Larimer County, Colo., natural resources director is retiring | TheFencePost.com

Larimer County, Colo., natural resources director is retiring

LOVELAND, Colo. — Larimer County Department of Natural Resources Director Gary Buffington will retire at the end of 2018 after leading the department for the past 18 years. Buffington has guided the department through countless successes in conservation and recreation as it has met the challenges of increased demand for outdoor amenities in Larimer County.

Buffington grew up in Larimer County and took the helm of the department in May of 2001 after 27 years with Colorado State Parks. Since then, the department has expanded to include numerous new open spaces, facilities and trails, along with Larimer County’s weeds and forestry programs.

When Buffington started this position, the department had conserved 12,000 acres of land. Earlier this year, it crested the 50,000-acre milestone for land conserved in Larimer County with the support of its partners and private landowners. Today, the department manages more than a dozen open spaces, four reservoir parks, several smaller parks and 95 miles of paved and natural surface trails, thanks in a large part to Buffington’s vision and leadership.

During his tenure, the department built and improved day use areas, campgrounds and facilities on county-managed parks and open spaces, including a visitor center at Horsetooth Reservoir. In addition, in 2014, thanks to the work of community stakeholders, Larimer County’s 1/4-cent Help Preserve Open Spaces sales tax was extended for 25 years, to 2043, with 82 percent of citizens voting in favor of it.

After more than four decades working in natural resources, Buffington said he’s looking forward to traveling, enjoying the outdoors in Larimer County and abroad, and spending more time with his family.

Larimer County is in the process of hiring a new Natural Resources director and expects to have a new person hired to lead the department by the end of 2018.

Riemann named State Distinguished Alumnus

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Jim Riemann, Wamego, Kan., was recognized as this year’s Kansas State University Department of Animal Sciences and Industry Distinguished Alumnus on Dec. 3.

Riemann is an industry-leading authority in steam pasteurization of beef carcasses. He earned three degrees from K-State — a bachelor’s degree in agricultural education in 1966, a master’s degree in animal science in 1973 and a doctorate in food science in 1974.

Upon completion of graduate school, Riemann went to the University of Tennessee-Knoxville as a teaching and research faculty member in meat science. His research focused on meat animal composition, meat palatability, packaging and further processing.

In 1992, Riemann entered private industry, becoming director of a new beef research and development program for Excel Corp. (Cargill) in Wichita, Kan. He placed a strong emphasis on creating new food safety technologies, which resulted in two patented processes placing the company in an industry-leading role in food safety.

In addition to the research and development focus, Riemann worked with K-State’s David Shafer to host the state 4-H Meat Judging Contest for several years.

In late 1998, Riemann was named president of Certified Angus Beef LLC and moved to Wooster, Ohio. During his tenure, brand extensions of CAB All Natural and CAB Prime were created and the program was transformed into an LLC.

He retired in late 2006. In January 2011, Riemann left retirement to serve as Kansas Department of Agriculture assistant secretary and oversee nine regulatory programs. He retired from that role in August 2013.

Riemann and his wife, Nancy, reside in Wamego, Kan. They have two children and seven grandchildren. ❖