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Rocky Mountain Obituaries

, 94, a farmer and rancher from the Matheson, Colo., area until 2005, passed away April 13, 2006, in Colorado Springs.

He was born on May 1, 1911, in Ramah, Colo., the second of nine children to Fabian and Anna Drotar.

Jack grew up on the Fabian Drotar homestead at Kutch, Colo., and attended Adobe Valley Public School. Growing up he loved horses, and rode on the plows while his dad cultivated the fields.

Jack’s first job at the age of 14 was shucking corn in Nebraska for $1 a day. During he early years he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps for $5 a month which he sent to his parents. During World War II, he worked in the Pueblo, Colo., steel mill and the Hanford, Wash., atomic plant to participate in the war effort. Unknown to him at the time, he machined parts for the first atomic bombs.

Jack married Marguerite (Margie) Sajbel in Calhan, Colo., on Dec. 26, 1936. To this union four children were born, Madeline, Jim, Joe and Frank.

Jack farmed and ranched near Matheson at the original Sajbel farm which was homesteaded in 1908. When he took over the farm there was no electricity or plumbing in the house which he soon installed. He was a forward thinker and kept up with technology ” his “horse” was a four-wheeler and he carried a cell phone.

The family participated in planting wheat and sorghum, running dairy cows and later beef cattle.

Jack loved working on his farm and took great pride in raising healthy cattle which were prized at the auction market. One year while operating the dairy farm he was awarded the prize for the most productive milking cow. He was also very careful to prevent erosion on his land by proper terracing and drainage control. He was proud to be a member of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization. He was a man of integrity who always kept his word to his friends, family and to those he did business with and he managed to die debt-free.

Jack is survived by his four children and their spouses: Madeline and Allan, Jim, Joe and Pam, and Frank and Kathy; two brothers, George and Duke; five grandchildren: Tina, Phil, Kelley, Sarah and Danika; a great-grandchild; three stepgrandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; Joshua, relatives and friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Margie in March 2000; his parents, Fabian and Anna Drotar; and six of his nine siblings: Mary, John, Tony, Anne, Francis and Steve.

, 94, a farmer and rancher from the Matheson, Colo., area until 2005, passed away April 13, 2006, in Colorado Springs.

He was born on May 1, 1911, in Ramah, Colo., the second of nine children to Fabian and Anna Drotar.

Jack grew up on the Fabian Drotar homestead at Kutch, Colo., and attended Adobe Valley Public School. Growing up he loved horses, and rode on the plows while his dad cultivated the fields.

Jack’s first job at the age of 14 was shucking corn in Nebraska for $1 a day. During he early years he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps for $5 a month which he sent to his parents. During World War II, he worked in the Pueblo, Colo., steel mill and the Hanford, Wash., atomic plant to participate in the war effort. Unknown to him at the time, he machined parts for the first atomic bombs.

Jack married Marguerite (Margie) Sajbel in Calhan, Colo., on Dec. 26, 1936. To this union four children were born, Madeline, Jim, Joe and Frank.

Jack farmed and ranched near Matheson at the original Sajbel farm which was homesteaded in 1908. When he took over the farm there was no electricity or plumbing in the house which he soon installed. He was a forward thinker and kept up with technology ” his “horse” was a four-wheeler and he carried a cell phone.

The family participated in planting wheat and sorghum, running dairy cows and later beef cattle.

Jack loved working on his farm and took great pride in raising healthy cattle which were prized at the auction market. One year while operating the dairy farm he was awarded the prize for the most productive milking cow. He was also very careful to prevent erosion on his land by proper terracing and drainage control. He was proud to be a member of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization. He was a man of integrity who always kept his word to his friends, family and to those he did business with and he managed to die debt-free.

Jack is survived by his four children and their spouses: Madeline and Allan, Jim, Joe and Pam, and Frank and Kathy; two brothers, George and Duke; five grandchildren: Tina, Phil, Kelley, Sarah and Danika; a great-grandchild; three stepgrandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; Joshua, relatives and friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Margie in March 2000; his parents, Fabian and Anna Drotar; and six of his nine siblings: Mary, John, Tony, Anne, Francis and Steve.

, 94, a farmer and rancher from the Matheson, Colo., area until 2005, passed away April 13, 2006, in Colorado Springs.

He was born on May 1, 1911, in Ramah, Colo., the second of nine children to Fabian and Anna Drotar.

Jack grew up on the Fabian Drotar homestead at Kutch, Colo., and attended Adobe Valley Public School. Growing up he loved horses, and rode on the plows while his dad cultivated the fields.

Jack’s first job at the age of 14 was shucking corn in Nebraska for $1 a day. During he early years he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps for $5 a month which he sent to his parents. During World War II, he worked in the Pueblo, Colo., steel mill and the Hanford, Wash., atomic plant to participate in the war effort. Unknown to him at the time, he machined parts for the first atomic bombs.

Jack married Marguerite (Margie) Sajbel in Calhan, Colo., on Dec. 26, 1936. To this union four children were born, Madeline, Jim, Joe and Frank.

Jack farmed and ranched near Matheson at the original Sajbel farm which was homesteaded in 1908. When he took over the farm there was no electricity or plumbing in the house which he soon installed. He was a forward thinker and kept up with technology ” his “horse” was a four-wheeler and he carried a cell phone.

The family participated in planting wheat and sorghum, running dairy cows and later beef cattle.

Jack loved working on his farm and took great pride in raising healthy cattle which were prized at the auction market. One year while operating the dairy farm he was awarded the prize for the most productive milking cow. He was also very careful to prevent erosion on his land by proper terracing and drainage control. He was proud to be a member of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization. He was a man of integrity who always kept his word to his friends, family and to those he did business with and he managed to die debt-free.

Jack is survived by his four children and their spouses: Madeline and Allan, Jim, Joe and Pam, and Frank and Kathy; two brothers, George and Duke; five grandchildren: Tina, Phil, Kelley, Sarah and Danika; a great-grandchild; three stepgrandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; Joshua, relatives and friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Margie in March 2000; his parents, Fabian and Anna Drotar; and six of his nine siblings: Mary, John, Tony, Anne, Francis and Steve.

, 94, a farmer and rancher from the Matheson, Colo., area until 2005, passed away April 13, 2006, in Colorado Springs.

He was born on May 1, 1911, in Ramah, Colo., the second of nine children to Fabian and Anna Drotar.

Jack grew up on the Fabian Drotar homestead at Kutch, Colo., and attended Adobe Valley Public School. Growing up he loved horses, and rode on the plows while his dad cultivated the fields.

Jack’s first job at the age of 14 was shucking corn in Nebraska for $1 a day. During he early years he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps for $5 a month which he sent to his parents. During World War II, he worked in the Pueblo, Colo., steel mill and the Hanford, Wash., atomic plant to participate in the war effort. Unknown to him at the time, he machined parts for the first atomic bombs.

Jack married Marguerite (Margie) Sajbel in Calhan, Colo., on Dec. 26, 1936. To this union four children were born, Madeline, Jim, Joe and Frank.

Jack farmed and ranched near Matheson at the original Sajbel farm which was homesteaded in 1908. When he took over the farm there was no electricity or plumbing in the house which he soon installed. He was a forward thinker and kept up with technology ” his “horse” was a four-wheeler and he carried a cell phone.

The family participated in planting wheat and sorghum, running dairy cows and later beef cattle.

Jack loved working on his farm and took great pride in raising healthy cattle which were prized at the auction market. One year while operating the dairy farm he was awarded the prize for the most productive milking cow. He was also very careful to prevent erosion on his land by proper terracing and drainage control. He was proud to be a member of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization. He was a man of integrity who always kept his word to his friends, family and to those he did business with and he managed to die debt-free.

Jack is survived by his four children and their spouses: Madeline and Allan, Jim, Joe and Pam, and Frank and Kathy; two brothers, George and Duke; five grandchildren: Tina, Phil, Kelley, Sarah and Danika; a great-grandchild; three stepgrandchildren; seven stepgreat-grandchildren; Joshua, relatives and friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Margie in March 2000; his parents, Fabian and Anna Drotar; and six of his nine siblings: Mary, John, Tony, Anne, Francis and Steve.


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