Passport to patrotism | TheFencePost.com

Passport to patrotism

Barbara Jo Guilford
Cheyenne, Wyo.

The Cheyenne Friendship Force Exchange with the Long Island, New York Friendship Force provided memorable experiences for capturing our common patriotic fervor. We spent two days in Manhattan, where our first president, George Washington was inaugurated. On Saturday May 21 we visited the Tenement Museum, took a walking tour of Ground Zero and the 9/11 Preview Site, rode a Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Mary Rubert, who hosted my husband and I, took us to Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay, Long Island.

We arrived at the Tenement Museum at 10 a.m. Our guide, Jeffrey Marsh, first took us upstairs to third floor for a peek at the lives of Julius and Natalie Gumpert and their four children who were German immigrants. Life was tough at the turn of the century – no windows, no indoor bathrooms, tiny kitchens heated with coal lugged up three stories, one bedroom shared by all and a small sitting room. Eventually Julius, who worked as a shoemaker abandoned his wife. There was no public assistance and Natalie took up dressmaking to support the family. We also visited the apartment of Italian Rosario and Josephine Valdesi who occupied an apartment in the late 1920s. The Valdesi apartment showed improvements – windows with screens that prevented tuberculosis and other contagious diseases, linoleum flooring, gas heating and cooking stoves, running water, and other kitchen improvements. Our guide then encouraged us to discuss immigration laws where we found similar conditions.

We then walked to the Ground Zero and 9/11 preview site. A number of our New York hosts had never been to the site themselves; their hesitation was due to ongoing grief for family members lost during the tragedy – 64 percent of the victims lived in the New York City area although victims from 115 countries were among the nearly 3,000 casualties. Five months following the 2001 attacks on the Twin Towers. Lower Manhattan was still polluted with dust and respiratory diseases are still being reported.

The Tribute World Trade Center Visitor galleries help tourists understand the shared memories and personal experiences of the events and pays tribute to the victims of the attacks. We moved to walk around the perimeter of destruction. Throngs of tourists pressed forward while trying to get a peek at the holes where the twin towers had collapsed. Workers holding lunch pails waited in the hot sun to have their eyes checked for access into the work site. Several of us then entered a Bank of America Financial center, took an escalator up to a viewing area and snapped photos of the abyss. My personal reaction to the site was dramatic, for it was like being punched in the stomach – it literally took my breath away. Then I took a photo that showed the power and strength of America at work rebuilding and my mind settled.

911 Memorial and Museum will open on September 11, this year, the 10th anniversary of the event. We saw a model of the 16 acre site with two reflecting pools. Waterfalls, which flow on all four sides of the two acre-sized pools, drop 30-feet. Four hundred white oak trees surround the area with an open space for special events. It will be a green and peaceful place for quiet and private reflection.

We rode the free Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island in the afternoon. I thought of my mother, Olinda (Buxbaum) Martin. She entered this country as a child and must have passed Lady Liberty. Mother was able to visit Ellis Island after her six children were grown. Ellyn Martin, her daughter-in-law, took her there on a long overdue vacation. The Lady with the Torch lighting the path rises 305-feet above the water. It was a gift from France and was finished in 1886. The Statue of Liberty Island gets more visitors than any other National Park in the USA except the Capitol and the White House. Crowds of visitors gathered and eventually were herded onto the free ferry. As before, the sight of the Statue of Liberty evoked strong patriotic feelings. Photographers pushed their way to a spot to take photos. The return ferry revealed the magnificent skyline of Manhattan.

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My patriotic mood returned as we entered Oyster Bay, Long Island on Sunday. The streets were lined with American Flags. Sagamore Hill, home of Theodore Roosevelt, was given to the American people by his family in July of 1962. Our guide, Brenton Casey, met our group at the door and explained the rules for touring the home – no smoking, no photos, and no eating – original furniture, hunting trophies, family possessions and mementos still remain. Theodore Roosevelt always answered the door himself and was prone to invite unexpected guests to lunch.

Theodore Roosevelt overcame a number of personal hardships and suffered many losses during his lifetime. He was tutored at home because of childhood illnesses and he developed a passion for reading. There are thousands of books in the Library that once served as the cabinet room and reception hall during Roosevelt’s presidential years. Roosevelt published more than 30 books including a text on the Naval Battle of 1812 that is still used as a textbook at the U.S. Naval Academy. He wrote numerous articles, editorials, political treatises and more than 150,000 letters. He described himself as a “literary fellow.”

Roosevelt retreated from public life after the death of his wife and mother on the same day, February 14, 1894. He purchased a ranch in the Dakota Territory and spent the next two years raising cattle and hunting. He came to believe that some places should be protected and left for future generations to enjoy. He established five new national parks; he extended protection over more than 230 million acres of public land. Roosevelt’s legacy as a conservationist has given Americans much to appreciate this year, the 25th Anniversary of the Passport to Your National Parks. Our guide asked us to help take down the American Flag at Sagamore Hill, Again my emotions swelled. I then visited the gift shop and bought my long overdue souvenir from New York, A Passport Book To Your National Parks.

Thank you Long Island Friendship Force for restoring my patriotic fervor.

The Cheyenne Friendship Force Exchange with the Long Island, New York Friendship Force provided memorable experiences for capturing our common patriotic fervor. We spent two days in Manhattan, where our first president, George Washington was inaugurated. On Saturday May 21 we visited the Tenement Museum, took a walking tour of Ground Zero and the 9/11 Preview Site, rode a Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Mary Rubert, who hosted my husband and I, took us to Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay, Long Island.

We arrived at the Tenement Museum at 10 a.m. Our guide, Jeffrey Marsh, first took us upstairs to third floor for a peek at the lives of Julius and Natalie Gumpert and their four children who were German immigrants. Life was tough at the turn of the century – no windows, no indoor bathrooms, tiny kitchens heated with coal lugged up three stories, one bedroom shared by all and a small sitting room. Eventually Julius, who worked as a shoemaker abandoned his wife. There was no public assistance and Natalie took up dressmaking to support the family. We also visited the apartment of Italian Rosario and Josephine Valdesi who occupied an apartment in the late 1920s. The Valdesi apartment showed improvements – windows with screens that prevented tuberculosis and other contagious diseases, linoleum flooring, gas heating and cooking stoves, running water, and other kitchen improvements. Our guide then encouraged us to discuss immigration laws where we found similar conditions.

We then walked to the Ground Zero and 9/11 preview site. A number of our New York hosts had never been to the site themselves; their hesitation was due to ongoing grief for family members lost during the tragedy – 64 percent of the victims lived in the New York City area although victims from 115 countries were among the nearly 3,000 casualties. Five months following the 2001 attacks on the Twin Towers. Lower Manhattan was still polluted with dust and respiratory diseases are still being reported.

The Tribute World Trade Center Visitor galleries help tourists understand the shared memories and personal experiences of the events and pays tribute to the victims of the attacks. We moved to walk around the perimeter of destruction. Throngs of tourists pressed forward while trying to get a peek at the holes where the twin towers had collapsed. Workers holding lunch pails waited in the hot sun to have their eyes checked for access into the work site. Several of us then entered a Bank of America Financial center, took an escalator up to a viewing area and snapped photos of the abyss. My personal reaction to the site was dramatic, for it was like being punched in the stomach – it literally took my breath away. Then I took a photo that showed the power and strength of America at work rebuilding and my mind settled.

911 Memorial and Museum will open on September 11, this year, the 10th anniversary of the event. We saw a model of the 16 acre site with two reflecting pools. Waterfalls, which flow on all four sides of the two acre-sized pools, drop 30-feet. Four hundred white oak trees surround the area with an open space for special events. It will be a green and peaceful place for quiet and private reflection.

We rode the free Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island in the afternoon. I thought of my mother, Olinda (Buxbaum) Martin. She entered this country as a child and must have passed Lady Liberty. Mother was able to visit Ellis Island after her six children were grown. Ellyn Martin, her daughter-in-law, took her there on a long overdue vacation. The Lady with the Torch lighting the path rises 305-feet above the water. It was a gift from France and was finished in 1886. The Statue of Liberty Island gets more visitors than any other National Park in the USA except the Capitol and the White House. Crowds of visitors gathered and eventually were herded onto the free ferry. As before, the sight of the Statue of Liberty evoked strong patriotic feelings. Photographers pushed their way to a spot to take photos. The return ferry revealed the magnificent skyline of Manhattan.

My patriotic mood returned as we entered Oyster Bay, Long Island on Sunday. The streets were lined with American Flags. Sagamore Hill, home of Theodore Roosevelt, was given to the American people by his family in July of 1962. Our guide, Brenton Casey, met our group at the door and explained the rules for touring the home – no smoking, no photos, and no eating – original furniture, hunting trophies, family possessions and mementos still remain. Theodore Roosevelt always answered the door himself and was prone to invite unexpected guests to lunch.

Theodore Roosevelt overcame a number of personal hardships and suffered many losses during his lifetime. He was tutored at home because of childhood illnesses and he developed a passion for reading. There are thousands of books in the Library that once served as the cabinet room and reception hall during Roosevelt’s presidential years. Roosevelt published more than 30 books including a text on the Naval Battle of 1812 that is still used as a textbook at the U.S. Naval Academy. He wrote numerous articles, editorials, political treatises and more than 150,000 letters. He described himself as a “literary fellow.”

Roosevelt retreated from public life after the death of his wife and mother on the same day, February 14, 1894. He purchased a ranch in the Dakota Territory and spent the next two years raising cattle and hunting. He came to believe that some places should be protected and left for future generations to enjoy. He established five new national parks; he extended protection over more than 230 million acres of public land. Roosevelt’s legacy as a conservationist has given Americans much to appreciate this year, the 25th Anniversary of the Passport to Your National Parks. Our guide asked us to help take down the American Flag at Sagamore Hill, Again my emotions swelled. I then visited the gift shop and bought my long overdue souvenir from New York, A Passport Book To Your National Parks.

Thank you Long Island Friendship Force for restoring my patriotic fervor.

The Cheyenne Friendship Force Exchange with the Long Island, New York Friendship Force provided memorable experiences for capturing our common patriotic fervor. We spent two days in Manhattan, where our first president, George Washington was inaugurated. On Saturday May 21 we visited the Tenement Museum, took a walking tour of Ground Zero and the 9/11 Preview Site, rode a Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Mary Rubert, who hosted my husband and I, took us to Sagamore Hill, in Oyster Bay, Long Island.

We arrived at the Tenement Museum at 10 a.m. Our guide, Jeffrey Marsh, first took us upstairs to third floor for a peek at the lives of Julius and Natalie Gumpert and their four children who were German immigrants. Life was tough at the turn of the century – no windows, no indoor bathrooms, tiny kitchens heated with coal lugged up three stories, one bedroom shared by all and a small sitting room. Eventually Julius, who worked as a shoemaker abandoned his wife. There was no public assistance and Natalie took up dressmaking to support the family. We also visited the apartment of Italian Rosario and Josephine Valdesi who occupied an apartment in the late 1920s. The Valdesi apartment showed improvements – windows with screens that prevented tuberculosis and other contagious diseases, linoleum flooring, gas heating and cooking stoves, running water, and other kitchen improvements. Our guide then encouraged us to discuss immigration laws where we found similar conditions.

We then walked to the Ground Zero and 9/11 preview site. A number of our New York hosts had never been to the site themselves; their hesitation was due to ongoing grief for family members lost during the tragedy – 64 percent of the victims lived in the New York City area although victims from 115 countries were among the nearly 3,000 casualties. Five months following the 2001 attacks on the Twin Towers. Lower Manhattan was still polluted with dust and respiratory diseases are still being reported.

The Tribute World Trade Center Visitor galleries help tourists understand the shared memories and personal experiences of the events and pays tribute to the victims of the attacks. We moved to walk around the perimeter of destruction. Throngs of tourists pressed forward while trying to get a peek at the holes where the twin towers had collapsed. Workers holding lunch pails waited in the hot sun to have their eyes checked for access into the work site. Several of us then entered a Bank of America Financial center, took an escalator up to a viewing area and snapped photos of the abyss. My personal reaction to the site was dramatic, for it was like being punched in the stomach – it literally took my breath away. Then I took a photo that showed the power and strength of America at work rebuilding and my mind settled.

911 Memorial and Museum will open on September 11, this year, the 10th anniversary of the event. We saw a model of the 16 acre site with two reflecting pools. Waterfalls, which flow on all four sides of the two acre-sized pools, drop 30-feet. Four hundred white oak trees surround the area with an open space for special events. It will be a green and peaceful place for quiet and private reflection.

We rode the free Staten Island ferry past the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island in the afternoon. I thought of my mother, Olinda (Buxbaum) Martin. She entered this country as a child and must have passed Lady Liberty. Mother was able to visit Ellis Island after her six children were grown. Ellyn Martin, her daughter-in-law, took her there on a long overdue vacation. The Lady with the Torch lighting the path rises 305-feet above the water. It was a gift from France and was finished in 1886. The Statue of Liberty Island gets more visitors than any other National Park in the USA except the Capitol and the White House. Crowds of visitors gathered and eventually were herded onto the free ferry. As before, the sight of the Statue of Liberty evoked strong patriotic feelings. Photographers pushed their way to a spot to take photos. The return ferry revealed the magnificent skyline of Manhattan.

My patriotic mood returned as we entered Oyster Bay, Long Island on Sunday. The streets were lined with American Flags. Sagamore Hill, home of Theodore Roosevelt, was given to the American people by his family in July of 1962. Our guide, Brenton Casey, met our group at the door and explained the rules for touring the home – no smoking, no photos, and no eating – original furniture, hunting trophies, family possessions and mementos still remain. Theodore Roosevelt always answered the door himself and was prone to invite unexpected guests to lunch.

Theodore Roosevelt overcame a number of personal hardships and suffered many losses during his lifetime. He was tutored at home because of childhood illnesses and he developed a passion for reading. There are thousands of books in the Library that once served as the cabinet room and reception hall during Roosevelt’s presidential years. Roosevelt published more than 30 books including a text on the Naval Battle of 1812 that is still used as a textbook at the U.S. Naval Academy. He wrote numerous articles, editorials, political treatises and more than 150,000 letters. He described himself as a “literary fellow.”

Roosevelt retreated from public life after the death of his wife and mother on the same day, February 14, 1894. He purchased a ranch in the Dakota Territory and spent the next two years raising cattle and hunting. He came to believe that some places should be protected and left for future generations to enjoy. He established five new national parks; he extended protection over more than 230 million acres of public land. Roosevelt’s legacy as a conservationist has given Americans much to appreciate this year, the 25th Anniversary of the Passport to Your National Parks. Our guide asked us to help take down the American Flag at Sagamore Hill, Again my emotions swelled. I then visited the gift shop and bought my long overdue souvenir from New York, A Passport Book To Your National Parks.

Thank you Long Island Friendship Force for restoring my patriotic fervor.