Transystems to haul sugar beets to Fort Morgan, Colo., and Scottsbluff, Neb., factories | TheFencePost.com
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Transystems to haul sugar beets to Fort Morgan, Colo., and Scottsbluff, Neb., factories

Company signs 10-year contract with Western Sugar

Come September 2022, Fort Morgan, Colo., and Scottsbluff, Neb., residents will be seeing a lot more green as Transystems begins hauling sugar beets for Western Sugar Cooperative, according to a company news release.

Transystems’ fleet of state-of-the art green trucks already works for Western Sugar at its Billings, Mont., location. The expansion to Fort Morgan and Scottsbluff was an evolution of Transystems relationship with Western Sugar.

Last summer, the company secured a renewal of its existing contract at the Western factory in Billings. As discussions continued, it was logical to examine the combination of Billings, Scottsbluff and Fort Morgan,” the news release stated.



Those discussions resulted in Transystems securing a 10-year contract with Western Sugar.

Activity for the Fort Morgan and Scottsbluff projects has already begun, according to Transystems. The company is scouting locations for maintenance facilities.



“Ideally, these facilities are on, or very near, the factory to assure high quality equipment and great communication with the sugar company,” the news release stated.

EMPLOYEES AND TRAINING

With a need for more than 100 employees to drive and maintain the trucks and loaders scheduled to go to work in Colorado and 75 employees in Nebraska, recruiting and training are beginning to ramp up.

“Transystems offers truck driving schools that take non-licensed individuals through a hands-on, individualized training course that makes them ready and capable of obtaining a CDL (commercial driver’s license) ” the news release stated. “This is a great way to begin a career as a professional driver.”

Transystems offers truck driving schools that take non-licensed individuals through a hands-on, individualized training course that makes them ready and capable of obtaining a commercial driver's license. Photo courtesy Transystems

Family owned and operated, Transystems brings years of beet hauling experience to the job, according to the news release.

Founded in 1942 by John Rice in Great Falls, Mont., Transystems is now in the hands of the second and third generations. Errol Rice is president of the company.

In the beginning, the company “fleet” was two well-used dump trucks. In the early decades, the company expanded to haul dry freight and petroleum products. The territory covered included the Western United States, Canada and Alaska.

In the mid-1960s, it became apparent that with some innovative trailer design and configuration, sugar beets could be economically moved by trucks over greater distances. Ultimately, almost all beets in North America turned to trucks rather than railroad cars.

Milestones in Transystems’ history of transporting sugar beets:

1968 – Designed custom trailers to transport sugar beets for Great Western Sugar Company at Billings

1969 – Added Holly Sugar Company as customer at Hardin and Sidney, Mont., and Worland and Torrington, Wyo

1970 – Began loading sugar beets for all customers

1983 – Added American Crystal Sugar Company as customer at Moorhead, Crookston and East Grand Forks, Minn., and Drayton, N.D.

1984 – Added Hillsboro, N.D., factory of American Crystal

2001 – Began operations for The Amalgamated Sugar Company in southern Idaho and eastern Oregon

2006 – Began operations for Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative

2010 – Began designing and manufacturing bottom discharge trailers for hauling sugar beets

2011 – Purchased first cleaner-loader for sugar beets

2013 – Purchased sugar beet harvester

2017 – Returned to Billings to transport beets for Western Sugar

2022 – Begin operations in Scottbluff and Fort Morgan for Western Sugar

For more information about Transystems and job opportunities, contact Kari Franks at (406) 727-7500.


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