hereford, Jane Lew, W.Va.; KLS Farm — Kevin and Kathy Stork, New Richmond, Wis.; Baker Polled Herefords — Paul and Sylvia, Elkhorn, Wis.; Marshall and Linda Walker, Los Molinos, Calif.; Lamar Polled Herefords — Emmett and Margaret Langness, New Richmond, Wis. ❖

WFP USA hires Karsting for its policy post

The World Food Program USA, a nonprofit organization that supports the mission of the United Nations World Food Programme, has hired Phil Karsting as its new vice president of policy.

Karsting was an administrator of the Foreign Agricultural Service in the Obama administration, where he promoted global agricultural trade and worked with nongovernment organizations to establish school feeding programs in developing countries through the McGovern-Dole Food for Education program. Before joining FAS, Karsting served in several key positions on Capitol Hill, including chief of staff to Sen. Herb Kohl, D-Wis., then chairman of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee, and legislative assistant to Sen. Jim Exon, D-Neb., on agriculture and natural resource matters. Karsting also served as senior analyst for the Senate Budget Committee where he handled issues relating to agriculture, rural development, housing, telecommunications, energy and the environment. He received a bachelor's degree in agricultural economics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is also a graduate of the French Culinary Institute in New York. "Growing up in rural Nebraska and helping my family's farm supply business sparked my passion early in life for American agriculture and food policy," Karsting said in a news release.

UNL grad student wins Maize-Asia Youth Innovator Award

Dinesh Panday, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln agronomy graduate student working and studying at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center, is one of the winners of the 2018 Maize-Asia Youth Innovators Awards. He was presented with the award at the 13th Asian Maize Conference Oct. 8-10 in Ludhiana, India, and was invited to present his work in maize research for development at the closing plenary session. Panday is a doctorate graduate research assistant in soil fertility and nutrient management and has been conducting research in the Scottsbluff area, while based at the Panhandle Center. His advisers are Bijesh Maharjan, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture and soils and nutrient management specialist at the center, and Richard Ferguson, professor and interim head of the Department of Agronomy and Horticulture. Panday's research aims to determine the effectiveness of high-carbon char in reducing environmental nitrogen loss and improving nitrogen fertilizer use efficiency in fertilized soils in semi-arid regions. The project uses sensors to detect maize nitrogen stress, predict grain yield and determine in-season and additional side-dress applications of nitrogen fertilizer, to reduce environmental impacts.

UW livestock judging team succeeds at the American Royal

A University of Wyoming livestock judging team member won the individual competition among 136 contestants, and the team placed fourth among 29 universities at the American Royal Livestock Show in Kansas City on Oct. 26. Laurel Rigby of Ronan, Mont., won the individual competition by nine points. She placed first in swine, third in beef and in reasons and seventh in sheep/goats judging. Her individual reasons score of 379, which is over a 47 average on eight sets, is an all-time UW record at any contest. Tyler Shaw of Kimball, Neb., was 12th overall individual, and 10th in swine and 13th in sheep/goats. Juan Gavette of Everson, Wash., was 12th in sheep/goats. The team was first in sheep/goats, sixth in swine, seventh in reasons and eighth in cattle.

The team also competed in three contests four days earlier in October. Rigby again led the team to a sixth-place finish at the Mid-American Classic in Hutchinson, Kan., by finishing fourth overall, fifth in swine, sixth in reasons and seventh in beef. Gavette was second in sheep/goats. The team competed the following day at the Tulsa State Fair in Tulsa, Okla., with the highlight being sixth in beef cattle. The team completed the weekend at the Texas State Fair in Dallas. Highlights included placing second in swine and fifth overall. The team's final competition for the national championship is at the North American International Livestock Expo Show in Louisville, Ky., Nov. 12. ❖

Colo. FFA Foundation announces its Ag Hall of Fame inductees

The Colorado FFA Foundation announced three inductees into the Farm Credit Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame. Jay Hickert, Akron, George "Buck" Hutchison, Englewood, and Dan Williams, Denver, will all be formally inducted into the Farm Credit Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame on Feb. 27, 2019, at the Renaissance Hotel, Denver at the annual Hall of Fame Banquet.

Hall of Fame honorees:

Dan — known to his friends as Danny — Williams is an Eagle County native who began his adult life raising sheep and cattle. In 1976, though, he turned his attention toward public service and became an Eagle County Commissioner. After two four-year terms, he was elected to the Colorado State House and served four two-year terms. In 1993, he founded the government relations consulting business, Williams+Simpson. His clients include Colorado Cattlemen's Association, Colorado Woolgrowers Association, Colorado Horse Council and many other agricultural — and infrastructure — related organizations. Whether as an elected official or lobbyist, for over 40 years Williams has been an advocate for agriculture in Colorado.

After playing baseball at Florida State University George "Buck" Hutchison came home to the family's lumber distributorship in Manchester, Iowa. In 1963, he created a western division in Denver and ever since, the recognizable HW logo has graced water tanks and gates on ranches and farms all across the West. Hutchison, however, was not content to have his influence contained to distribution and manufacturing. For 23 years he has served as the chairman of National Western Stock Show's Junior Livestock Committee, indirectly benefitting over 1,900 junior exhibitors during his tenure. Hutchison has also served or is currently serving on many civic boards and associations, from the J.K. Mullen High School Board to the University of Colorado Physical Therapy Scholarship and Endowment Advisory Board to the National High School Rodeo Association and the Roundup Riders of the Rockies.

Jay Hickert was born on the family homestead in western Kansas in 1926 and moved to Colorado sharecropping his aunt's land in the 1940s. Now, at 91-years-old, he's the patriarch of the family's farming, ranching and cattle feeding operations in Washington County. Over the years he was active on school boards, bank boards, co-op boards and livestock and farming associations. Throughout his career he worked closely with Colorado State University to assist on advisory boards and research projects. Hickert's influence as a thought-leader in the cattle feeding business expands across the West, while his reputation in his corner of Colorado is unparalleled.

NAD names Breinig new assistant director

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska Department of Agriculture Director Steve Wellman announced the appointment of Amelia Breinig to the position of assistant director. Breinig, who has education and experience in communications and international trade, recently began her NDA duties. Breinig is a native Nebraskan, growing up on her family farm near Arapahoe. She earned her bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in journalism and a master of business administration from the University of Minnesota. Most recently, Breinig worked at the Office of the United States Trade Representative. USTR is responsible for developing and recommending U.S. trade policy to the president, conducting trade negotiations at bilateral and multilateral levels, and coordinating trade policy within the U.S. government. Prior to that, Breinig worked in Washington, D.C., for Sen. Deb Fischer, Rep. Lee Terry and the Senate Finance Committee communications team. ❖

Groskopf recognized for grain marketing plan smartphone app

Jessica Groskopf, a Nebraska Extension Ag Economics educator based at the University of Nebraska Panhandle Research and Extension Center, was part of a team that received national recognition for their efforts to introduce farmers to the Grain Marketing Plan smartphone application, a decision-making tool developed by Nebraska Extension.

The National Association of County Agricultural Agents recognized Professional Excellence in Applied Research Posters at the Annual Meeting and Professional Improvement Conference recently in Chattanooga, Tenn. Third place went to the poster by Groskopf, along with co-authors Robert Tigner, Extension educator at North Platte; and Cory Walters, Extension specialist based in Lincoln.

The poster discussed adoption of the Grain Marketing Plan app by farmers who attended "Developing a Grain Marketing Plan" workshops, and the impact of the app on their decision making.

The smartphone app is a customizable electronic grain marketing plan with a built-in reminder system. Once a farmer has developed a marketing plan, they can input their decision statements into their smartphone. When a price or date target is hit, the farmer will receive a notice encouraging them to take action. The application features a pre-harvest and post-harvest marketing plans and is available for corn, soybeans and winter wheat.

Groskopf, who has been an extension educator at the Panhandle Center since 2012, and her colleagues conducted a series of workshops to help producers in developing and implementing grain-marketing plans using the Grain Marketing Plan app.

Extension Educator Arterburn on Cattle Business Weekly list of Top 10 Industry Leaders under 40

Jack Arterburn, Nebraska Extension beef systems educator in the northern Panhandle, has been selected one of the Top 10 Industry Leaders under the age of 40 by The Cattle Business Weekly, a leading agricultural publication based in Philip, S.D.

Every fall CBW selects 10 individuals who are making significant contributions to the industry to be featured in its annual herd reference guide, which was just released. Arterburn, who grew up in Sidney, has been an Extension educator since 2016. He is responsible for Extension beef systems programming primarily in the northern Panhandle counties of Sioux, Dawes, Box Butte, and Sheridan, but also statewide Extension education programs in beef systems.

In addition to Arterburn, this year's CBW Top 10 class consists of cattle producers, auctioneers, tech gurus, media experts, feedlot operators, beef educators and veterinarians. In addition to Arterburn, others named to the class are: Eric Knock, Tulare, S.D.; Monte Bloms, Carpio, N.D.; Kyle Shobe, Lewistown, Mont.; Steven and Amy Muller, Agar, S.D.; Brooke German, State Center, Iowa; Joshua Mohnen, White Lake, S.D.; Lacey Maier, New Salem, N.D.; Jordan and Drew Feller, Wisner, Neb. and Ellen Schlechter, Orient, S.D.

A selection committee designated by CBW selects the individuals every year from a pool of candidates. Selection criteria is based on the individual's involvement/accomplishments in the ag industry, what role they are playing in bettering agriculture for the future and what impact they have on their local communities.

"We always appreciate the different individuals that make up the Top 10. It's a great reminder of what it takes to make American agriculture what it is. This class of leaders is a great example of what the next generation of farmers and ranchers is doing today," said CBW editor Codi Vallery-Mills in a news release. Profiles of these individuals can be viewed in the recently published Cattle Business, Herd Reference Guide or online at http://www.cattlebusinessweekly.com.

Student research could increase farm yields

Two North Platte Community College students are conducting research that could potentially improve productivity for farmers across the nation.

Luke Christen, of Anselmo, and Patrick Haynes, of North Platte, Neb., have spent the fall picking field corn and analyzing its temperature and moisture content. It's all part of an internship that NPCC physics and engineering instructor Jared Daily lined up through the University of Nebraska–Lincoln West Central Research and Extension Office.

The collected data will be turned over to Iteris Inc., a California-based company that provides consulting services and produces sensors and other devices that record and predict weather conditions. It will also be distributed to local farmers to help increase yields.

Not only has the project taught Haynes and Christen valuable research skills, but it has also introduced them to a branch of engineering they hadn't previously considered — agricultural.

"I definitely want to go into some type of engineering, but I'm not sure exactly what," Christen said. "This internship allowed me to see another option that's available. I grew up on a ranch, but never fully realized how much of a boost engineering is to agriculture. I think it's great if we can implement new technology that will make life on the farm or ranch easier."

Although his primary interest is physics, Haynes also found value in the ag engineering internship.

"It's been a great opportunity to get genuine research experience, which will benefit me later in my career, no matter what profession I choose," Haynes said. "One of the most important things I learned is to be very careful when collecting data because there are all sorts of things that can change the results. Not being methodical can ruin the entire data collection, and it's crucial in these types of studies to provide an accurate representation."

A graduate of Mullen High School, Christen is attending NPCC on a basketball scholarship before transferring to either UNL or the University of Wyoming to continue his engineering studies.

Haynes is originally from Georgia. He moved around a lot before discovering North Platte where he decided to stay.

"There are better opportunities here than many of the other places I've been," Haynes said. "The college is my favorite part of North Platte. It's convenient. It's affordable, and the instructors are genuinely supportive. They care about your progress, want to see you succeed and will take the time to help you do that."

Haynes plans to transfer to the University of Colorado Boulder after graduating from NPCC. His dream is to one day become a physics instructor — possibly at a community college because of the positive experience he has had.

Nebraskans Steven Dent and Cort Scheer return to WNFR after successful 2018 seasons

After a successful 2018 season, two rodeo cowboys are swapping the corn fields of Nebraska for the neon lights of Las Vegas. Heading back to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December to compete for the title of world champion in their respective events, Steven Dent (bareback) of Mullen, Neb., is returning for the ninth time in his career, along with fellow Prairie Circuit competitor Cort Scheer (saddle bronc) of Elsmere, Neb., who notched his sixth invite to the prestigious year-end championship.

Needing a ranking of 15th or better in their respective events to qualify for the WNFR, Dent stood eighth by season's end and Scheer was ninth. Both cowboys reaped a harvest of over $100,000 in 2018 Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association checks to earn those slots.

"It's been a good year," said a humble Dent, who took home 11 bareback buckles in 2018. "It seems like I drew some good horses and was able to capitalize on those opportunities."

"It's been a great year," echoed Scheer. During the season, Scheer nabbed seven PRCA saddlebronc buckles, along with earning more than $400,000 at The American rodeo in Arlington, Texas. Although money won at The American did not count toward qualification for the WNFR, he earned more than enough in other rodeos to get his invite. "I had a good winter. I just kind of drew some really good horses later on in the year that kind of got that final push in there."

Despite his dozen accomplished years in the sport, Scheer remains enthused about returning to the WNFR.

"Oh, it's exciting," Scheer said. "That's the goal is to get there and once you get there, do as good as you can and see where the chips fall. I am really excited to go back."

A veteran of rodeo himself, Dent described the kind of help he receives behind the scenes to maintain the success he has had since 2006.

"My family helps me a bunch," Dent said. "My wife, she watches the kids and takes care of everything on the ranch while I am gone. Without that it wouldn't be possible. My parents have always been helpful if she needs something. It is a team effort, for sure. The way I look at it is the more I can win when I am gone, the less I have to be gone. I try to rodeo with that in mind."

TOP MONEY

While both cowboys are ranked outside the top five in their events, the significant added money at the WNFR gives every contestant a legitimate chance to win about $200,000 over the 10-day rodeo, which can vault every competitor on the scene to the top spot and a world title when the dust clears after the final round.

"It is outstanding," said Scheer about the amount of money up for grabs in the PRCA's annual championship rodeo. "I try not to think too much about 10 rounds, more or less, but … one round at a time. What I try to do is have my mind set on one horse and then move to the next one rather than thinking about the whole rodeo. But yeah, it is exciting to know you have a chance to win that much. There are dang sure a lot of places I could put it," he finished with a laugh.

"The WNFR is so good now (and) you can make so much money there that … if you still have the ability to make the WNFR, it makes it tough to not try," Dent said. "It used to be a good finals saw a few guys win over $100,000. After the new contract with Las Vegas Events, now there are a few guys that win over $200,000 It is really crazy."

On top of the lure in winning a world title and earning six-figure checks, the cowboys of the corn will both arrive in the city of lights to reunite with their rodeo family and satisfy their competitive spirits.

"I would have to say my favorite part of the WNFR is getting on great horses with my buddies and having a good time," said Scheer. "My whole family will be out there. You are in one spot for 10 days, so it is nice not having to jump in (a vehicle) and drive all night to the next rodeo. It is good to see all your friends and family. It is kind of a Cowboy Christmas kind of deal. Your whole rodeo family is there to hang out and have fun.

"Yeah, just getting on 10 good horses and riding against the best guys in the world," said Dent regarding what he likes most about the WNFR. "As a competitor, that is why you do it." ❖

— Rogers is a freelance writer and photographer located east of Parker, Colo. He can be reached at lincoln@lincolnrogers.com or

Schick of Red Cloud, Neb., recognized as Outstanding Young Range Professional

Bradley Schick, of Red Cloud Neb., was recently awarded the 2018 Nebraska Section, Society for Range Management, Outstanding Young Range Professional Award. This award recognizes contributions of younger range professionals to the advancement of the art and science of rangeland management.

Schick is currently the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Beef Systems Extension educator for eight counties in South-Central Nebraska. Before moving into extension, Schick worked at UNL as a research manager and technician where he worked with grazing management and improvement practices such as patch-burn grazing, pasture establishment, ruminant nutrition, native grass restoration and ruminant nutrition.

Schick has worked with a number of range and resource-oriented organizations including Nebraska Grazing Land Coalition, Nebraska Grazing Conference, Twin Valley Weed Management Area and Webster County Natural Resources Conservation Foundation. He is active in professional societies including Society for Range Management and American Society of Animal Science.

Schick grew up on a family farming operation west of Battle Creek, Neb., and attended Concordia University in Seward, Neb., where he earned a bachelor of science degree in biology with an emphasis in organismal environmental biology and a minor in chemistry and physical science. Schick earned his master's degree in range and forage sciences at UNL in 2016. His graduate work focused on smooth bromegrass managements for grazing cattle and compared carbon dioxide flux, soil nutrient movement and dung decomposition among different management treatments. During this time, he was also involved in other rangeland management activities and projects including prescribed burns, patch-burn grazing and plant response to timing of drought.

Schick developed an interest in rangelands and grasslands at an early age and is continuing to build upon that interest through his dedication to helping farmers and ranchers through his activities as a beef systems educator. The Nebraska Section, SRM recognizes Schick for his involvement in rangeland management and dedication to grazingland improvement

CCA and CCALT are now accepting applications for a fellowship position

The Colorado Cattlemen's Association and the Colorado Cattlemen's Agricultural Land Trust are offering a post-bachelor fellowship to develop future conservation and beef industry professionals who seek additional qualifications and experiences previous to entering their chosen career path.

The funded fellowships will span a one-year (12 month) time frame, beginning in January, focusing on basics of trade association and land trust competencies in Colorado's ranching and beef production industry. The fellows will serve as support staff across all sectors of each association. The varied experience will deliver broad association management knowledge, coupled with strategic execution of programs and services. Fellows will also experience each organization's extended networks, and have the opportunity to explore areas of personal interest.

Requirements:

Fellows must be prepared to work in a team environment while managing the execution of multiple tasks to meet deadlines and high-quality deliverables.

Well-versed technological skills are required to address evolving organizational models.

Earned bachelor degree in agriculture or natural resources related field.

Applied agriculture experience with preference toward beef production.

Located at CCA/CCALT Offices in Arvada, Color., with a 24 hour per week requirement.

Fellows will complete their one year, non-renewable term; and with the assistance of CCA/CCALT advance their experience, education and interests to potential employers or advanced career path pursuits.

Application:

Resume, cover letter and writing sample may be sent to:

Colorado Cattlemen's Association, Colorado Cattlemen's Agriculture Land Trust, 8833 Ralston Road, Arvada, CO 80002

terry@coloradocattle.org.

Nominations sought for Colorado Noxious Weed Advisory Committee

BROOMFIELD, Colo. ­— Five positions within the State Noxious Weed Advisory Committee will become vacant in December 2018. Nominations are now being sought to fill these important positions.

The primary responsibility of the committee is to discuss Colorado's weed management challenges and craft solutions that best reflect public and private interests. The committee then makes recommendations to the Colorado Department of Agriculture concerning designation of state noxious weeds; classification of state noxious weeds; development and implementation of state weed management plans; and prescribed techniques for eradication, containment and suppression of state noxious weeds.

The members of this committee play an important role in shaping department and state policy concerning noxious weeds. Their recommendations help protect landowners and the environment. The committee consists of 17 members who are appointed by the commissioner of agriculture. CDA makes every effort to balance the interests of the committee and to ensure different geographic areas of the state are represented equally. They meet quarterly at the Broomfield office, with at least one field trip and meeting out of the Denver area annually. Terms are two years in length and appointees are limited to two full consecutive terms each.

Positions becoming vacant in December are:

Agricultural producer (two positions) – one who engages in farming or ranching or growing non-traditional specialty crops.

Private landowner (one position) – one who can represent private landowners on the committee.

At-large (two positions) – one who can represent a perspective or profession or geographical area not served currently on the committee.

Nominations are currently being accepted and must be submitted no later than December 1st. More information can be found on the Noxious Weed program web page at https://www.colorado.gov/agconservation/noxious-weed-advisory-committee.